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Full text of "Oakwood Bulletin"

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OAKWOOD COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 1975-1976 



m YEAR HUNl 



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IMPORTANT 

COMMUNICATION INFORMATION 

Direct Correspondence to the Following OfRces: 

General College Administration The President 

Academic Policies . Dean of Academic Affairs 

Application for Admission The Dean of Admissions 

Part-Time Employment ... The Director of Student Finance 

Married Students' Housing The Business Manager 

Payment of Bills, Student Accounts The Director of 

Student Finance 

Student Transcripts, Credits, Grades The Registrar 

Dormitory Housing The Dormitory Deans 

Alumni Association Alumni President 



Mail Address: 



Oakwood College 
Huntsville, Alabama 35806 



TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

Oakwood College Telephone (205) 837-1630 

Carter Hall (Upperclass Women) (205) 837-1630. Ext. 302 

Cunningham Hall (Freshmen Men) (205) 837-1630. Ext. 283 

Edwards Hall (Upperclass Men) ... (205) 837-1630. Ext. 236 

Peterson Hall (Freshmen Women) (205) 837-1630. Ext. 264 

NOTE: After 5 PM and before 8 AM and on Saturdays, Sundays, and 
holidays call as follows: 

Carter Hall (205) 837-2259 

Cunningham Hall (205) 837-2351 

Edwards Hall (205) 837-2250 

Peterson Hall (205) 837-2481 



Cover Photo by Raymond Simons 



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OAKWOOD COLLEGE BULLETIN 



A Record of the Academic Year 1974-1975 
Announcements for the Year 1975-1976 



J 

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OAKWOOD COLLEGE 
Huntsville, Alabama 

Prinfed in U.S.A. 



1975 



JULY 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 I I 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 

OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 I I 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

i 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 I I 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 II 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 

DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 I I 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



1976 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

APRIL 

5 M T W T F S 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
II 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 

JULY 

5 M T W T F S 

I 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

II 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 3 1 

OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 

I 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 I I 12 13 14 15 16- 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 I I 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 

MAY 

S M T W T F S 

I 

2 3 'i^ 5 6 7 8 

9 10 I I 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 

AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 I I 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 3! 

NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 I I 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

I 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 1112 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 

JUNE 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 I I 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 

SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 II 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 2^ 
26 27 28 29 30 

DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 I I 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Academic Calendar 5 

Board of Trustees 6 

Executive G)minittee 6 

Administration 7, 8 

Administrative Council 8 

Division Chairmen and Department Heads 9 

Faculty of the College 10 

Administrative Committees 18 

Committees of the Faculty 18 

Superintendents of Services 19 

Welcome to Oakwood 20 

Campus of Oakwood College 29 

General Information 30 

Accreditation 30 

Objectives 30 

Location 31 

Veteran and Foreign Student Training 32 

Buildings and Grounds 32 

College Publications 33 

Sixmmer School 34 

The Eva B. Dykes Library 34 

Oakwood Academy 34 

Alumni Association „ 34 

Student Life 34 

Guidance and Counseling Service 37 

Governing Standards 37 

Student Citizenship 38 

Residence Halls 39 

Apartments 39 

Admissions Standards 40 

Admission of Veterans - 44 

Admission of International Students 45 

Academic Policies 46 

Standards for Graduation 58 

Curriculiun Requirements 62 

Bachelor of General Studies Degree 63 

Suggested Program of Studies 63 

Pre-Professional Curricula 65 

Cooperative Programs ..„ „ 69 

3 



Departments of Instruction 72 

Art 72 

Behavioral Sciences 73 

Biology 78 

Business Administration 81 

Business Education and Secretarial Science ^ 84 

Chemistry 89 

Education „... 91 

Vocational Education 97 

English and Literature - 97 

Communications 100 

Health and Physical Education 101 

History and Political Science 103 

Home Economics 107 

Interdisciplinary Studies Ill 

Mathematics and Physics 112 

Modern Languages 115 

Music 116 

Nursing 122 

Religion and Theology 125 

Financial Information 131 

Charges Per Quarter „ 131 

Housing 133 

Incidental Fees 135 

Refunds 136 

Tithe 136 

Property Insurance 136 

Student Financial Aid 137 

Scholarships and Loan Funds 137-140 

Degrees Conferred, 1974 141 

Geographical Distribution 145 

Index 147-149 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 





1975-1976 




AUTUMN QUARTER — 1975 


Aug. 27-30 


Faculty Colloquium 


Sept. 2-5 


Freshman Orientation and Testing 


Sept. 7-9 


Registration 


Sept. 10 


Classes Begin 


Septus- 


Last Day to Register or Add a Comse 


Oct. 18 


Graduate Record Examination 


Oct. 19 


English Proficiency Examination 


Oct. 22 


Last Day to Drop a Course Without Penalty 


Oct. 24 


Departmental Examinations for Credit 


Nov. 10-21 


Pre-registration for Winter Quarter 


Nov. 17-21 


Pre-examination Week 


Nov. 23-26 . J 
Nov. 26 r^'^ ^CiJff^ 


Final Examinations 


"W End of Quarter 


r^co^ 


WINTER QUARTER — 1976 


Jan. 4, 5 


Registration 


Jan. 6 


Classes Begin 


Jan. 10 


Graduate Record Examination 


Jan. 15 


Martin Luther King's Birthday 


Jan. 16 


Last Day to Register or Add a Course 


Jan. 25 


English Proficiency Examination 


Feb. 17 


Last Day to Drop a Course Without Penalty 


Feb. 20 


Departmental Examinations for Credit 


Feb. 23 - Mar. 5 


Pre-registration for Spring Quarter 


Feb. 22 


Senior Presentation 


Feb. 28 


Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Test Only) 


Mar. 1-5 


Pre-examination Week 


Mar. 7-10 


Final Examinations 


Mar. 10 


End of Quarter 




SPRING QUARTER — 1976 


Mar. 151 16 


Registration 


Mar. 17 


Classes Begin 


Mar. 26 


Last Day to Register or Add a Course 


Apr. 18 


English Proficiency Examination 


Apr. 24 


Graduate Record Examination 


Apr. 28 


Last Day to Drop a Course Without Penalty 


Apr. 30 


Departmental Examinations for Credit 


May 10-21 


Pre-registration for the Summer Session 


May 10-21 


Re-application for the Fall Quarter (Without Fee) 


May 17-21 


Pre-examination Week 


May 23-26 


Final Examinations 


May 30 


Commencement 




SUMMER SESSION — 1976 


June 7 


Registration 


June 8 


Classes Begin 


June 11 


Last Day to Register or Add a Course 


June 12 


Graduate Record Examination 


June 25 


Last Day to Drop a Course Without Penalty 


July 4, 5 


Independence Holiday 


July 14-16 


Final Examinations 


July 16 


End of Session 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

W. R. Beach, Chairman Washington, D. C. 

W. S. Banfield, Vice Chairman Decatur, Georgia 

C. B. Rock, Secretary Huntsville, Alabama 

G. N. Banks Glendale, California 

V. W. Becker Decatur, Georgia 

C. E. Bradford Washington, D. C. 

E. U. Carter Oberlin, Ohio 

E. E. Cleveland Washington, D. C 

H. L. Cleveland Columbus, Ohio 

W. J. Cleveland Dallas, Texas 

J. L. Dittberner South Lancaster, Massachusetts 

C. E. Dudley Nashville, Tennessee 

G. R. Earle New York, New York 

K. H. Emmerson Washington, D. C. 

J. R. Ford San Diego, California 

W. W. Fordham Washington, D. C. 

C. D. Henri Washington, D. C. 

M. E. Kemmerer Washington, D. C. 

F. Knittel Collegedale, Tennessee 

E. J. Lowe Detroit, Michigan 

S. D. Meyers Kansas City, Missouri 

G. J. Millet Washington, D. C. 

L. Palmer Pine Forge, Pennsylvania 

R. H. Pierson Washington, D. C. 

L. Quigley Washington, D. C. 

A. S. Rashford New York, New York 

V. L. Roberts Richardson, Texas 

H. H. Schmidt Decatur, Georgia 

J. R. Wagner Chicago, Illinois 

J. W. Warren Willingboro, New Jersey 

F. W. Wernick Berrien Springs, Michigan 

J. H. Whitehead Decatur, Georgia 

N. C. Wilson - Washington, D. C. 

J. P. Winston Nashville, Tennessee 

R. L. Woodfork Atlanta, Georgia 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

W. R. Beach, Chairman; W. S. Banfield, Vice Chairman; C. B. 
Rock, Secretary; V. W. Becker, C. E. Dudley, W. W. Fordham, 
M. E. Kemimerer, G. J. Millet, J. H. Whitehead, R. L. Woodfork. 



ADMINISTRATION 

OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 

Calvin B. Rock, B.A., M.A., LL.D President 

Emerson A. Cooper, B.A., M.S., Ph.D Dean of Academic Affairs 

Claude Thomas, B.S., M.A Dean of Student Affairs 

Adell Warren, B.S Business Manager 

Harold L. Lee, B.A., M.A Director of Development 

ASSOCIATES AND ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Mervyn A. Warren, B.A., B.D., M.A., D.Min., Ph.D Assistant 

to the President 

Roy E. Malcolm, B.Th., M.A., Ph.D Dean of Admissions 

Director of Summer School 

Lillian Green, B.S Registrar 

R. Timothy McDonald, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Title III Coordinator 

Paul S. Brantley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Director of 

Institutional Research 

Lawrence C. Jacobs, Jr., B.A., M.B.A Associate Director of 

Institutional Research (BHE & CORT) 
William R. Wright, B.A., M.A. Principal of Demonstration School 
Alice B. Brantley, B.S., M.A Assistant Principal of 

Demonstration School 

Roger D. Mikesell, B.S Director of Computer Center 

Richard S. Norman, B.A., M.B.A Comptroller 

Leroy Hampton, B.S Director of Student Finance 

Jonathan E. Roache, B.A., M.A. Assistant Director of Development 

(Alumni Affairs and Recruiting) 

K. Eugene Forde, B.A., M.A Assistant Director of Development 

(Publications) 

Jannith L. Lewis, B.A., M.A. in L.S Librarian 

Violin Plummer, B.A., M.A., M.L.S Associate Librarian 

John O. U. Odiase, B.A., M.A., M.S.L Assistant Librarian 

Mabel R. Norman, B.S., M.S. in L.M Media Specialist 

Clara P. Rock, B.A Archivist 

David L. Taylor, B.A., M.A Acting College Chaplain 

Harry D. Dobbins, Jr Director of Physical Plant 

Clarence E. Ates, B.S., M.S Director of Guidance Services 

Zeola B. Allston, B.A Director of Student Activities 

Ruth N. Stafford, R.N., B.S., M.A Director of Health Service 

7 



Ruth Warren, R.N., B.G.S Associate Director of Health Service 

** College Physician 

Robert Hines, B.S., R.D Director of Food Service 

Joseph Dailey, Jr Assistant Director of Food Service 

Winton J. Forde, B.S Dean of Men 

Dorothy Holloway Dean of Women 

Kermit L, Carter, B.A Director of Cunningham Hall 

Rita R. Jones Director of Peterson Hall 

** Associate Director, Edwards Hall 

Lovey Verdun, B.S Associate Director, Carter Hall 

Leonard Tucker, B.A Associate Director, Cunningham Hall 

Ruth L. Dupre, C.S.W Associate Director, Peterson Hall 



** To be supplied. 

ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

C. Rock, Chairman; J. Roache, Secretary; Z. Allston, C. Ates, D. 
Blake, D. Brooks, K. Carter, E. Cooper, R. Dupre, W. Forde, E. 
Gooding, L. Green, L. Hampton, D. Holloway, R. Jones, H. Lee, 
J. Lewis, R. Malcolm, N. Marshall, T. McDonald, L. Mulraine, 
R. Norman, L. Quirante, E. Roache, E. Rogers, D. Smith, D. Taylor, 
C. Thomas, L. Tucker, USM Sponsor, G. Valentine, L. Verdun, 
A. Warren, M. Warren, W. Wright. 



DIVISION CHAIRMEN AND 
DEPARTMENT HEADS 

APPLIED SCIENCES AND EDUCATION 
Lu L. Quirante, Ed.D. 

Department of Business Administration 

fLawrence C. Jacobs, Jr., M.B.A. 

Department of Business Education and Secretarial Science 

Rosa T. Banks, Ed.D. 

Department of Education Lu L. Quirante, Ed.D. 

Inner College Beverly McDonald, M.Ed. 

BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 
fEarl M. Gooding, Ph.D. 

Department of Behavioral Sciences .. t Raymond A. Winbush, M.A. 

Department of History and Political Science 

Clarence J. Barnes, Ed.S. 

HUMANITIES 
Lloyd E. Mulraine, M.A. 

Department of English Lloj^d E. Mulraine, M.A. 

Department of Music Inez L. Booth, M.A. 

NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 
Donald F. Blake, Ph.D. 

Department of Biology fDonald F. Blake, Ph.D. 

Department of Chemistry David Richardson, Ph.D. 

Department of Home Economics Ruth Faye Davis, M.A. 

Department of Mathematics and Physics John A. Blake, Ed.S. 

Department of Nursing Edna P. Roache, M.Exl. 

RELIGION AND THEOLOGY 
Mervyn A. Warren, Ph.D. 

t Acting Department Head 

9 



PROFESSORS EMERITI 

Carl D. Anderson, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of History 

B.Th., Pacific Union College, 1934; B.A., Pacific Union Col- 
lege, 1936; M.A., Andrews University, 1957; Ph.D., American 
University, 1960. (1968-1975) 

John J. Beale, M.A Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1949; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist 
Theological Seminary, 1952. (1949-1975) 

Robert Buyck, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of French 

Baccalaureat es Lettres-philosophie, University of Nancy, 
France, 1951; Licence es Lettres, University of Toulouse, 
1962; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1971. (1969-1975) 

Eva B. Dykes, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Howard University, 1914; B.S., Radcliffe College, 1917; 
M.A., Radchffe College, 1918; Ph.D., Radcliffe College, 1921. 
(1944-1968, 1970-1973) 

M. Irene Wakeham, Ph.D Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Andrews University, 1934; M.A., University of Southern 
California, 1939; Ph.D., Stanford University, 1965. (1971- 
1975) 



FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE 

Donald F. Blake, Ph.D Professor of Biology 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; M.Sc, Michigan State Univer- 
sity, 1959; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, 1965; Post Doc- 
toral Studies, Ohio State University, 1967-1968. On staff 1969- 
1970 and since 1974. 

Emerson A. Cooper, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1949; M.S. in Chemistry, Polytechnic 
Institute of Brooklyn, 1954; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 
1959. On staff since 1948. 

Earl M. Gooding, Ph.D Professor of Behavioral Sciences 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1957; M.A., Clark University, 
1958; Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1961; B.Litt., Oxford 
University, 1968. On staff since 1963. 

R. Timothy McDonald, Ed.D Professor of Education 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1963; M.S., Atlanta University, 1968; 
Ed.D., University of Miami, 1972. On staff 1966-1968 and 
since 1971. 

10 



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William A. Osborne, Ph.D Adjunct Professor of 

Business Administration 
Fellow, Institute of Bookkeepers, London, 1944; Fellow, Asso- 
ciation of International Accountants, London, 1945; B.S., Fisk 
University, 1951; M.A., Fisk University, 1953; Ph.D., Clark 
University, 1956. On staff 1956-1965 and since 1969. 

Lu L. QuiRANTE, Ed.D Professor of Education 

B.S.Ed., Philippine Union College, 1936; M.A., Far Eastern 
University, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1953. On 
staff since 1966. 

Clarence T. Richards, M.A., B.D Professor of Religion 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1940; M.A., Seventh-day 
Adventist Theological Seminary, 1952; B.D., Andrews Uni- 
versity, 1962. On staff since 1947. 

David Richardson, Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1965; M.S., Purdue University, 1967; 
Ph.D., Utah State University, 1972. On staff since 1967. 

Ernest E. Rogers, Ph.D Professor of Biblical Languages 

B.A., Union College, 1943; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist The- 
ological Seminary, 1952; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 
1967. On staff since 1945. 

Mervyn a. Warren, D.Min., Ph.D Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1957; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist 
Theological Seminary, 1959; B.D., Andrews University, 1961; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1966; D.Min., Vanderbilt 
Divinity School, 1975. On staff since 1961. 



Harold L. Anthony, M.A Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1956; M.A., Columbia University, 
1961; Doctoral Candidate, Columbia University. On staff since 
1965. 

Rosa Taylor Banks, Ed.D Associate Professor of 

Secretarial Science 
B.S., Oakwood College, 1967; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, 
1970; Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1974. On staff since 
1967. 

Inez L. Booth, M.A Associate Professor of Piano and Organ 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1937; M.A., Colimibia University. 
1954. On staff since 1939. 

11 



Frances L. Davis, Ed.S Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Savannah State College, 1951; M.Ed., Florida A & M 
University, 1962; Ed.S., University of Florida, 1974. On staff 
since 1973. 

J. Leroy Fish, Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Walla Walla College, 1965; M.A., Walla Walla College, 
1967; Ph.D., Washington State University, 1972. On staff since 
1972. 

David Grandison, Ph.D Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1967; M.A., Andrews University, 
1969; Ph.D., Wayne State University, 1974. On staff since 
1969. 

Rosa L. Hadley, Ed.D. .. Associate Professor of Education and Music 
B.S., Fort Valley State, 1951; M.A., Columbia University, 
1959; Ed.D., Wayne State University, 1972. On staff since 1973. 

Murray J. Harvey, Ed.S Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1936; M.Litt., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1955; Ed.S., Ball State University, 1969. On staff since 
1947. 

Jannith L. Lewis, M.A. in L.S Associate Professor (Library) 

B.S., University of Kansas, 1953; M.A. in L.S., Indiana Uni- 
versity, 1955. On staff since 1953. 

Roy E. Malcolm, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Behavioral Sciences 
B.Th., Canadian Union College, 1962; M.A., Andrews Uni- 
versity, 1963; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1974. On staff 
since 1968. 

NoRwiDA A. Marshall, Ed.D Associate Professor of Education 

B.Sc, Tuskegee Institute, 1958; M.Ed., University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1965; Ed.D., Highlands University, 1974. On staff 
since 1967. 

Delmer G. Ross, Ph.D. Associate Professor of History and Spanish 
B.A., Pacific Union College, 1965; M.A., University of Cali- 
fornia (Santa Barbara), 1967; Ph.D., University of California 
(Santa Barbara), 1970. On staff since 1970. 

RoTHACKER C. Smith, Jr., Ed.S Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1948; M.S., Michigan 
State University, 1953; M.A., Fisk University, 1967; Ed.S., 
George Peabody College, 1969. On staff 1948-1955 and since 
1962. 

12 



Florence M. Winslow, M.A Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1934; M.A., Atlanta University, 1941. 
On staff since 1954. 



Nigel Barham, M.A., B.D Assistant Professor of History 

B.D., London University (England), 1964; Diploma in Edu- 
cation, Birmingham University (England), 1965; M.A. An- 
drews University, 1968; Doctoral Candidate, University of 
Michigan. On staff since 1968. 

Clarence J. Barnes, Ed.S Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1957; M.A., Howard University, 
1960; Ed.S., Eastern Michigan University, 1968; Doctoral 
Candidate, Wayne State University. On staff since 1975. 

Alma M. Blackmon, M.A Artist in Residence 

B.S., Miner Teachers College, 1942; M.A., D. C. Teachers 
College, 1961; private study under Paul Hume (Catholic Uni- 
versity) and Frederick Wilkerson, Thomas Kerr, and Cecil 
Cohen (Howard University). On staff since 1973. 

John A. Blake, Ed.S Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Howard University, 1963; M.S., Howard University, 
1964; Ed.S., George Peabody College, 1974. On staff since 1964. 

Frances H. Bliss, M.S Assistant Professor of 

Education and Reading 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1948; M.S., A and T State University, 
1974. On staff since 1974. 

Paul S. Brantley, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1966; M.A., Andrews Univer- 
sity, 1972; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1975. On staff since 
1974. 

Oliver J. Davis, M.A Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; B.A., Pacific Union College, 
1957; M.A., Atlanta University, 1970. On staff since 1964. 

Ruth Faye Davis, M.A Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1954; M.A., Michigan 
State University, 1959. On staff since 1964. 

* Kathleen H. Dobbins, M.S. .. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1965; M.S., Purdue University, 1967. 
On staff since 1967. 

*0n leave for Doctorate Study. 

13 



* James E. Dykes, B.A Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1946; Master's Candidate, Fisk Uni- 
versity. On staff since 1971. 

Esther L. Gill, M.Ed. .. Assistant Professor of Business Education 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; M.Ed., Temple University, 
1962. On staff since 1962. 

Lawrence C. Jacobs, Jr., M.B.A Assistant Professor of 

Business Administration 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1958; M.B.A., Atlanta University, 
1969. On staff since 1971. 

LuciLE Lacy, M.M.Ed Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1968; M.M.Ed., George Peabody Col- 
lege, 1970. On staff since 1971. 

LuETiLLA Montgomery, B.S Assistant Professor of 

Physical Education 
B.S., Hampton Institute, 1954. On staff since 1973. 

Lloyd E. Mulraine, M.A Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Andrews University, 1966; M.A., Andrews University, 
1967. On staff since 1967. 

Juliaette W. Phillips, M.S.W Assistant Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 
B.S., Alabama State College, 1952; M.S.W., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1971. On staff since 1974. 

Violin G. Plummer, M.A., M.L.S. Assistant Professor (Library) 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1949; M.A., Texas Southern Univer- 
sity, 1951; M.L.S., University of Oklahoma, 1970. On staff 
since 1951. 

Sandra F. Price, M.S./Bus. Ed Assistant Professor of 

Secretarial Science 
B.S., Athens College, 1969; M.S./Bus. Ed., Alabama A&M 
University, 1973. On staff since 1967. 

Edna P. Roache, M.Ed Assistant Professor of Nursing 

R.N., Harlem Hospital, 1944; B.S.N., Loyola University, 1959; 
M.Ed., Chicago Teachers College, 1965; M.Ed., Columbia Uni- 
versity Teachers College, 1972. On staff since 1972. 

James A. Roddy, M.Ed. .. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
B.A., University of Southern Mississippi, 1965; M.Ed., Univer- 
sity of Southern Mississippi, 1970. On staff since 1965. 

*0n leave for Doctorate Study. 

14 



Ruth N. Stafford, M.A. Assistant Professor of Health Education 
R.N., Hinsdale Sanitarium, 1931; B.S., Pacific Union College, 
1938; M.A., Fisk University, 1941. On staff 1934-1936 and 
since 1951. 

David L. Taylor, M.A Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1957; B.A., Pepperdine University, 
1959; M.A., Andrews University, 1961. On staff since 1973. 

Raymond A. Winbush, M.A Assistant Professor of 

Behavioral Sciences 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1970; M.A., University of Chicago, 
1973; Doctoral Candidate, University of Chicago. On staff since 
1973. 

Keith A. Wood, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Behavioral Sciences 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1971; M.A., University of Florida, 
1973; Ph.D., University of Florida, 1975. On staff since 1976. 



Danny E. Blanchard, M.A Instructor in Behavioral Sciences 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1971; M.A., Loma Linda University, 
1973. On staff since 1974. 

Lenore S. Brantley, M.A Instructor in English 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1968; M.A., Andrews Univer- 
sity, 1972. On staff since 1974. 

Xavier Butler, M.A Instructor in Religion 

B.A., Union College, 1945; M.A., Northeastern Illinois Uni- 
versity, 1972. On staff since 1972. 

Debra K. Clark, M.S.L.M Instructor in English 

B.A., Andrews University, 1973; M.S.L.M., Alabama A. & M. 
University, 1974. On staff since 1974. 

Caryll Dormer, B.S Instructor in Nursing 

A.S., New York City College, 1969; B.S., Hunter College, 1973. 
On staff since 1973. 

Katharine M. Gibb, B.S Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Boston College School of Nursing, 1969. On staff since 
1974. 

Lela M. Gooding, M.A Instructor in English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1967; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 
1970. On staff since 1972. 

15 



Flora C. Johnson, B.S Instructor in Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1967. On staff since 1974. 

P. JuDSON Kelly, M.T. (ASCP) Instructor in Chemistry 

B.L.A., Spicer College, 1964; B.A., Oakwood College, 1969; 
M.T. (ASCP), Providence Hospital School of Medical Tech- 
nology, 1970. On staff since 1972. 

John Lavender, M.A Instructor in Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1972; M.A., Andrews University, 
1974. On staff since 1975. 

Bettye L. Nichols, M.A Instructor in Mathematics 

A.A., Tyler Jr. College, 1966; B.A., Oakwood College, 1968; 
M.A., Andrews University, 1973. On staff since 1974. 

Maxine J. Taylor, B.A Instructor in Home Economics 

B.A., Andrews University, 1957. On staff since 1973. 

Stanley A. Ware, B.M Instructor in Music 

B.M., Oakwood College, 1970; Master's Candidate, George 
Peabody College. On staff since 1971. 



PART-TIME FACULTY 

Arnold A. Dean, M.A Lecturer in Music 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1961; M.A., Andrews University, 
1963. On staff since 1973. 

Richard A. Evans, Ph.D Lecturer in Chemistry 

B.S., Tougaloo College, 1959; M.A., Western Michigan Uni- 
versity, 1962; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 1971. On 
staff since 1973. 

Calvin E. Moseley, M.A Lecturer in Religion 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1929; M.A., Seventh-day 
Adventist Theological Seminary, (1944). 

Tara T. Shah, Ph.D Lecturer in Chemistry 

B.S., Fergusson College, 1962; M.S., University of Poona, 
1964; Ph.D., University of Poona, 1968. On staff since 1974. 

Eric C. Ward, B.Th Lecturer in Religion 

B.Th., Pacific Union College, 1946. On staff since 1974. 

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SUPERVISORS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

William R. Wright, B.A., M.A Principal 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1964; M.A., Azusa Pacific College, 
1973. On staff since 1973. 

Alfred Louis Hampton, B.A Instructor in Mathematics 

and Science 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1969. On staff since 1971. 

Gracie Faye Monroe, B.A. Instructor in Science and Mathematics 
B.A., Oakwood College, 1968. On staff since 1974. 

Maebelle T. Newton, B.A Instructor in English 

B.A., North Carolina Central University, 1962. On staff since 
1972. 

Joseph W. Redcross, B.S. Instructor in P.E. and Drivers' Education 
B.S., Oakwood College, 1966. On staff since 1971. 

Cleveland B. Tivy, M.A.T Instructor in Bible and History 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1950; M.A.T., Andrews University, 
1964. On staff since 1969. 

Richard E. Tottress, B.A. Instructor in Bible and History 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1943; B.A., Oakwood College, 
1969. On staff since 1963. 

Evelyn Tucker, B.S Instructor in Business Administration 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1975. On staff since 1975. 

Phyllis E. Wells, B.A Instructor in French 

B.A., Columbia Union College, 1972. On staff since 1972. 

SUPERVISORS IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Alice B. Brantley, M.A Assistant Principal 

B.S., Akron University, 1956; M.A., Andrews University, 
1967. On staff since 1972. 

Anne M. Galley, M.S Instructor in the Elementary School 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1945; M.S., Alabama A. and M. Uni- 
versity, 1970. On staff 1941-1943 and since 1963. 

Mary E. Patton, B.S Instructor in the Elementary School 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1971. On staff since 1973. 

Dorothy M. Smith, B.A Instructor in the Elementary School 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1948. On staff since 1967. 

17 



ADMINISTRATIVE COMMIHEES 

(The President is an ex officio member of all committees.) 

Health and Sanitation: Donald F. Blake, Chairman; Katharine M. 
Gibb, Flora C. Johnson, Ruth N. Stafford, Ruth Warren. 

Loans and Scholarships: Leroy Hampton, Chairman; Lillian Green, 
Roy E. Malcolm, Jonathan Roache, Adell Warren. 

Residence Deans' Council: Claude Thomas, Jr., Chairman; Kermit 
L. Carter, Ruth L. Dupre, Winton J. Forde, Dorothy Hollo- 
way, Rita R. Jones, Leonard Tucker, Lovey Verdun. 

Staff Services: Adell Warren, Chairman; W. Ralph Davis, Harry 
Dobbins, Robert Hines, Lawrence C. Jacobs, Sr., Sylvanus 
Merchant, Richard S. Norman, Sandy C. Robinson, Harry 
S winton. 



COMMIHEES OF THE FACULTY 

(The President is an ex officio member of all committees.) 

Academic Policies: E. A. Cooper, Chairman; Clarence Ates, Rosa 
T. Banks, Clarence J. Barnes, Donald F. Blake, John A. Blake, 
Inez L. Booth, Ruth F. Davis, Lillian Green, Lawrence C. 
Jacobs, Jr., Jannith L. Lewis, Roy E. Malcolm, Beverly Mc- 
Donald, Lloyd E. Mulraine, Lu L. Quirante, David Rich- 
ardson, Edna P. Roache, Mervyn A. Warren, Raymond A. 
Winbush. 

Admissions: E. A. Cooper, Chairman; Lillian Green, Leroy Hamp- 
ton, Roy E. Malcolm, Claude Thomas, Jr. 

Arts and Lectures: Lucile Lacy, Chairman; Alma Blackmon, Inez 
Booth, Frances Davis, Stanley Ware. 

College Days: Jonathan Roache, Chairman; Lenora S. Brantley, 
Roy E. Malcolm, Leutilla Montgomery, James A. Roddy. 

Counseling and Testing: Clarence Ates, Chairman; Norwida A. 
Marshall, Juliaette W. Phillips, David Taylor, Raymond A. 
Winbush. 

Honors: Oliver J. Davis, Chairman; Nigel Barham, John A. Blake, 
Lillian Green, Sandra F. Price, Lu L. Quirante. 

Library Services: L. Quirante, Chairman; Debra K. Clark, Jannith 
L. Lewis, John Odiase, Violin G. Plummer, Delmar G. Ross. 

18 



Religious Interests: Ernest E. Rogers, Chairman; Xavier Butler, 
Rosa L. Hadley, Clarence T. Richards, David Taylor, Eric 
Ward (Advisor). 

Research: John A. Blake, Chairman; Clarence J. Barnes, P. Judson 
Kelley, Lloyd E. Mulraine, William A. Osborne, David Rich- 
ardson. 



SUPERINTENDENTS OF SERVICES 

Preston Calhoun Superintendent of College Bakery 

W. Ralph Davis, B.A Bookstore Manager 

Lawrence Jacobs, Sr Superintendent of College Farm 

Sylvanus Merchant, B.A Superintendent of College Laundry 

S. C. Robinson Coordinator of Literature Industry 

Harry W. Swinton Superintendent of College Store 

Charles Turner Superintendent of College Dairy 



19 



Weteome to Oakwood 



Here is a place "where loveliness keeps house," 

.... where "true education" means more than the pursual of 
a certain course of study, 

.... where the Oakwood program of Christian education is 
focused both on Christian growth and academic excel- 
lence, 

.... where students from scores of states and foreign lands 
"enter to learn and depart to serve," and 

.... where both teacher and student find a common bond of 
unity as "companions in learning and searching for 
truth." 

Look through these pages and get a view of Oakwood College. 
Behold its emphasis on the spiritual, its viable academic pro- 
gram, its student-centered activities, its beautiful campus, its | _ 
modern physical plant, and all that go together to make Oak- 
wood a place "where loveliness keeps house." 



20 



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NATATORIUM 




W. J. BLAKE MEMORIAL CENTER 




THE EVA B. DYKES LIBRARY 



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THE J. L. MORAN HALL— Classroom Building 




THE G. E. PETERS HALL— Fine Arts Building 




THE H. E. FORD SCIENCE HALL 




THE W. H. GREEN HALL— Classroom Building 



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THE E. I. CUNNINGHAM HALL— Men's Dormitory (Freshmen) 




^ THE BESSIE CARTER HALL — ^Women's Dormitory (Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors) 




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THE F. L. PETERSON HALL— Women's Dormitory (Freshmen) 





THE O. B. EDWARDS HALL — Men's Dormitory {Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors) _^ 



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THE N. E. ASHBY AUDITORIUM 




THE COLLEGE STORE, BAKERY AND POST OFFICE COMPLEX 




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THE COLLEGE LAUNDRY 




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THE COLLEGE DAIRY 



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30 Oakwood College 

GENERAL INFORMATION, HISTORY, 
AND DEVELOPMENT 

Oakwood College is the outgrowth of the Oakwood Industrial 
School founded in 1896 by the General Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists. After a number of years of successful operation the 
name was changed to Oakwood Manual Training School. In 1917, 
two years of college work were offered, and the school was known 
as Oakwood Junior College. In the spring of 1943, another forward 
step was taken by the institution when it was advanced to the 
status of a senior college. Since that time it has been known as 
Oakwood College. In 1964 Oakwood College became a member of 
the United Negro College Fund. 

The institution is owned and operated by the General Con- 
ference of Seventh-day Adventists as a college for Christian higher 
education. 

ACCREDITATION 

Oakwood College is accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and is approved by the Seventh-day Adventist 
Board of Regents. 

OBJECTIVES 

Oakwood College builds its offerings around the philosophy 
that "true education means more than the pursual of a certain 
course of study. It means more than the preparation for the life 
that now is. It has to do with the whole being. ... It is the 
harmonious development of the physical, the mental, and the 
spiritual powers. It prepares the student for the joy of service in 
this world, and for the higher joy of wider service in the world to 
come." — Education, p. 13. 

In harmony with this philosophy of education, the administra- 
tion and faculty of Oakwood College have defined its objectives as 
follows: 

Spiritual: 

The purpose of the spiritual and religious instruction at Oak- 
wood College is to reflect fully the image of Jesus Christ through 
emphasis on the development of character and talent, the nobility 
of ambition, the keenness of perception with sound judgment; so 
that the student is prepared to render unselfish service to God and 
man. 

Intellectual: 

Consonant with the divine plan of education, the College 
purposes to develop within its students certain attitudes and abilities 
conducive to independent and creative thinking; to further acquaint 
them with the basic facts and principles of the major fields of 



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General Information 31 

knowledge, together with a more intensive concentration in one 
or more of these fields. The College seeks further to help the 
student to develop proficiency in the use of the English language; 
to encourage an unbiased attitude on controversial issues; and to 
motivate within the student a persistent and continuing intellectual 
curiosity. 



J Cultural: 

As an integral part of the total development of the student, the 

—. College endeavors to develop in its youth desirable personalities, 

I refined tastes, and correct usage of the social graces which will 

mJ prepare them for participation in social and recreational activities, 

and to understand and respect persons of varied backgrounds and 

— , experiences. 

J Personal Adjustment: 

The College seeks to help the student understand himself, to 
— ^ the end that he may make the maximum use of whatever powers 

he has, both for his own and for the social good. While the student 
must learn the siibjects that are offered in the curriculum, he must 
also find out about himself and how he may best fit into the social 
order. 

Physical: 

The physical education program of the College attempts to 
give each student an intelligent understanding of the standards 
which govern the function and care of the body. It seeks also to 
establish in the student a consistency in the observance of habits 
and practices which engender maximum physical vitality and 
health. Emphasis is placed on the proper use of leisure time, either 
through some activity worthy of physical development or in some 
gymnastic enterprise given under supervision. 

Vocational: 

Oakwood College endeavors to teach its students the dignity of 
labor, to train them in practical work which will enable them to 
cope with life situations, to impart skill and knowledge in certain 
vocations best suited to the student's interests and aptitudes, and to 
offer professional and preprofessional courses which will aid the 
students in their choice of a vocation. 

LOCATION 

Oakwood College is located five miles northwest of the heart 
of the city of Huntsville. Huntsville is a cosmopolitan city located 
in the north central portion of the state of Alabama and nestled in 
the beautiful Tennessee Valley at the foothills of the Appalachian 
Moimtains. It has a population of 1 60,000. 



32 Oakwood College 

The College property consists of 980 acres at an elevation of 
1,100 feet above sea level. The grounds of the campus are appro- 
priately landscaped and afford a delightful setting for the College. 

Huntsville is served by the Continental Trailways and connec- 
tion with other bus lines can be made in practically all nearby cities. 
Huntsville is also served by Southern, Eastern, and United Airlines. 

Upon arrival at times other than the opening dates published 
in this Bulletin, students will find taxi service available. It is 
expected that all students will make full arrangements with the 
College before their arrival. 

VETERAN AND FOREIGN STUDENT TRAINING 

The Veterans Administration has approved the College for the 
training of veterans. A Certificate of Eligibility must be submitted 
to the Registrar's Office at the time of initial registration, in order 
that the certification of the veteran's enrollment may be made to 
the Veterans Administration. 

The College has also been approved by the United States Office 
of Immigration for the training of foreign students. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

The College property consists of 980 acres, of which 500 are 
under cultivation. Forty acres comprise the main campus. 

The W. J. Blake Memorial Center^ completed in 1968, contains 
the administrative offices of the College, the Cafeteria, the Student 
Center and other amenities. 

The W. H. Green Hall, erected in 1952, houses teachers' offices 
and classrooms for the Department of Religion and the Department 
of Behavioral Sciences. 

The J. L. Moran Hall houses teachers' offices, classrooms, and 
the College Auditorium with a seating capacity of 500. The original 
structure was built in 1939; extensions were added to the east and 
west sections in 1943 and 1944, respectively. 

The H. E. Ford Science Hall, completed and dedicated in 1954, 
provides classrooms and laboratories for the Division of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics. 

The G. E. Peters Hall, constructed in 1964, houses the Music 
Department and the Home Economics Department. 

The N. E. Ashby Auditorium, constructed in 1956, houses the 
Physical Education Department and also serves as a pavilion for 
the South Central Conference camp meeting. 

The Natatorium, completed in 1974, houses a 120' x 45' Olym- 
pic swimming pool. 

The Eva B. Dykes Library, completed in 1973, is a modem 
learning resource center. Housed in its very elegant facilities are all 
of the standard library services needed to support a strong academic 



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General Information 33 

program. This building also houses the Arabella Symington Me- 
morial Laboratory for the Communication Skills. 

The E. I. Cunningham Hall, constructed in 1947, is the resi- 
dence hall for freshman college men. It contains rooms for 136 stu- 
dents. Each room is supplied with hot and cold running water. A 
parlor, worship room, utility rooms, and the dean's apartment are 
on the second floor. The art classroom is located in the east wing of 
the first floor. 

The Bessie Carter Hall, constructed in 1966, houses 275 college 
women above the freshman rank. 

The F. L. Peterson Hall, completed in 1955, is the residence 
hall for freshman college women. It contains a worship room, rec- 
reation hall, two lounges, guest rooms, the dean's apartment, an 
infirmary, and has a capacity of 1 72 persons. 

The O. B. Edwards Hall, completed in 1969, houses 240 college 
men above the freshman rank. 

The J. T. Stafford Building, completed in 1974, is a modern 
educational center consisting of classrooms, laboratories, and offices. 

The Anna Knight Elementary School, completed in 1960, is 
located west of the College campus, and serves as a laboratory 
school for the Elementary Education Department. 

The College Laundry, constructed in 1959, is provided with 
modem equipment necessary for the needs of the College. Some 
commercial work is done for Redstone Arsenal and the citizens of 
Huntsville. 

The Dairy Barn contains a modem, well-equipped milking 
parlor. 

The Teachers' Cottages afford twenty-two livable homes for 
the use of faculty members. 

The Store-Bakery-Post Office Building, constructed in 1957, 
provides community center services. 

There are 30 apartments for married students. 

Other buildings are the central heating plant and three utility 
bams. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

The College issues in the summer of each year The Oakwood 
College Bulletin. The student handbook, In the Shadow of the 
Oaks, is revised and published periodically. 

The United Student Movement sponsors two publications: the 
Acorn, annual student yearbook; and the Spreading Oak, the 
student newspaper. 

The Alumnarian is published periodically by the Oakwood 
College Alumni Association. 



34 Oakwood College 

SUMMER SCHOOL 

The College conducts a summer school for those who desire to 
attend. During the summer session the same conduct and scholastic 
standards are maintained as during the regular session. For de- 
tailed information relative to the offerings, charges, etc., write to 
the Director of Admissions. 

THE EVA B. DYKES LIBRARY 

The Eva B. Dykes Library is a vital part of the academic pro- 
gram at Oakwood College. Designed to provide space for more than 
200,000 volimies, it now contains over 70,000 volumes. New books 
are being acquired at the rate of approximately 3,000 a year. The 
library serves as a learning resources center, and a reading, study, 
and materials center to support the educational objectives of the 
institution for faculty and students. In addition to the general book 
collection, there are special collections of black studies materials, 
archival materials, multimedia materials, children's books and pa- 
perbacks. 

Also, there is a special museum-exhibit room housed in the 
building which contains display materials related to Seventh-day 
Adventist Black history, Oakwood College history, and artifacts 
donated by Mr. P. W. Ridgeway from his many travels around 
the world. 

The library hours are as follows: 

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. 

7:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. 

7:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 

OAKWOOD ACADEMY 
The Oakwood Academy, a four-year high school, is operated 
in connection with the College. Information concerning the acad- 
emy may be obtained from the Principal. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association is open to all graduates, former stu- 
dents, and those interested in the advancement of Oakwood. At 
the annual banquet, which is held during the Easter weekend, 
officers of the Association are elected. 

STUDENT LIFE 

Orientation: To help new students of the College to make ade- 
quate personal adjustment to college life, an orientation program 
has been developed. During "Freshman Week" special tests are 
administered. Campus tours, opportunities to meet the faculty mem- 
bers, student leaders, and to receive instruction regarding the ob- 
jectives of the College are arranged. 



Student Life 35 

Religious Life: At Oakwood, religion is the natural thing. The 
College Church, the Sabbath School, the Missionary Volunteer So- 
ciety, the Ministerial Seminar, the student literature evangelism 
program, the dormitory worship hours, and the many prayer bands 
afford the students excellent opportunities for the development of 
self-expression, leadership, and initiative. 

Convocations, the Lyceum Course: During the school year dis- 
tinguished guest speakers address the student body at the chapel 
hour as well as conduct Religious Emphasis weeks. The College 
Lyceum Course brings to the campus each year several outstanding 
American artists. In addition to this, many other programs of 
equal eminence are sponsored by the College. 

Social Activities: A wholesome program of social activities is 
planned by the Director of Student Activities in consultation with 
the Coordinating Council of Campus Organizations composed of 
faculty and students. Social programs are sponsored during the year 
by clubs, classes, and organizations. The students also enjoy the 
social and cultural life of the faculty members' homes. 

Extracurricular Activities Participation: In order to ensure 
satisfactory scholarship, the extent to which students may partici- 
pate in extracurricular activities is subject to regulation. 

The recreational activities of the College are designed to serve 
the wide variety of leisure-time interests of the students. The Col- 
lege does not engage in off-campus or intercollegiate athletics. 

Intramural Sports: The College sponsors a program of intra- 
mural sports in connection VNdth the physical education activities. 

Health Service: It is the purpose of the College to encourage the 
development of the physical powers as well as the mental and 
spiritual. Every student is expected to have a physical examination 
by a competent physician and by a dentist prior to admittance to 
the College. Special forms for this examination will be mailed 
with the application blanks. The physical examination is the basis 
for a health rating. If there are conditions needing attention, the 
student is advised accordingly. 

Parents or guardians of students who are seriously ill will be 
notified immediately. 

In case of serious illness, arrangements may be made for the 
hospitalization of the student. 

Student Employment: In the operation of its plant, the College 
offers a limited amount of work to worthy students, and they are 
expected to give conscientious attention to the work assigned to 
them. The management will assign students to departments where 
work is available. Changes to other departments cannot be made 
merely upon request. When a student is assigned to a department, it 



36 Oakwood College 

is expected that he remain there for the entire school year. In some 
cases, exceptions to the foregoing are made by the management. 

Should a student find it necessary to be absent from work, he 
must immediately make arrangements with his work superinten- 
dent. In case of illness, he will also inform the health service. 

Students who must earn a large part of their college expenses 
will not be permitted to carry as much college work as those stu- 
dents who are able to devote all of their time to their studies. This 
is discussed more fully in the section dealing with student finance. 

Student Organizations: Membership in the departmental clubs 
is based on academic attainment in regular college work and is 
considered a distinct honor. The list of student organizations 
follows: 

United Student Movement: The United Student Movement of 
Oakwood College is the major student organization of the College. 
This organization seeks to promote a more perfect relationship 
among all sectors of the College community; to enhance the re- 
ligious, academic, cultural, and social programs of the College; 
and to emphatically support the aims and objectives of Oakwood 
College. 

Each matriculated, regular student of Oakwood College is a 
member of the United Student Movement. The United Student 
Movement finances its own program through the payment of 
individual membership dues. With the help and approval of 
faculty sponsors, the United Student Movement carries out such 
programs and student activities as the student body may adopt. 

Class Organizations 

Freshman Class Junior Class 

Sophomore Class Senior Class 

Residence Clubs 

Carter Hall Dormitory Club (Delta Sigma Phi) 
Cunningham Hall Dormitory Club 
Edwards Hall Dormitory Club 
Married Students' Club 
Peterson Hall Dormitory Club 

Departmental Clubs 

Behavioral Science Club (Omega Sigma Psi) 
Business and Secretarial Club (Phi Beta Lambda) 
English Club 

Home Economics Club (Omicron Nu Kappa) 
International Students Organization 
Mathematics Club (Mu Rho Omicron) 
Ministerial Seminar 



Student Life 37 

Music Club (Mu Alpha Gamma) 

Nursing Club (El Kappa Blanca) 

Oakwood Scientific Society 

Pre-law Club 

Student National Education Association 

GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICE 

During registration each student is assigned a curriculum ad- 
viser to assist in program planning. Throughout the school year 
the curriculum adviser w^ill be available for advice and guidance on 
academic questions. 

Although curriculum advisers may be consulted on questions 
and problems other than academic ones, students are invited to seek 
counsel from any member of the faculty. Personal problems will 
be given thoughtful consideration. Members of the faculty deem 
it a privilege to discuss with the student great principles, concepts, 
and ideas in an atmosphere of informality and friendliness. Stu- 
dents are urged to become personally acquainted with as many 
members of the faculty as possible. 

Students having difficulty resolving personal problems or mak- 
ing important decisions concerning educational or career plans 
should visit the Center for Student Development and Planning. 
Personnel trained in test administration and interpretation, guid- 
ance and counseling are available to give professional assistance. 
Personal information relating to specific students is held in strictest 
confidence by the Center and may not be released except at the 
request of the student (s) involved, 

GOVERNING STANDARDS 

It is the purpose of the College to develop strong men and 
women with high standards of scholarship and the self-discipline 
necessary for Christian leadership. 

The campus government and discipline, therefore, are founded 
upon the principle that character building is the highest object of 
education and that a good name, standing for integrity, honor, and 
godliness, is the objective alike of the student for himself and of the 
College for him. 

Oakwood College is a Seventh-day Adventist college established 
to provide a Christian environment in which students may prepare 
themselves for service at home and in other lands. In order to 
maintain this environment certain general rules of conduct apply. 

Student Handbook: In every community there are laws. It is 
the responsibility of every student to secure from the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs and to read the rules and regulations governing student 
life at Oakwood College, preferably before registration. Familiarity 
with and acceptance of the requirements set forth in this book will 



38 Oakwood College 

make life at Oakwood College more interesting and certainly more 
enjoyable. 

A student's standing in a Christian school is based not alone 
on his scholarship attainment but also upon his general conduct 
and his attitude toward the community in which he lives. As a 
citizen of the college community the student must realize that he 
has been admitted to a privileged group and that he has no right 
to work against that group. Any student who violates the rules of 
the College or whose conduct evidences lack of respect for the 
standards maintained by the College may be asked to withdraw. 

STUDENT CITIZENSHIP 

Each individual coming to Oakwood College for the purpose of 
entering any department of the College is subject to its supervision 
and jurisdiction from the time of arrival in Hunts ville until his 
connection is terminated by graduation or by any officially ap- 
proved withdrawal. 

The record of each student is reviewed periodically, and his 
continuation in college is based upon his attitudes and general 
conduct, as well as his scholastic attainments. 

Listed among the government policies of the College are 12 
offenses which are considered to he very serious and may be cause 
for dismissal or serious disciplinary action on the first offense. 

Since no student who makes a practice of indulging in any of 
the practices listed above would knowingly be accepted at Oakwood 
College, the first offense may result in dismissal from the school. 

A student whose progress or conduct is unsatisfactory or whose 
influence is detrimental may be asked to withdraw at any time. 

Any student dismissed from school withdraws immediately 
from the campus and may be subjected to charges of trespassing 
should he return without permission from the Administration. 

Leave of Absence: Permission for an ordinary leave of absence 
from the campus may be obtained from the appropriate Residence 
Dean. Approval must also be obtained from the work superintend- 
ent. When a leave of absence involves absence from a class, per- 
mission must be obtained from the Dean of Student Affairs. When 
the leave of absence takes a student farther than the city of Hunts- 
ville, it must be approved by the Dean of Student Affairs. Written 
permission from the parent or guardian for travelling must be on 
file for every student requesting a leave of absence. Exceptions to 
this rule is granted only to students who are both of legal age and 
self-supporting. In every case, working students must secure the 
approval of their work superintendent before presenting their re- 
quests to their respective deans. 

Attendance at Religious Services: Oakwood College is emphati- 
cally a Christian college. Attendance at chapel, Friday evening 



Student Life 39 

vespers, Sabbath School, and Sabbath morning church service is 
required. 

Use of Vehicles: Since the ownership and the use of an auto- 
mobile frequently militate against success in college, students are 
not encouraged to bring automobiles with them to the College unless 
absolutely necessary. Freshmen are not permitted to bring automo- 
biles to the College, or to the vicinity, or to operate automobiles 
owned by other individuals. 

All students, whether living in residence halls or in the com- 
munity, who own or operate any type of motor vehicle (car, motor- 
cycle, scooter, etc.) must register it with the Office of Security 
at the time of registration for the fall quarter, or within 24 hours 
of his arrival should he arrive after registration has been concluded 
or within 24 hours of its procurement within any quarter of the 
school year. Owners must have a valid operator's license and must 
show proof of liability insurance (including medical coverage) at 
the time of registration and whenever requested by traffic enforce- 
ment personnel. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

All unmarried students are required to live in one of the 
College residence halls and to board in the College Cafeteria unless 
they live with parents or with other close relatives in the City of 
Hunts ville. When campus housing is overcrowded, students age 23 
and over may apply to the Administrative Council for permission to 
live in the community. Under special circumstances, students under 
age 23 also may apply to the Administrative Council for permission 
to live off campus in an officially approved home. 

Such applications will be acted on only at the beginning of a 
quarter. Failure to secure official approval to reside in the com- 
munity or to withdraw from a college residence hall when directed 
to do so will invalidate the registration of a student. Students who 
have received approval for off campus living may be called into the 
College residence halls at any time the administration deems neces- 
sary for reasons of discipline or under-utilization of available space 
in the residence halls. 

Dormitory Supervision: Each dormitory is under the direction 
of a Residence Dean, The Residence Deans have general supervision 
of the well-being of the students under their charge. 

APARTMENTS 

The College owns thirty units of one- and two-bedroom apart- 
ments which are available for married students. These apartments 
rent for reasonable amounts. There are also approved apartments 
in the community, furnished and unfurnished, in which married 
students may live. For information write the Business Manager. 



40 Oakwood College 

ADMISSION STANDARDS 

The educational facilities of Oakwood College are available 
to young men and women of good moral character who are grad- 
uates of accredited schools and who, in the judgment of the 
Admissions Committee, are able to do college work. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

All correspondence concerning admission to Oakwood College 
should be addressed to the Director of Admissions, Oakwood Col- 
lege, Huntsville, Alabama 35806. Students who wish to enter 
Oakwood College should take the following steps: 
1. Request an application brochure from the Director of Admis- 
sions. 
\j^. Complete the application blank and return to the Director of 
Admissions with a $5 ($10 after July 1) non-refundable fee. 

3. Make sure that the following items are sent immediately to the 
Office of Admissions: 

a. Transcript of all work you have completed. 

b. Your recommendation forms. 

c. Your medical and dental forms. 

d. Your test scores (ACT or SAT) 

These documents will become the property of the College. 

4. Upon receipt of the application, transcripts of credits, recom- 
mendations, and test scores, the Director of Admissions will 
notify the applicant of the action taken. 

5. When a student who plans to live on the campus in one of the 
College residence halls receives the notification of his acceptance, 
he should at once mail the room deposit of $30 to the Director 
of Admissions. (See Housing) 

Oakwood College welcomes applications from young people 
regardless of race, religion, or national origin whose prin- 
ciples and interests are in harmony with the ideals and traditions 
of the College as expressed in its objectives and policies. To qualify, 
applicants must give evidence of Christian character, intelligence, 
health, and a desire to pursue the program outlined in this bulletin 
and the student handbook. Although religious affiliation is not 
a requirement for admission, all students are expected to live by 
the policies and standards of the College as a church-related in- 
stitution. Oakwood College reserves the right to deny admission 
to any student who in the judgment of the Committee on Admis- 
sions may not benefit from the total program of the College or 
whose presence or conduct may be detrimental to that program. 

WHEN TO APPLY OR REAPPLY 

New students are urged to submit applications not later than 
the last term of the senior year of high school. Applications sub- 



Admission Standards 41 

mitted at the beginning of the senior year will sometimes enable 
the College to suggest ways of strengthening the student's prepara- 
tion. Because of the difficulty sometimes encountered during the 
summer months in obtaining necessary transcripts, test scores, and 
recommendations, more time will be necessary for processing late 
applications. 

Students in residence may submit re-applications without 
charge until the end of the Spring quarter. Thereafter the regular 
application fee of $5 will be required until July 31, after which the 
fee becomes $10. 

What to Bring: Every student who rooms in the school home 
should bring his own bedding — four sheets, four pillowcases, a pil- 
low, two bedspreads, and blankets or comforters — also towels, dres- 
ser scarfs, cover for study table, laundry bag, pictures, and other 
furnishings he may want to make his room pleasant and homelike. 

A maximum of 1 50 watts of electric light is permitted in each 
room. No cooking or use of electric appliances of any kind is per- 
mitted in the student's room under any circumstances. 

PREPARATION FOR FRESHMAN STANDING 

An applicant for admission as a freshman must submit evi- 
dence of graduation or completion of a minimum of eighteen units 
from an approved secondary school and participation in the Ameri- 
can College Testing Program (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Board. If ACT or SAT scores 
are not available, students may be provisionally admitted without 
test scores, but will be required to take the ACT during Freshman 
Orientation. Applicants who do not meet the requirements for 
regular admission are given individual consideration and may be 
a£nitted as special students or on academic probation (See section 
on academic probation, page 52). To be considered for admission, 
the student must also have a composite average of at least "C" in 
the total secondary school courses taken in English, mathematics, 
science, social science, and foreign language. 

While the College does not recommend specific subjects for 
admission, the following minimum preparation, with quality per- 
formance in evidence is required: 

A minimum of three units of English as a preparation to 
reading, writing, and speaking the English language effec- 
tively and accurately. 

Two or more units of mathematics including algebra — algebra 
and geometry preferred. 

For those wishing to major in chemistry, mathematics, or 
physics, or take professional work in engineering, medicine and 
certain other pre-professional courses, the second unit should be 



42 Oakwood College 

geometry. Students wanting to take the above curricula are advised 
to include as much mathematics as possible in the secondary- 
program. 

Two units of science — ^laboratory experience required in at 
least one unit. 

The two units must be selected from biology, chemistry, or 
physics for those wishing to major in science, mathematics, or 
nursing, or take pre-professional work in engineering, medicine, 
dentistry or other medical arts curricula. 

Two units of social studies — should include U. S. History. 

Two units of one foreign language, and a course in typing 
are strongly recommended. 

Students admitted with fewer than two units of religion and 
two units of one foreign language will be required to complete 
additional courses in these areas beyond the general education 
requirements for the baccalaureate degrees. (An exception to the 
policy involving foreign language study may be noted in certain 
curricula leading to the Bachelor of Science degree.) 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED PLACEMENT FOR FRESHMEN 

Oakwood College will consider requests for advanced place- 
ment of freshmen from any secondary school graduate who believes 
that he qualifies for such status. Final decisions on all awards of 
credit, or advanced placement, are made by the Academic Policies 
Committee on the merits of each individual case. Petition should 
be made to the Dean of the College for recommendation to the 
committee. 

To be considered eligible for advanced placement, the student 
should have: 

1 . A grade-point average of at least 3.0 on the four-point scale 
in secondary courses other than art, music, physical educa- 
tion, driver training, and vocational courses. 

2. A satisfactory score on the Advanced Placement Examina- 
tions of the Educational Testing Service in the areas of the 
courses taken. 

3. Satisfied the Enejlish department as to his ability to write 
and speak the English language. 

Areas in which courses may be taken are American history, 
biology, chemistry, European history, French, German, Spanish, 
literature, English composition, mathematics, and physics. 

Such credit is evaluated in terms of degree requirements on 
the same basis as transfer credit. 

Students in high schools who plan to attend Oakwood College 
and who demonstrate proficiency in a field of study by having 



Admission Standards 43 

passed one or more of the Advanced Placement examinations will 
be given credit for college courses where proficiency has been 
ascertained. 

Each academic department of the College recognizes the place- 
ment value of these examinations and has designated the specific 
courses which may be credited to the student's record, wnen a 
student presents evidence of having passed the examination. 
ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students wdshing to transfer to Oakwood College from another 
college or university must follow the same application procedure 
as other students. The college from which the student is trans- 
ferring should forward to the Registrar an official transcript and a 
statement of honorable dismissal. Transfer credits may be applied 
toward the requirements for a degree when the student wdll have 
satisfactorily completed a minimum of twelve quarter hours in 
residence. A maximum of ninety-six quarter hours may be ac- 
cepted from a junior college. A student transferring from another 
college will be given credit only for work completed with grades of 
"C" or above. Background deficiencies revealed by transcripts and 
entrance examination v\dll be given individual attention. 

Transfer from Unaccredited Colleges. Such students having 
a grade-point average of at least C may be accepted on a proba- 
tionary basis, in which case their previous credit will be validated 
only after the successful completion of a quarter's work of at least 
12 hours at Oakwood College. 

Credit from unaccredited colleges, including correspondence 
schools, may be accepted on the following conditions: 

1. The credit must be C or above. 

2. Such credit will be accepted only after the successful com- 
pletion of at least a quarter in residence with a minimum 
load of 12 hours. 

3. Validating examinations may be required for such credits 
at the discretion of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature individuals who do not meet the above college ad- 
mission requirements and who do not wish to become degree 
candidates or otherwise-qualified students who may desire limited 
credit for transfer to another institution of higher learning, may 
register as special students. 

TRANSIENT ADMISSION 

A student submitting evidence that he is in good and regular 
standing in an accredited college or university may be admitted to 
Oakwood College as a transient student. Permission to enroll in 
courses on a transient basis is granted for one quarter only, and a 
student who wishes to seek re-entry in the transient classification 
must reapply. 



44 Oakwood College 

SUMMER PROGRAM FOR HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS 

Honor students who have completed the junior year of high 
school may preview college life and earn regular college credit 
during the summer session provided they meet the following 
stipulations: 

1. minimum G.P.A. of "B" 

2. written recommendation from high school principal 

3. credit for work completed will be applied to the college 
transcript after the student matriculates at Oakwood College 

4. maximum class load of 12 quarter hours. 

HEALTH RECORD 

The Physical Examination Record and the Dental Exami- 
nation Record are required of all new students prior to their 
admission to the College, These forms must be completed by a 
competent physician and a competent dentist. They are included 
in the application booklet obtainable from the Admissions Office. 

ALL NEW STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO SUBMIT 
EVIDENCE OF A RECENT PHYSICAL EXAMINATION BE- 
FORE ADMISSION. 

The College is not responsible for injuries received by students 
on or off the campus but will render prompt emergency first aid 
and treatment or assistance. 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS 

The College is approved as an institution qualified to offer 
education to veterans under the provisions of The Veterans Read- 
justment Act of 1966. 

Admission to full freshman standing is possible for those 
veterans who, failing to meet the entrance requirements in the 
regular ways, may qualify on the follovsdng points: 

1 . The candidate must have completed two years of secondary 
school work or its equivalent. 

2. The candidate must take the General Educational Develop- 
ment test, making a total score of 225, a minimum of 45 on any 
one test. 

If the candidate falls below a score of 45 in any one field, he 
must register for at least 1 unit of work on the secondary level in 
that field. These steps must be taken prior to entrance into college. 
In addition to the ACT, the candidate is given the ACE Psychologi- 
cal Examination and the Cooperative English test. If satisfactory 
scores are achieved on this battery of tests, the applicant may be 
admitted to freshman standing. 

Veterans who are eligible to obtain High School Equivalency 
certificates from a state in which they reside are urged to do so. 



: 



Academic Policies 45 

In general, a veteran should secure his Certificate for Educa- 
tion and Training from his regional office before coming to college. 
If the veteran has failed to get his certificate and cannot do so in 
time to get his authorization before the opening date of school, he 
may file his application through the College Counseling Service. 
Records of Educational Achievement while in the Armed Services 
(Form 100) should be submitted to the Records Office for evaluation. 

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Oakwood College is approved by the U.S. Office of Immigration 
for the admission of nonimmigrant students. However, no student 
should leave his country with the intention of enrolling at this 
college until a letter of acceptance and an 1/20 Form have been 
issued to him by the Office of Admissions. To obtain these docu- 
ments each international student must fulfill the following: 

1. Meet the normal college entrance requirement. 

2. Show evidence of proficiency in the English language. 

3. Submit an official document of financial support, 

4. Submit an advance deposit of 

$1,000.00 (per single student) 
$1,200.00 (per married couple) 

Please note also the following immigration regulations: 

A nonimmigrant student applying for admission to the United States for the first 
time after being issued an F-1 (student's) visa, will not be admitted unless he intends 
to attend the school specified in that visa. Therefore, if before he departs for the 
United States the student decides to attend some other school, he should communicate 
with the issuing American consular office for the purpose of having such other school 
specified in the visa. Any other nonimmigrant student will not be admitted to the 
United States unless he intends to attend the school specified in the Form 1-20 or Form 
1-94 which he presents to the immigration officer at the port of entry. 

A nonimmigrant student who does not register at the school specified in his tem- 
porary entry permit (Form 1-94), or whose school attendance is terminated, or who 
takes less than a full course of study, or who accepts unauthorized employment, 
thereby fails to maintain his status and must depart from the United States immedi- 
ately. 

WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE 

When a student decides to discontinue his course of study, he 
should complete a Change of Program voucher, which may be 
secured from the Records Office. Other regulations in this respect 
are listed under the caption '^Change of Program,'' and under the 
caption ''Refunds'' In addition, dormitory students should leave a 
Dormitory Departure card, properly completed, with the Dean of 
the home. These cards serve as a basis for issuing credit on account- 
ing records. 

Students accepted on the Work Scholarship Plan should make 
arrangements for changes in their original contract with the head 
of the Department and also with the Director of Student Finance. 



46 Oakwood College 

ACADEMIC POLICIES 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR 

The academic or college year starts in September and ends 
in August. When reference is made to courses offered in even or 
odd-numbered years, it is intended to indicate the year beginning 
in September. The academic year consists of three quarters, each 
of -which covers a period of approximately eleven weeks and a 
summer session of six weeks. 

COURSE NUMBERS AND SYMBOLS 

Courses of instruction are classified as lower division and 
upper division. Lower division courses are numbered 100 through 
299. Upper division courses are numbered 300 through 499. 
Courses numbered 1 through 99 are non-credit courses but may 
be required of certain students. 

The lower division courses are open to freshmen and sopho- 
mores and should be completed before the student progresses to 
the junior and senior years. See Admission to the Upper Division. 

Code to course symbols are: 

AR — Art MA — Mathematics 

BA — Business Admin. ML — Modem Languages 

BI — Biology MU — Music 

BL — Biblical Languages NU — Nursing 

BS — Behavioral Science PE — Physical Education 

CH — Chemistry PH — Physics 

CO — Communications PS — Political Science 

ED —Education PY —Psychology 

EN —English RE —Religion 

GE — Geography SC — Secretarial Science 

HE — Home Economics SO — Sociology 

HI — History SW — Social Work 

IN — Interdisciplinary Studies VE — Vocational Education 

COURSE SCHEDULES 

Each year the College publishes a Schedule of Classes which 
lists the courses offered, the time of meetings, the rooms, and the 
instructors. 

The College reserves the right to cancel any course offered for 
which there is not an enrollment of at least six students, and to 
limit the number of students in a class when limited enrollment 
is advantageous. 

CREDIT 

The unit of credit is the quarter hour. A quarter hour is the 
amount of credit earned for the satisfactory completion of one hour 
a week lecture or recitation or at least two hours a week laboratory 
practice throughout one quarter. 



Academic Policies 47 

Hyphenated courses (101-102) indicate that the sequence of 
courses should be taken in order. Credit toward ^aduation will 
not be allowed for hyphenated courses until the entire sequence is 
completed. 

4-4 indicates that the course carries four quarter hours of 
credit each quarter for two quarters, which, being hyphenated, 
should be taken in sequence. 

4,4 indicates that the course may be taken out of sequence. 

ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION 

A student entering his third year of college work who lacks 
any of the prescribed courses of the lower division, which are pre- 
liminary to upper division work for a degree, must first register for 
such prescribed courses of the lower division and then complete his 
program from the upper division. 

A student who has completed a two-year curriculum and later 
becomes a candidate for a degree must fulfill all the requirements 
for that degree, including entrance to upper division, requirements 
of the upper division, residence, and quality points. 

STUDY LOAD 

The normal load is 16 credits per quarter. Sophomores, jim- 
iors, and seniors may register for 18 credits if their cumulative 
grade-point average is 3.00 (B). 

Students living in college residence halls may not register for 
fewer than 9 quarter hours without permission of the Academic 
Dean. Students are not permitted to add to their load by giving 
or receiving instruction away from the College, or registering for 
correspondence work, without permission of the Academic Policies 
Committee. 

The following study loads will satisfy the authorities indicated. 

1. Immigration Authorities 12 quarter hours 

2. Selective Service 12 

3. Veterans 12 

4. H. E. W. 12 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Students are classified by the Director of Admissions and Rec- 
ords at the beginning of the school year. The student's classifica- 
tion for the year is determined by the amount of credit he has 
earned at the beginning of the college year. A student who may 
meet the hour requirement, but whose cumulative Grade Point 
Average is below 2.00 will be listed in the next lower class until 
his cumulative Grade Point Average is raised to 2.00 or better. 
Student classes are organized early in the fall quarter according 
to the following levels of academic achievement: 



48 Oakwood College 

Freshman 0-43 quarter hours 

Sophomore 44 quarter hours 

Junior 92 quarter hours 

Senior 140 quarter hours 

Postgraduate Students: Students who have completed a bacca- 
laureate degree and are registered for work which cannot apply 
toward an advanced degree. 

Special Students: Students who have not completed the en- 
trance requirements and are not eligible to enroll in a degree 
program. 

REGISTRATION 

For all students, new and returning alike, registration includes 
counseling, selection of courses, and payment of fees. Students are 
expected to register on the registration date as announced in the 
Bulletin. A registration envelope with full information on pro- 
cedures wdll be issued at the Registrar's Office to the student for- 
mally accepted. 

Students are not officially registered for a course until the 
instructor has received an approved class 'card. All students, both 
old and new, are expected to register at the beginning of each 
quarter at the time designated by the College. All students en- 
rolled in the College must pre-register for each quarter during the 
periods designated in the College Bulletin. Any student who fails 
to pre-register will be subject to a cash fine of $10.00. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

Permission to register late must be obtained from the Academic 
Dean. Students failing to register during the scheduled registration 
periods will be assessed a late registration fee of ten dollars the first 
day and two dollars for each additional day. Class periods missed 
because of late registration will be counted as absences from the 
class. Ordinarily, no student will be allowed to register after the 
designated registration days have passed. All classwork missed must 
be made up to the teacher's satisfaction. 

Permission to register late should ordinarily be obtained before 
registration day. In any case the Dean must be presented satis- 
factory evidence to indicate that it was not possible for the student 
to register on the designated date. 

CHANGE IN REGISTRATION 

After a student's registration has been completed, he may not 
add a course or drop a course or change a section without the ap- 
proval of the Adviser, the Instructor, the Registrar, and the Dean 
of Academic Affairs. This applies to all courses, including those 
taken on an audit basis. 



- 



Academic Policies 49 

A student should be very careful in his registration procedure 
to be sure that he registers for the courses that he needs and that 
he should take. A student may change the program of studies for 
which he has registered upon the approval of the Academic Ad- 
viser, the Registrar, and the Dean of Academic Affairs. A charge of 
five dollars ($5.00) will be made for each such change except when 
made necessary by cancellation of scheduled classes or an officially 
approved change of schedule time which makes it impossible for the 
student to take the course because of a conflict with another course. 

WITHDRAWALS 

Students withdrawing from college or individual courses must 
file an official drop voucher with the Records Office. Failure to do 
so will result in the recording of unsatisfactory withdrawal (WF) 
on the student's permanent record. During the first six weeks of 
any quarter the student may withdraw from a course and receive a 
W. Withdrawals after this time will result in the recording of a 
WF unless exception is granted by the Academic Dean. With- 
drawals must be approved by the Instructor, the Adviser, the Reg- 
istrar, and the Academic Dean. The deadline for class withdrawal 
for the summer session is listed in the Academic Calendar. With- 
drawals are not permitted during the last two weeks of a quarter. 
Vouchers become effective as of the date on which they are returned 
to the Registrar's Office. 

PRE-EXAMINATION WEEK 

Pre-examination Week is the week that precedes the final quar- 
ter examinations. During this week, no off-campus field trips, major 
examinations or extracurricular activities requiring student partici- 
pation may be scheduled. This week should enable students to de- 
vote full time to the completion of course projects and to prepare for 
final examinations. 

EXAMINATIONS 

AH students must take the final examination in each course at 
the time listed in the official time schedule or no credit will be 
granted for the course. Exceptions may be made only by the Aca- 
demic Dean. Should the examination schedule require a student to 
complete four examinations in one day, arrangements may be made 
with the dean to complete one of the examinations at another time. 

Examination for Waiver. Students who present satisfactory 
evidence of having a competency in an area covered by a required 
course may apply to the Academic Policies Committee. After being 
given approval by the Committee and having paid $25.00 to the Ac- 
counting Office as an examination fee (non-refundable) the student 
will be administered the examination. If he earns a satisfactory 
score on the examination, the required course may be waived and 



50 Oakwood College 

he will be allowed to substitute some other course in its place. 
Hour credit toward graduation cannot be earned by this examina- 
tion. 

Examination for Credit. If the student can present satisfactory- 
evidence of a background of formal study in any area of the cur- 
riculum, he may be permitted by the Academic Policies Committee 
to sit for a comprehensive examination covering the requirements 
for any such course and receive hour credit toward graduation. 
Upon approval of the Committee, the student will pay to the Ac- 
counting Office the tuition based on $10.00 per hour of credit offered 
by the course. This fee is not refundable. The grade earned on the 
examination will be recorded. 

Oakwood College participates in the College Level Examina- 
tion Program (CLEP) of the CEEB. Additional information can be 
obtained at the Registrar's Office. 

COURSE EXEMPTION 

A student may be granted exemption from certain required 
courses provided he fulfills one or the other of the two following 
requirements: 

1 . Presentation of credit in courses substantially equivalent in 
purpose, scope, context, and credit value to the required 
course from which exemption is requested. 

2. Successful passing of a competence examination adminis- 
tered by the department concerned. 

The granting of exemption does not involve the bestowal of 
credit, neither does it reduce the total number of hours to be 
earned for a degree. Its only effect is to increase the number of 
elective hours which the student may offer as part of his degree 
program. 

GRADES AND REPORTS 
Grade reports are issued to the student and to the parents or 
guardians at the end of each quarter provided the student's account 
is in order. 

GRADING SYSTEM 
Only quarter grades are recorded on the student's permanent 
record in the college. The following system of grading and grade 
point values is used. 

Grade Points 
Grade Per Hour 

A, A— (superior) 4 

BH-,B, B— (above average) 3 

CH-,C, C— (average) 2 

D+,D, D- (below average) 1 

F, FA (failure, failure due to absences) 

I (incomplete) 

W (withdrew) 



Academic Policies 51 

WF (withdrew failing) 

AU (audit) 

NC (noncredit) 

GRADE-POINT AVERAGE 

The grade-point average (GPA) for the quarter is computed 
by totahng the grade points earned in all courses attempted and 
dividing by the total hours attempted. Credits for which an F or 
WF are received are included in calculating the grade-point aver- 
age. The symbols WP, AU and NC are disregarded in computing 
the grade-point average. Incompletes are not included in the 
G.P.A. until after the time specified for removal. 

PASS-OR-FAIL COURSES 

Students may take up to 12 quarter hours, in addition to Choir 
and required P. E. courses, to be applied toward graduation on a 
pass-or-fail basis. This option will be applicable to all courses except 
those in the student's major, minor, cognate courses or those that 
apply toward a teaching credential. Sophomores, juniors, and sen- 
iors having a minimum grade point average of 2.50 may take ad- 
vantage of this option. Not more than one such course per quarter 
should be taken. A grade of "P" will be equivalent to a grade of "C" 
or better; and a grade of "U" will be given in place of a "D" or "F." 
These grades will have no effect on the student's G.P.A. No credit 
will be given for a course if a student receives a "U" grade in it. If 
the student receives a "P," he will receive the same amount of credit 
as if he had taken the course on a regular basis. Teachers should 
report the actual letter grade to the Registrar's Office, where it will 
be recorded on the following basis: A, B, C — Pass or "P"; D, F — 
Unsatisfactory or "U." Deadline for taking a course on this basis 
is one week after the beginning of the quarter. 

DEAN'S LIST 

Students with a minimum erade point average of 3.5, who 
carry a minimum of 15 quarter hours with no grade below a B, 
and no incompletes, are eligible for membership on the dean's list. 

HONOR ROLL 

Students who carry a minimum of 12 hours and who maintain 
a grade point average of 3.00, or above, during a given quarter with 
no grade below a "C" shall be considered HONOR STUDENTS 
for the quarter. 

HONORS CONVOCATION 

To give formal and public recognition for outstanding scho- 
lastic achievement, loyalty to College standards, and exemplary 
citizenship, the College conducts an annual Honors Convocation. 
To be eligible for participation the student must have a cumulative 
grade point average of not less than 3.25 and a minimum of 24 
hours earned at Oakwood College. 



52 Oakwood College 

GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION 

Students are graduated with honors under the following con- 
ditions: 

Honorable Mention. A student must have a grade point aver- 
age of 3.0. 

Cum Laude. A student must have a grade point average of 3.25. 

Magna Cum Laude. A student must have a grade point aver- 
age of 3.50. 

Summa Cum Laude. A student must have a grade point aver- 
age of 3.75, or above. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

I — ^indicates that a student's work is incomplete for the quarter 
because of illness or other unavoidable circumstances. An "I" will 
not be recorded for course work which is below passing, or for the 
inability of the student to submit required work as scheduled be- 
cause of negligence. "I" may be given by the instructor, subject to 
approval by the Dean of the college. Without the Dean's endorse- 
ment the grade "/" may not be accepted by the Registrar. When 
an "I" is received, it may be removed upon completion of the work 
specified by the instructor and the reporting of the final grade to 
the Registrar within the first six weeks of the next quarter. Stu- 
dents whose make-up work is of such a nature that it may require 
additional time, may, with approval of the instructor, request ad- 
vance permission from the Academic Policies Committee for an 
extension of time. The time limit is effective even though the 
student is not enrolled the following quarter. The incomplete is 
permanently changed to an "F" if not removed within the pre- 
scribed time. All incompletes should be removed before a student 
leaves campus on organizational tours (band, choir, etc.) involving 
school time. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

New students whose grade point average is less than 2.0 and 
greater than 1.5 are admitted on academic probation. Transfer 
students admitted with less than a cumulative grade point average 
of 2.0 (C) are automatically placed on academic probation. Stu- 
dents are placed on academic probation at the end of any quarter 
when their cumulative grade point average in residence falls below 
2.0 (C), and will be so notified by the Academic Dean. Academic 
probation involves a trial period which, unless otherwise stated, is 
the current academic year. However, any student on academic 
probation whose cumulative grade point average falls below i.5 
at the end of any quarter will be summarily dismissed for poor 
scholarship. A student so dropped will not be considered for re- 
admission until the beginning of the following academic year. 

All students on academic probation who have not attained the 



r 



: 



Academic Policies 53 

required minimum grade point average of 2.0 by the end of the 
third quarter may be readmitted to the College at the discretion of 
the Admissions Committee in counsel with the Academic Policies 
Committee. If readmitted, the student must attain a minimum 
grade point average of 2.0 at the end of the sixth quarter. Any 
student who has been in residence at Oakwood for six quarters 
and whose overall grade point average is below 2.0 may expect to 
be dropped. 

Students who have been dropped a second time for poor schol- 
arship may not apply for readmission within one calendar year 
from the date of their dismissal. A student whose grades are ex- 
tremely poor (1.0 or below) may be requested to withdraw from 
the College at any time regardless of the provisions stated above. 

A student on probation is denied permission to participate in 
any public event sponsored by the College; he must not represent 
the College in any official capacity or hold office in any student 
organization. 

The maximum load for a student on academic probation is 
fourteen hours. All students on academic probation will be required 
to take remedial courses in appropriate areas of study or participate 
in a program of remediation. 

REPEATED COURSES 

Occasionally students express an interest in repeating a course 
if the earned grade cannot apply toward graduation or for other 
reasons. 

A student may repeat a course in which he has a grade of 
"C" only by permission of the Academic Policies Committee. 

A student who has earned a grade of "D" in a major, minor, 
cognate, or in other required courses may, on the advice of his major 
professor, repeat the course or take another course in the same area, 
if it is recommended. In either case, the professor expresses his 
desire in writing. 

The student who repeats a course is required to register in the 
regular way, repeat all the work of the course, including laboratory 
requirements and other required activities. 

If a student repeats a course, he may receive whatever grade 
he earns, but he may not repeat the course for credit more than 
once. 

Each time a course is taken the student's record will show the 
hours for which he registered and the grade points earned. 

When a student is granted permission to repeat a course in 
which a failing grade has previously been recorded, his GPA will 
be computed on the basis of the final grade earned. However, both 
grades will appear on his transcript. 



54 Oakwood College 

AUDITING COURSES 

Students may audit courses only by permission of the Aca- 
demic Dean and the instructor concerned. 

Those who are interested in such courses should register at the 
time of the regular registration. 

No credit is given for a course audited. 

The tuition charged is one half the regular charge for credit. 

Laboratory courses may not be audited. 

A course started on the auditing basis cannot be changed to a 
credit basis after the first week of the course. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

No student shall take work by correspondence or enroll in 
another institution of higher learning while registered at Oakwood 
College without permission from the Academic Policies Committee. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION WORK 

Oakwood College recognizes and accepts credit for courses 
taken with the Home Study Institute, which is the Extension 
Division of the Associated Colleges of Seventh-day Adventists. 

A maximum of 18 quarter hours (12 semester hours) of corre- 
spondence work or extension work credit may apply toward a 
baccalaureate degree program and twelve hours toward a two-year 
terminal program. 

Ordinarily a student will be permitted to carry correspondence 
or extension work while in residence only if the required course is 
not obtainable at the college. 

It is not recommended that seniors do any correspondence or 
transient work. In cases where this is an absolute necessity, the of- 
ficial transcript for the work completed must be in the Registrar's 
Office before April 15. 

All correspondence or transient work, whether taken while in 
residence or during the summer, must be approved in advance by 
the Academic Policies Committee and Registrar respectively. Ap- 
propriate forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

Correspondence and transient credit with a "D" grade is un- 
acceptable. A course taken in residence in which the student 
earned a "D" or an "F" may not be repeated by correspondence. 
No correspondence credit will be entered upon the student's record 
until he has earned a minimum of 16 hours in residence with an 
average of at least "C." 

In no case may more than 17 hours of combined residence, 
correspondence and/or transient work be carried in a quarter with- 
out the approval of the Academic Policies Committee. 



Academic Policies 55 

VISITING STUDENT PROGRAM 

A cooperative arrangement exists with Alabama A & M Uni- 
versity, Athens College, John C. Calhoun State Community College, 
The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Oakwood College. 
Under this arrangement, a student at any of the participating insti- 
tutions may request permission to attend a class at one of the other 
schools. Conditions governing the granting of permission include 
the following: 

1. The student must be a full-time student. 

2. The student must have an overall C average. 

3. The course desired must be unavailable at the student's 
home institution. 

4. The student's request must be approved by his advisor and 
other appropriate personnel. 

5. Permission of the institution teaching the course is depend- 
ent upon availability of space for the visitor after its own 
students are accommodated. 

Any student interested in participating in the Visiting Student 
Program should contact the Dean of Academic Affairs for informa- 
tion and procedures to be followed. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

Each student whose account is paid in full is entitled to a 
transcript of credits. The first transcript will be issued without cost; 
all additional transcripts are issued upon payment of $1.00 per 
transcript. If the student is in arrears in payments of National 
Defense Loans and/or School Loans, the amount in arrears must be 
paid before a transcript will be released. 

AHENDANCE REGULATIONS 

Regular and prompt attendance at all classes, chapel exercises, 
worships, and work assignments -is expected of all students. Lack 
of attendance, therefore, implies lack of co-operation with the re- 
quirements of the College. 

CLASS ABSENCES 

Oakwood College operates under the followdng principles: 

It is the responsibility of each instructor to interpret the Col- 
lege policies concerning attendance and to make his interpretations 
known to his students at the beginning of each course. Every 
instructor has the right to count class participation including at- 
tendance in calculating the term grade. It is the responsibility of 
the student to keep a record of his absences, to keep himself in- 
formed of the requirements of the instructor, to take all examina- 
tions at the time prescribed by the instructor, and to turn in all 
assignments when they are due. 



56 Oakwood College 

Other than the above, the following regulations are in effect: 

Attendance with punctuality is required at all classes and 
laboratory appointments. No class skips are allowed. If for any 
reason the total number of absences is double the number of credit 
hours of the course per quarter, credit may, at the discretion of the 
instructor, be forfeited and a grade of "FA" be recorded. Absences 
are counted from the first official day of classes. Three tardinesses 
are equivalent to one absence. A tardiness of more than ten (10) 
minutes is considered an absence. Absences immediately preceding 
or following a vacation, school picnic, or field day are counted double. 

Authorized leaves of absence from campus do not excuse the 
student from classes or relieve the student of required class work. 
The student, however, must make arrangements with the teacher 
for every anticipated school trip and other authorized leaves at 
least 48 hours before the beginning of such anticipated schedules. 
All make-up work, involving examinations and other class require- 
ments, must be made up within seven (7) days after the absence 
is incurred. 

ASSEMBLY ABSENCES 

A student is allowed two unexcused absences from Assembly 
without penalty each quarter. A $5.00 charge will be made for each 
unexcused absence in excess of two. 

Excuses for absences from Assembly must be submitted in 
writing to the Registrar's Office before the very next Assembly. 
Failure to do this will automatically result in an unexcused absence. 

Permanent excuses from Assembly may be granted in the case 
of unavoidable work responsibilities. In order to be eligible for a 
permanent excuse for a quarter, a written request, signed by the 
work supervisor, must be submitted to the Registrar's Office no later 
than two weeks after the beginning of each quarter. 

AHENDANCE AT RELIGIOUS SERVICES 

Seventh-day Adventists believe that the influence of religious 
services is an important factor in attaining Christian character. 
Therefore, attendance at worship services in the dormitories and at 
all Friday evening, Sabbath School, and church services is required 
of the students. 

ERRORS AND CORRECTIONS 

Grade reports are issued at the close of each quarter. Upon the 
receipt of a grade report, the student should carefully check it for 
correctness as to the courses recorded, credits, and grades. Any 
corrections needed must be taken care of within one week. No 
change will be made in the permanent record after two weeks from 
the issue of the grade report. 



Academic Policies 57 

PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 

During the Spring of his Junior year, but no later than the fall 
of the senior year, a student is required to take a proficiency test in 
English. This test is administered as scheduled in the catalog once 
every quarter except Summer. If a student fails to pass the test, he is 
required to enroll for EN 250, a two-hour course in English funda- 
mentals, and to pass this in order to qualify for graduation. To be 
eligible for participation in Senior Presentation, he must have passed 
the test, have taken English Fundamentals, or be currently enrolled 
in it. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION 

All graduating seniors are required to take both the aptitude 
and advanced sections of the Graduate Record Examination, except 
majors in Theology, Secretarial Science, Home Economics, Busi- 
ness Education and Business Administration, who will be expected 
to take the aptitude section. The Medical College Admissions Test, 
the Dental Aptitude Test, the Law School Admissions Test, the 
National Teachers' Examination, and the Admission Test for Grad- 
uate Study in Business are accepted as substitutes for the Graduate 
Record Examination. 



58 Oakwood College 

STANDARDS FOR GRADUATION, 
DEGREES, AND CERTIFICATES (B.A. and B.S.) 

DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS 

Oakwood College is a member of the Association of Seventh- 
day Adventist Colleges and Secondary Schools, and is authorized by 
the State of Alabama to confer appropriate literary degrees and 
honors upon its graduates. The College grants the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science and diplomas in a limited 
number of terminal courses. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred upon students who 
meet the requirements for graduation from the Liberal Arts cur- 
riculum or the curriculum in Religion. 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon students who 
meet the requirements for graduation from the following special- 
ized curricula: business administration, elementary education, 
home economics, and secretarial science. 

Students completing specific requirements for certain two 
year terminal courses are awarded diplomas as Associates in Arts or 
Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BACCALAUREATE DEGREES 

Students meeting the following conditions are eligible for 
baccalaureate degrees: 

General Requirements 

1 . A candidate for a degree must have a satisfactory academic 
record and be of good moral character. In addition, the 
candidate must possess personal attributes which indicate 
that he has potential for leadership in his community and 
will reflect credit upon Oakwood College. The College re- 
serves the sole ana final right to determine whether the 
candidate possesses such personal attributes. 

2. The responsibility for meeting requirements for graduation 
rests primarily upon the student. He should acquaint him- 
self with the requirements as outlined in the College Bulle- 
tin, and, with the aid of his advisor, he should plan his 
work so as to fulfill each one of the requirements. 

3. Candidates for degrees are expected to be fully informed 
concerning degree requirements and are responsible for 
their fulfillment. A student shall have the option of meet- 
ing degree requirements as published in the bulletin at the 
time of initial registration or any bulletin published while 
in regular attendance. Those not in regular attendance for 
two consecutive quarters must meet the requirements of 
the current Bulletin upon resuming attendance. 



Standards for Graduation 59 

Quantitative 

1. The satisfactory completion of a minimum of 192 QUAR- 
TER HOURS including 60 HOURS at the upper division 
level. 

2. The satisfactory completion of the CORE CURRICULUM 
requirements. 

3. The satisfactory completion of a MAJOR field of depart- 
mental specialization, including at least 24 hours of upper 
division courses. 

4. The satisfactory completion of a MINOR field of depart- 
mental specialization, with at least 6 hours of upper divi- 
sion courses. 

Qualitative 

1. The attainment of a CUMULATIVE GRADE POINT 
AVERAGE of 2.0. 

2. The attainment of a minimum over-all grade point average 
of 2.0 in the MAJOR and MINOR fields. No grade below 
"C" may apply towards the major and/or minor. 

Residence 

1. The satisfactory completion in residence of a minimum of 
36 quarter hours during three consecutive quarters of the 
senior year. 

2. The satisfactory completion in residence of a minimimi of 
30 quarter hours at the upper division level. 

3. The satisfactory completion in residence of one half of the 
upper division hours in the major field. 

4. The satisfactory completion in residence of 6 hours of the 
upper division hours in the minor field. 

MAJORS AND MINORS 

In addition to the Core Curriculum (General Education Re- 
quirements), a major and a minor are required for each degree. 
These majors and minors, however, may include appropriate work 
in the Core Curriculum. The following majors and minors, with 
the minimum number of quarter hours required for each, are 
available at this college: 

Major Minor 

Subject Quarter Hours Quarter Hours 

APPLIED SCIENCES AND EDUCATION 

Business Administration 48 28 

Business Education 48 — 

Elementary Education 48 — 

Health and Physical Education — 28 

Secretarial Science 48 28 

Secondary Education — 32 

BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

History 45 28 



60 



Oakwood College 



Political Science 
Psychology- 
Social Work 
Sociology 

HUMANITIES 

English 
Music 

NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Food & Nutrition 
Home Economics 
Mathematics 
Medical Technology 48 

Nursing* 50 

Physics — 

RELIGION AND THEOLOGY 

Biblical Languages — 

Religion 45 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Black Studies — 



— 


28 


45 


28 


45 


28 


45 


28 


45 


28 


86 


34 


:s 

45 


28 


45 


28 


48 





48 


28 


45 


28 



28 



28 
28 



28 



CANDIDACY FOR DEGREE 

Degrees are ordered by the Registrar's Office the day after the 
annual Senior Presentation Program (February 22, 1976) for all 
Degree Candidates. To be eligible for Degree Candidacy, the follow- 
ing items must be satisfactorily completed: 

1. Degree Candidates must be official members of the Senior Class. 

2. The Program of Studies (Check Sheets) must be submitted to 
and reviewed by the Registrar not later than six (6) weeks after 
the beginning of the Fall or first quarter of the Senior year. 
Check Sheets may be submitted during the spring or third quar- 
ter of the Junior year. Forms may be obtained in the Registrar's 
Office. 

3. The Senior Class Dues must be paid in full by January 31, 1976. 

4. Satisfactory results must be on file in the Registrar's Office for 
the English Proficiency Examination or the student must be 
enrolled in the course EN 250 English Fundamentals at the time 
of the Senior Presentation Program (winter quarter). 

Students are not considered Degree Candidates until so notified 
by the Registrar. In order to participate in the commencement exer- 

* Associate Degree Program 



Standards for Graduation 61 

cises, a student must have satisfactorily completed all requirements 
for graduation on time. Degrees will be issued to those students who 
have met all necessary requirements, including the clearance of all 
financial obligations with the College. All candidates are expected 
to participate in the commencement exercises unless granted per- 
mission to be graduated in absentia by the Academic Policies 
Committee. 

SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Two different degrees may be conferred at the same time if 
the candidate has met the requirements of both degrees, and has 
completed a total of 240 quarter hours of credit. The College does 
not grant two degrees of the same kind to any one person, such as 
two B.A.'s or two B.S.'s. Students may, however, earn a second 
degree after one degree has been conferred by completing an addi- 
tional 48 quarter credits, meeting the basic degree requirements of 
both degrees, and the requirements of a second major and a second 
minor. 



62 Oakwood College 

CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

Oakwood College offers programs of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of General 
Studies degrees. To qualify for these degrees students must fulfill 
the major and minor requirements in the areas they select, and in 
addition must meet the basic requirements listed below. 

Candidates for the B.S. degree are required to meet all basic 
requirements except foreign language. 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY LEADING TO THE 

BACHELOR OF ARTS AND 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES 

Liberal Arts Curriculum 

Basic Requirements or General Education Requirements 

Behavioral Science « 4 hours 

Required: PY 101 or SO 101 

Education ^ ^ 2 hours 

Required: ED 101 

Health - 2 hours 

Required: PE 211 

Humanities 24 hours 

Required: EN 101-102-103, EN 201, AR 201, MU 201 

Modem Language 12 hours 

(Required of all candidates for the B.A. degree. Religion ma- 
jors may substitute Biblical Languages. This requirement 
can be met by students submitting two units of a foreign lan- 
guage and passing the Foreign Language Proficiency Test.) 

Physical Education 3 hoiu*s 

Required: PE 101, 102; Elective 1 hour 

Religion — 16-22 hoiu-s 

Required: RE 111, RE 201 or 202, RE 311 or 312, RE 331 
(Bible Survey — 6 hours required of students submitting less 
than 2 imits of High School Bible.) 

Science and Mathematics _ _ _ 20 hours 

Required: BI 101, 102, MA 101, PH 101, 102 

Social Sciences 12 hours 

Required: HI 101, 102 

Electives: HI 165, GE 201, PS 211, PS 450, HI 457, PS 441 

(Students who desire upper division courses should consult 
with the Department Head.) 

Total _ — 95-101 hours 



[ 
[ 



[ 



Curriculum Requirements 63 

BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES DEGREE 

This degree program is an alternative to the B.A. and B.S. 
degree programs. It is designed to give the student who so desires 
an opportunity to choose a broad, interdiscipHnary prograin of 
studies. The B.G.S. degree program, with its smaller Core Curricu- 
lum requirements, provides varied opportunities for students to cross 
departmental lines in obtaining the kind of education that would 
best prepare them for future study of hybrid disciplines. 

The following are the requirements of the B.G.S. degree 
program: 

1. A Core Curriculum of 48 QUARTER HOURS 

Behavioral and Social Sciences 12 hours 

One course must be in History 
Humanities 12 hours 

EN 101-102-103 
Natural Sciences 12 hours 

One course must be in Mathematics 
Religion 12 hours 

RE 101-102 or RE 111 

2. Instead of a major and a minor, the student will pursue concentrations in at 
least three disciplines, with at least 16 upper division hours in each. A con- 
centration in this context is defined as a unified, departmental area of study 
consisting of a minimimi of 36 hours but without any specific course or 
cognate requirements. 

3. The satisfactory completion of at least 90 QUARTER HOURS at the junior 
and senior levels in any fields with no grade below a "C". Not more than 
30 of the 90 upper level hours or 60 of the 192 quarter hours would be 
accepted from any one department. 

4. To be admitted to the program, students must have completed the core 
curriculum and have a grade point average of at least 2.25. 

5. To remain in this program, each student is required to have his program of 
study approved by his faculty advisor and the Academic Policies Committee. 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM 


OF STUDIES FOR 






B.A. AND 


B.S. 


DEGREES 








TRACK 


1 FRESHMEN 






Core Requirements 


Fall 




Winfer 


Spring 


Credit 


Religion 


RE 101 




RE 102 


RE 111 


3, 3, 4 


Social Sciences 


HI 101 




HI 102 


PS 211 

or 
GE201 

or 
HI 165 


4, 4, 4 


Life Sciences 


BIlOl 




BI102 


Elective 


4, 4, 4 


English 


EN 101 




EN 102 


EN 103 


4, 4, 4 


Physical Education 


PElOl 




PE102 


Elective 


1, 1, 1 



Total 



16, 16, 17 



64 



Oakwood College 







TRACK if FRESHMEN 






Core Requirements 


Foil 


Winter 


Spring 


Credit 


English 




EN 101 


EN 102 


EN 103 


4, 4, 4 


Physical Sciences 


PHlOl 


PH102 


Elective 


4, 4, 4 


Behavioral Science, 


(SO 101 or PYlOl) 


Same 


Same 


4, 4, 4 


Health - Education, 










& Math Sequence 


(PE211-ED101) or 


Same 


Same 


4, 4, 4 






MA 101 








Religion 




RE 101 


RE 102 


RElll 


3, 3, 4 


Physical Educa 


tion 


PElOl 


PE102 


Elective 
Total 


1, 1, 1 




16,16,17 






TRACK i SOPHOMORES 






Core Requirements 


Fail 


Winter 


Spring 


Credit 


Religion 




RE 201 

or 
RE 202 


Elective 


Elective 


4, 4, 4 


Physical Sciences 


PHlOl 


PH102 


Elective 


4, 4, 4 


Behavioral Science, 


(SO 101 or PYlOl) 


Same 


Same 


4, 4, 4 


Health - Education, 










& Math Sequence 


(PE211-ED101) or 


Same 


Same 


4, 4, 4 






MA 101 








Humanities 




EN 201 


MU201 


AR201 
Total 


4, 4, 4 
16, 16, 16 






TRACK 11 SOPHOMORES 








Fall 


Winter 


Spring 


Credit 


Religion 




RE 201 
RE°202 


Elective 


Elective 


4, 4, 4 


Social Sciences 




HI 101 


HI 102 


PS 211 

or 
GE201 

or 
HI 165 


4, 4, 4 


Life Sciences 




BIlOl 


BI102 


Elective 


4, 4, 4 


Humanities 




EN 201 


MU201 


AR201 
Total 


4, 4, 4 




16,16,16 






JUNIOR YEAR 






Course No. 


Course Title 






Hours 


RE 331 


Gift of Prophecy 


................... 


....................... 


... 4 




(Electives to make 48 hours) 










SENIOR YEAR 






Course No. 


Coarse Title 






Houra 


RE 311 or 


Prophetic Interpretation .. 







4 


312 


(Daniel and Revelation) 










(Electives to make 48 hours) 







: 



Curriculum Requirements 65 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

AND 

TWO-YEAR COURSES 

Oakwood College offers pre-professional curricula in a number 
of fields. Students planning to enter a particular professional 
school should acquaint themselves with the specific requirements 
of that school. The following curricula will satisfy the entrance 
requirements of many professional schools. 

PRE-LAW 

Students interested in pre-law should counsel with the Pre-law 
Advisor concerning the entrance requirements of law schools. 

Since a college degree is necessary for admission to most law 
schools, it is recommended that a student elect a major field of con- 
centration not later than the beginning of the second year. Majors 
and minors in the fields of business administration, history, English, 
behavioral science and political science are generally preferred, 
although other majors may be acceptable. Electives in human 
physiology and anatomy and in mathematics are quite helpful. 

The booklet, Law Schools and Bar Admission Requirements, 
gives detailed information concerning a desirable academic back- 
ground for the study of law. Interested students who desire a copy 
of this booklet should write to the follovsdng address: 

Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar 
American Bar Association 
1155 East Sixtieth Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60600 

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL 

Students preparing for medicine should be conversant v\dth the 
requirements of the medical college to which they plan to apply. 
They should be careful to include all required courses in their 
program of study. 

Since a college degree is necessary for admission to most medi- 
cal schools, it is recommended that the student elect a major field of 
speciahzation not later than the beginning of the second year. In- 
asmuch as training in scientific thinking is an invaluable asset to 
the study of medicine, it is recommended that the student major 
either in biology or chemistry; however, the choice is left to the 
student. 

For recommendation to a medical school, a student should: 

a. Maintain a coiiunendable record of conduct and char- 
acter. 



66 



Oakwood College 



b. Attain a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in both 
science and non-science courses. 

c. Take the medical aptitude test during the 12 months 
preceding his application. 

d. Complete the basic requirements for the Baccalaureate 
degree. 

e. Include the following science and mathematics courses 
in his program of study: 

Courses Course Title Hours 

BIOLOGY 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

BI 225 Embryology .- 5 

BI 226 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 5 

BI 331 Histology 4 

BI 422-423 General Physiology 4-4 

CHEMISTRY 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 

CH 301-302-303 Organic Chemistry 12 

CH 321 Quantitative Analysis 4 

CH 322 Physical Chemistry 4 

CH 401 Biochemistry 4 

MATHEMATICS & PHYSICS 

MA 111 College Algebra 4 

MA 112 Plane Trigonometry 4 

MA 211 Survey of Calculus 4 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics „ 12 

The pre-dental student is required to take the Dental Aptitude 
Test not later than the January preceding the school year for which 
registration is anticipated. 



r 



PRE-MEDICAL RECORD ADMINISTRATION — 
TWO YEARS 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

English 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Humanities 

AR 201 Art Appreciation 4 

EN 201 World Literature 4 

MU 201 Music Appreciation - 4 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
BI 111-112 Himian Anatomy & Physiology »..- 10 

Religion 

RE 101, 102 Bible Survey _ _ 6 

RE 201, 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 8 



Curriculum Requirements Q7 

Social Sciences 

HI 211, 212 U. S. History I, H 8 

Secretarial Sciences 

SC 111-112 Elementary Typing — . 4 

SC 113 Intermediate Typing _ 2 

SC 141 Records Management _ 2 

Business Administration 

BA 101 Intro, to Business — _ 4 

BA 111, 112, 113 Data Processing 9 

Behavioral Science 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

Electives to complete a minimum of 96 hours 



PRE-OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY — TWO YEARS 

PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY — TWO YEARS 

PRE-DENTAL HYGIENE — TWO YEARS 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

English 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

Humanities 

AR 201 Art Appreciation 4 

EN 201 World Literature 4 

MU 201 Music Appreciation 4 

Social Sciences 

HI 211, 212 U. S. History I, II 8 

Behavioral Science 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

Natural Sciences 
Biology 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

Chemistry 

CH 101-102-103 Survey of Chemistry _ _.._ 9 

Mathematics 

MA 101 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 4 

Physics 

PH 101, 102 The Physical Sciences ...„ 8 

Religion 

RE 101, 102 Bible Survey 6 

RE 201, 202 Christian Fundamentals .- 8 

Electives to complete a minimiun of 96 hours 



68 



Oakwood College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (First Year) 

It is important that students who wish to receive a Bachelor of 
Science degree in Nursing become famihar with the specific en- 
trance requirements of the particular institution they wish to enter 
and choose from the electives those subjects that will fulfill the 
requirements of the school of nursing selected. 

Prerequisites: Eighteen units of work taken in high school or 
academy that include the following: 

Courses Units 

English (Excluding Business English) 3 

History (American History and Government) 1 

Mathematics (Excluding General Math and 

Business Arithmetic, Algebra required) 2 

Science (Chemistry required; Physics desirable) 2 

Electives - To complete 18 units 

Electives may be selected from Mathematics, Foreign Language, 
Literature or Science. A grade lower than a "C" in a secondary 
science course is unacceptable. 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

RE 111 or 101 Life & Teachings or Bible Survey 4 or 6 

BI 111-112 Anatomy and Physiology 10 

BI 221 Microbiology „ 5 

CH 101-102-103 Survey of Chemistry _ 9 

EN 101-102-103 English Composition _ _ 12 

PE 101, 102, Elective Physical Education 3 

Electives _ _ 5 

Electives may be selected from American Government, Psychology, Sociology, 
Foods and Nutrition and Speech. 



PRE-X-RAY — ONE YEAR 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

BI 111-112 Human Anatomy & Physiology 10 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry „ _.._ _.._ _... 12 

RE 101, 102 Bible Survey ..._ „ _ _ 6 

MA 101 Fimdamental Concepts of Mathematics 4 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 4 

PE 101, 102, Elective Physical Education — _ 3 



Curriculum Requirements 69 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS 

The Alabama Center for Higher Education is a consortium of 
eight four-year, degree-granting institutions of higher education in 
the State of Alabama. Oakwood College is a member of the Ala- 
bama Center for Higher Education. As a member of this con- 
sortium, Oakwood College participates with other member colleges 
in offering the following cooperative curricula: 

1. Three-Two Cooperative Curriculum in Architecture 

2. Three-Two Cooperative Engineering Curriculum 

3. Two-Four Cooperative Veterinary Medicine Curriculum 



THREE-TWO COOPERATIVE CURRICULUM 
IN ARCHITECTURE 

Oakwood College, as a member of the ACHE Consortium, 
makes available to its students a Three-Two Cooperative Curricu- 
lum in Architectural Science. Students enrolling in this curriculum 
should complete the first three academic years at Oakwood College 
while pursuing a strong, liberal arts program with concentrations in 
the physical sciences, art, and the social sciences. Upon successful 
completion of this three-year architectural science curriculum, the 
student should transfer to the Tuskegee Institute School of Archi- 
tecture and take courses in architecture for two years. Students 
successfully completing this five-year program will be awarded the 
Bachelor of General Studies degree from Oakwood College and the 
Bachelor of Arts degree in Architectural Science from Tuskegee 
Institute. 



THREE-TWO COOPERATIVE ENGINEERING 
CURRICULUM 

Students who enroll in this curriculum should complete the 
first three academic years at Oakwood College and pursue a strong 
liberal arts program with emphasis on physics and mathematics. 
Upon successful completion of this three-year Pre-Engineering Cur- 
riculum, the student should transfer to Tuskegee Institute and 
specialize in either Mechanical Engineering or Electrical Engineer- 
ing for two years. Students successfully completing this coopera- 
tive program of courses will receive a Bachelor of General Studies 
degree from Oakwood College and a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Engineering from Tuskegee Institute. 



70 



Oakwood College 



TWO-FOUR COOPERATIVE VETERINARY 
MEDICINE CURRICULUM 

Students who enroll in this program should complete the first 
two academic years at Oakwood College and pursue the following 
Pre- veterinary Medicine Curriculum: 

PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

English 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman English ™ 12 

Physical Science 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 

CH 301-302-303 Organic Chemistry 12 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics 12 

Biological Science 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

BI 225 Vertebrate Embryology 5 

Electives in Social Sciences and Humanities 16 

General Electives 15 

96 

Students completing this curriculum should then transfer to 
the School of Veterinary Medicine of Tuskegee Institute. Upon 
completion of the first two years of the professional curriculum in 
Veterinary Medicine, the student will receive the Bachelor of 
General Studies degree from Oakwood College. At the end of the 
four-year professional program in Veterinary Medicine, the student 
will receive the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from 
Tuskegee Institute. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Oakwood College, the School of Medical Technology of Hub- 
bard Hospital, Meharry Medical College, Kettering Memorial Hos- 
pital, and the School of Medical Technology of Florida Sanitarium 
and Hospital have established a cooperative curriculum which 
leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology 
from Oakwood College. 

Students who enroll in this curriculum should complete the 
first three academic years at Oakwood College and the fourth year 
at one of the above cooperating institutions. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the one-year internship course in Medical Tech- 
nology at one of the above named institutions, the student will 
receive the Bachelor of Science degree from Oakwood College. 



Curriculum Requirements 71 

A candidate for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major 
in Medical Technology must fulfill the following requirements: 

1 . Complete the basic requirements for the Bachelor of Science 
degree at Oakwood College. 

2. Include the following Science and Mathematics courses in 
his program of studies: 

Courses Course Titles Hours 

BI 121-122-123 General Biology 12 

BI 221 Microbiology _ 5 

BI 331 Histology .— _ _ 4 

CH 111-112-113 General Chemistry 12 

CH 301-302-303 Organic Chemistry „ 12 

CH 321 Quantitative Analysis _ 4 

CH 401 Biochemistry 4 

MA 111,112 College Algebra, Plane Trigonometry _... 8 

PH 111-112-113 General Physics _ -... _ 12 

3. Have credits approved by the Registry of Medical Tech- 
nologists of The American Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

4. Gain admission to one of the above named institutions. 

5. Successfully complete the twelve-month internship at one 
of the above named institutions. 



72 



Oakwood College 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTrON 

The course offerings of the college are organized in seventeen 
departments of instruction: 

Department of Art 

Department of Behavioral Sciences 

Department of Biology 

Department of Business Administration 

Department of Business Education and Secretarial Science 

Department of Chemistry 

Department of Education 

Department of English 

Department of Health and Physical Education 

Department of History and Political Science 

Department of Home Economics 

Department of Interdisciplinary Studies 

Department of Mathematics and Physics 

Department of Modem Languages 

Department of Music 

Department of Nursing 

Department of Religion and Theology 

Department of 

ART 

ART (AR) 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

AR 201. ART APPRECIATION 4 

The purpose of this course is to engender an appreciation for the world's 
masterpieces of art. 

AR 211. DRAWING 4 

The development of the concepts and techniques required in order to ac- 
complish competent graphic expression will be approached in the following 
media: pencil, ink, charcoal, pastels, chalk, brush and pen, conte crayon; 
and studies into the following techniques: sketching, line drawing, contour 
and cross hatch drawing, sculptural and atmospheric drawing, ink, brush 
and wash drawing. Four studio hours a week, 

AR 251.252. CERAMICS 4,4 

The uses of various clays in pottery making and sculpture will be ap- 
proached with emphasis on design and the development of skill in the 
manipulation of tools and materials. Four studio hours a week. 



Departments of Instruction 73 

Deparfment of Professor: Gooding 

»*i^^i* A I Assistant Professors: Phillips, Winbush (Head), Wood 

BEH AVI ORAL instructor: Blanchard 

SCIENCES 

PSYCHOLOGY (PY), SOCIOLOGY (SO) AND SOCIAL WORK (SW) 

The object of these programs is to acquaint the student with 
the principles, facts, approaches and methods of the disciphne; to 
provide him with an understanding of psychology and sociology as 
sciences of behavior; and to improve his insight into his own be- 
havior and that of others. The department aims to provide a good 
understanding of human adjustive behavior, of how societies, com- 
munities and groups are organized and maintained, and how the 
behavior of the individual is related to that of the group. It also 
seeks to introduce the student to the concepts and methods used in 
psychological and sociological research. 

No course may apply towards both a major and a minor. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Psychology) 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 201 (Psychology of Religion) 4 hours 

PY 301 (Social Psychology) 4 hours 

ED 311 (Human Growth and Development) 4 hours 

PY 319 (Theories of Personality) 4 hours 

PY 321 (Abnormal Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 360 (Introduction to Experimental Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 361 (Advanced Experimental Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 401 (History and Systems of Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 411 (Principles of Research) 4 hours 

Electives (Psychology, Sociology and Social Work) 5 hours 

(28 hours of upper division courses are required) 45 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28 hours 

Required COGNATES: 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) 4 hours 

MA 307 (Statistical Methods I) 4 hours 

MA 308 (Statistical Methods II) 4 hours 

MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYCHOLOGY MINOR 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 201 (Psychology of Religion) 4 hours 

PY 301 (Social Psychology) 4 hours 

PY 401 (History oJF Psychology) „ 4 hours 

16 hours 
Electives (Psychology, Sociology and Social Work) 12 hours 

(12 hours of upper division courses are required) 28 hours 



74 



Oakwood College 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PY 101. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOOY 4 

An experimentally oriented introduction to the science of psychology, in- 
cluding such concepts as emotion, motivation, adjustment, perception, learn- 
ing, intelligence, measurement, and experimental method. 

PY 111. SCHOLARSHIP SKILLS 2 

The application of psychology to the development of effective college study 
skills. Students' individual abilities are assessed so that group and individ- 
ual programs may be designed to eliminate students' specific weaknesses 
and to improve their general higher level work skills. Elective credit only. 

PY 201. PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION 4 

A study of Christian principles of Psychology based on the writings of 
Ellen G. White. Prerequisite: PY 101. 

PY 221. PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT 4 

A study and development of methods of effective adjustment to stresses re- 
sulting from social interaction, occupational choice, education and life 
goals, and marital relationships. Prerequisite: PY 101. 

PY 301. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

The study of group affiliation, group standards, social perception and other 
social factors influencing the behavior of individuals, and interacting among 
groups. Prerequisite: PY 101 and SO 101. 

PY 319. THEORIES OF PERSONALITY 4 

A study of the main theories of personality structure, with consideration of 
the essential ingredients of healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Prere- 
quisite: PY 101 and SO 101. 

PY 321. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (Psychology of Abnormal Behavior) 4 

A study of the types, natures and causes of abnormal behavior; the effects 
of maladaptive behavior on individuals, families and communities, and 
methods of treatment. Prerequisite: PY 101 and PY 319. 

PY 331. GROUP DYNAMICS 4 

A study of the dynamics of groups with special emphasis being placed on 
patterns of leadership, solidarity, cohesion, conflict, accommodation, and 
cooperation. Prerequisites: PY 101 and PY 301. 

PY 341. BLACK PSYCHOLOGY 4 

Research methodology and alternatives within the confines of the black 
community will be the emphasis of this course. Examination of misconcep- 
tions related to the black community will also be given consideration. 
Prerequisites: PY 101 and/or SO 101. 

PY 351. INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

Application of psychology to the study of industrial and personnel problems, 
including such areas as human relations, selection, training, employee 
motivation, and morale. Prerequisite: PY 101. 

PY 360. INTRODUCTION TO EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

A survey course acquainting the student with the experimental analysis of 
behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the physiological processes involved 
in himian behavior. Prerequisites: MA 307 and/or MA 308. 



Departments of Instruction 75 

PY 361. ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

An advanced course utilizing laboratory facilities to investigate human 
and animal behavior. Emhasis will be placed upon the student quantifying 
various aspects of human and animal behavior. Prerequisite: PY 360. 

PY 401. HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 4 

A study of the theoretical systems, experiments and personalities involved 
in the development of psychology. Senior standing. 

PY 411. PRINCIPLES OF RESEARCH 4 

An introduction to research methods and their application to social science 
with special relationship to sociology and psychology. Prerequisites: PY 101 
and MA 307. 

PY 421. INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING 4 

A study of the theories, methods, and problems in counseling with particular 
relationship to educational settings. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 

PY 422. COUNSELING PRACTICUM 4 

A course designed to acquaint the student with understanding the practical 
applications of counseling techniques in a clinical setting. Prerequisite: PY 
421 and consent of instructor. 

PY 491. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH 1-4 

Senior majors in Psychology, Sociology or Social Work desirous of getting 
an independent course or research are encouraged to do so under direction 
of an advisor. Prerequisites: PY 411, MA 307 and senior standing. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Sociology) 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) 4 hours 

SO 211 (Introduction to Cultural Anthropology) 4 hours 

PY 301 (Social Psychology) 4 hours 

MA 307 (Statistical Methods I) 4 hours 

MA 308 (Statistical Methods II) 4 hours 

SO 310 (Dynamics of Socialization) 4 hours 

PY 411 (Principles of Research) 4 hours 

SO 421 (History and Theories of Sociology) 4 hours 

SO 451 (Population and Demography) 4 hours 

SO 461 (Ecology of Human Behavior) 4 hours 

40 hours 
Electives (Sociology, Social Work and Psychology) 5 hours 

(28 hours of upper division courses are required) _... 45 hours 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28 hours 

Required COGNATE: 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

BA 281 (Introduction to Economics) 4 hours 



76 Oakwood College 



MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY MINOR 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) 4 hours 

PY 301 (Social Psychology) _ 4 hours 

SO 310 (The Dynamics of Socialization) 4 hours 

SO 421 (History and Theories of Sociology) _. 4 hours 

16 hours 
Electives (Sociology, Social Work and Psychology) 12 hours 

(12 hours of upper division courses are required) 28 hours 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

SO 101. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 4 

An introduction to the field of sociology, to terms and concepts related to 
human behavior, and to the influences of social and cultural factors upon 
human behavior. 

SO 211. INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 4 

An introduction to the study of man as a total being, his culture and social 
organization, his inter-relationships with his habitat, and his bio-physical 
nature. 

SO 231. SOCIAL PROBLEMS 4 

An analysis of areas of social behavior considered to be problems in con- 
temporary American society. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 241. RACE RELATIONS 4 

A scientific approach to the study of racial elements in the population of 
the United States with particular emphasis on White and Negro groups. 
Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 291. RURAL AND URBAN SOCIETY 4 

Rural life and the place of rural people in our national life; rural social 
institutions. Also analysis of the modem urban community and its patterns 
of organization. Emphasis will be placed on the culture of cities and prob- 
lems facing the urban dweller. 

SO 301. THE SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANT BEHAVIOR 4 

Examination of criminality among juvenile and adult offenders. Also an 
analysis of law enforcement policies and a critical examination of legal, 
judicial and penological systems. 

SO 310. THE DYNAMICS OF SOCIALIZATION 4 

A critical examination of the process of becoming a group member as re- 
flected in studies in child rearing practices and in studies of assimilation and 
acculturation. The impact of various societal institutions on the individual 
will be discussed. 

SO 341. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION 4 

A study of the inter-relationship of society, culture and religion; and the 
conflicts and problems which emerge between religion and other social 
institutions. Prerequisite: SO 101. 



Departments of Instruction 



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SO 361. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 4 

The ethics of family relationships, changing trends and functions of the 
modern family. An attempt is made to bring the student into contact with 
facts, principles, attitudes and problems that are likely to play a part in 
marriage. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 421. HISTORY AND THEORIES OF SOCIOLOGY 4 

A survey of the historical background of sociology and its development as 
a field of behavioral science, emphasizing basic theories of sociology and 
their significance to sociological research. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 431. AFRO-AMERICAN CULTURE AND LIFE 4 

An in-depth study of Afro-American culture and life. Current theory and 
research relevant to the political, social, and economic processes involved 
in survival in the black community. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 451. POPULATION AND DEMOGRAPHY 4 

Demographic problems, population changes, trends in birth rates, mortality 
and fertility statistics; research-based demographic analysis as a means to 
study society. Prerequisites: MA 307 and PY 411. 

SO 461. ECOLOGY OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR 4 

The ecological aspects of human relations; ecological processes within the 
human community, urban and rural comparisons emphasized. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIAL WORK 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Social Work) 

SW 201 (Introduction to Social Welfare Policy I) 4 hours 

SW 202 (Introduction to Social Welfare Policy II) 4 hours 

SO 231 (Social Problems) 4 hours 

PY 321 (Abnormal Psychology) 4 hours 

SW 351 (Methods of Social Work Intervention I) 4 hours 

SW 352 (Methods of Social Work Intervention II) 4 hours 

SW 353 (Field Work with Community Agencies Part I) 4 hours 

SW 354 (Field Work with Community Agencies Part II) 4 hours 

SW 355 (Community Service Development) 4 hours 

SO 361 (Marriage and the Family) 4 hours 

40 hours 
Electives (Any two of SO 241, PY 319 or PY 491) 5 hours 

45 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) 4 hours 

SO 301 (The Sociology of Deviant Behavior) 4 hours 

MA 307 (Statistical Methods I) 4 hours 

ED 311 (Human Growth and Development) 4 hours 

PY 411 (Principles of Research) 4 hours 

PY 421 (Introduction to Counseling) 4 hours 

SO 431 (Afro-American Culture and Life) 4 hours 

28 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28 hours 



78 Oakwood College 

MINOR IN SOCIAL WORK 

SOCIAL WORK MINOR 

SW 201 (Introduction to Social Welfare Policy I) — . 4 hours 

SW 202 (Introduction to Social Welfare Policy II) 4 hours 

ED 311 (Human Growth and Development) 4 hours 

SW 351 (Methods of Social Work Intervention I) 4 hours 

SW 352 (Methods of Social Work Intervention II) 4 hours 

SW 353 (Field Work with Community Agencies I) 4 hours 

SW 354 (Field Work with Community Agencies II) 4 hours 

28 hours 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

SW 201-202. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY I, II 4,4 

A survey of social welfare programs, practices, policies and history that ac- 
quaints the student with the public and private services and programs de- 
signed to enhance the social development of our nation and to cope with the 
social problems of our society. 

SW 351-352. METHODS OF SOCIAL WORK INTERVENTION I, II 4,4 

A study of values, knowledge and principles of the social work profession 
and of casework, group work, community organization and other social work 
methods utilized in various social work agencies and social welfare settings. 
Prerequisite: SW 202. 

SW 353. FIELD WORK WITH COMMUNITY AGENCIES PART 1 4 

A laboratory type course designed to introduce the student to the profes- 
sional practice of social work by giving him contact with various agencies 
and facilities in the community. It is preferred that students have their own 
transportation. Prerequisite: SW 201. 

SW 354. FIELD WORK WITH COMMUNITY AGENCIES PART II 4 

A laboratory course designed to give the student actual working under qual- 
ified supervision. It is preferred that students have their own transportation. 
Prerequisites: SW 201 and SW 353. 

SW 355. COMMUNITY SERVICE DEVELOPMENT 4 

Study of methods for developing new services and institutions for the black 
community. Prerequisite: SW 352. 



Department of Professor: Blake (Head) 

.^ .^ -- Associate Professors: Fish, Grandison, Smith 

BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGY (Bi) 

The ciirriculum is designed to train the student in such a man- 
ner as to enable him to enter graduate or professional school; to fill 
positions in elementary and secondary schools and in clinical and 
biological laboratories. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 



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Departments of Instruction 79 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BIOLOGY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Biology) 

BI 121-122-123 (General Biology) ..-.- 4-4-4 hours 

BI 225 (Embryology) 5 hours 

BI 321 (Genetics) 4 hours 

BI 322 (Philosophy of Science) _ 3 hours 

BI 401-402-403 (Biology Seminar) 1-1-1 hours 

BI 421 (Systematic Botany) „ 4 hours 

BI 422 (General Physiology) 5 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Biology courses are required) 45 hours 

Required COGNATES: 

MA 111 (College Algebra) 4 hoiu-s 

MA 112 (Plane Trigonometry) 4 hours 

PH 111-112-113 (General Physics) 4-4-4 hours 

CH 111-112-113 (General Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

CH 301-302-303 (Organic Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

44 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) „ „ 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN BIOLOGY 

BIOLOGY MINOR 

BI 121-122-123 (General Biology) 4-4-4 hours 

BI 421 (Systematic Botany) 4 hours 

Electives . — 12 hours 

(8 hours of upper division Biology courses are required) 28 hours 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BI 101.102. THE LIFE SCIENCES 4,4 

This course is designed for non-science majors. It is a basic study of biologi- 
cal principles involving various plants and animals. A major objective is 
the presentation of the concept of man in his biological background. Three 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. Does not apply on a major 
or rainor. 

BI 111-112. HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 5-5 

The study of the structure and function of the human organism. Four 
hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. Does not apply on a major 
or minor, 

BI 121-122-123. GENERAL BIOLOGY 4-4-4 

A study of the basic principles of biology and their exemplification in 
plants cind animals. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 



80 Oakwood College 

Bl 221. MICROBIOLOGY 5 

The nature of bacteria and disease -producing organisms with their habits 
and methods of reproduction and the relation of these organisms to disease 
in the human body are studied. Four hours lecture, three hours laboratory 
each week. 

Bl 225. EMBRYOLOGY 5 

A study of the embryonic development of animals with emphasis on the 
developmental morphology of vertebrates. Three hours lectiu-e, six hours 
laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Bl 121-122-123. 

Bl 226. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 5 

A study of the comparative anatomy of the chordates with emphasis on the 
vertebrates. Detailed dissections of the shark and cat are made in the 
laboratory. Three hours lecture, six hoxu-s laboratory each week. Prereq- 
uisite: Bl 121-122-123. 

Bl 321. GENETICS 4 

A study of the principles of inheritance in living organisms. Three hours 
lecture, three hours laboratory each week. Prerequisites: Bl 121-122-123; 
CH 301-302-303. 

Bl 322. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 3 

A study of the scientific method as it relates to primary origins and present- 
day distributions of living things. Evidences from archeology, the physical 
and biological sciences are examined. Three hours lecture each week. 
Prerequisite: Bl 101-102 or Bl 121-122-123. 

Bl 331. HISTOLOGY 4 

A study of the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues and organs includ- 
ing references to their functions. Two hours lecture, six hoiu-s laboratory 
each week. Prerequisite: Bl 121-122-123. 

Bl 360. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 4 

A survey of invertebrate biology emphasizing physio-behavioral-ecological 
adaptations of major taxonomic groups. Field identification of local species 
is included. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. Prereq- 
uisites: Bl 121-122-123. 

Bl 401-402.403. BIOLOGY SEMINAR M-l 

A discussion of the methods of science, types and sources of biological 
literature, and methods of information retrieval. Research methods are 
studied and reports of topics from current literature are presented. One 
hour each week. These courses must be taken in sequence (Seniors only 
or by special permission of the instructor) . 

Bl 410. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY I 

Directed independent study in an approved area. The student will be re- 
quired to read widely on an assigned topic, follow research methods, and 
prepare a paper showing competence in and the extent of his study. Per- 
mission from the department chairman is required. 

Bl 421. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY 4 

The principles of the classification of plants with emphasis on the local flora. 
Two hours lecture, six hours laboratory each week. Prerequisite: Bl 121- 
122-123. 



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Departments of Instruction 81 

Bl 422-423. GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY 4-4 

The study of animal physiology relating structure to biochemical and 
biophysical processes. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. 
Prerequisites: BI 121-122-123; CH 301-302-303; and PH 111-112-113. 

Bl 425. GENERAL ECOLOGY 4 

A study of the basic principles of plant and animal ecology. Field trips 
to nearby areas illustrating these principles are a part of the laboratory. 
Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory each week. Prerequisite: BI 121- 
122-123. 

Bl 450. ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY 4 

The exact topic to be announced by the particular instructor. Topics may 
include: entomology, parasitology, symbiosis, microtechnique, herpetology, 
ornithology, mammalogy, radioecology, plant physiology, animal behavior, 
etc. Lecture hours and laboratory hours variable. Prerequisites: BI 121-122- 
123. 



Department of Adjunct Professor: Osborne 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION G^'jlbsl^a^ 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BA) 

The aim of this department is to provide a technical, Hberal, 
and ethical education which will equip young men and women 
with the skills and knowledge necessary for business and economic 
competence. The department also seeks to encourage qualified 
students to prepare for the teaching of business in the secondary 
school. 

Students planning to teach Bookkeeping and commercial sub- 
jects in high school must also minor in Secondary Education. 

The Department of Business Administration offers the B.S. 
degree in Business Administration. It is also possible to take up 
to 36 hours in Accounting. The required courses in the B.S. 
program are those recommended by the American Association of 
Collegiate Schools of Business. This program prepares men and 
women for denominational work, graduate work, or other areas of 
business. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Business Administration) 

BA 321, 322 (Intermediate Accounting) 4,4 hours 

BA 281,282 (Introduction to Economics) 4,4 hours 



82 Oakwood College 

BA 311 (Business Finance) „... 4 hours 

BA 381 or PY 351 (Principles of Business Management or 

Industrial Psychology) 4 hours 

BA 411 (Principles of Marketing) 4 hours 

BA 491 (Business Law) _ „ 4 hours 

MA 307 (Statistics) 4 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Business Administration are 
required) 



48 hours 



Required COGNATES: 

BA 111, 112 (Data Processing) 3,3 hours 

MA 111 (College Algebra) 4 hours 

MA 112 (Plane Trigonometry) 4 hours 

MA 211 (Survey of Calculus) 4 hours 

SC 111-112 (Elementary Typing) 2-2 hours 

SC 231 (Office Machines) ^ 3 hours 



25 hours 
MINOR (Mathematics or Accounting suggested) 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MINOR 

BA 121, 122, 123 (Principles of Accounting) 3,3,3 hours 

BA 281,282 (Introduction to Economics) „ 4,4 hours 

Electives (Upper Division) 11 hours 



28 hours 



MINOR IN ACCOUNTING 

ACCOUNTING MINOR 

BA 321-322 (Intermediate Accounting) 4-4 hours 

BA 341-342 (Cost Accounting) 4-4 hours 

BA 391 (Income Tax Accounting) 4 hours 

BA 421 (Advanced Accounting) 4 hours 

BA 431 (Principles of Auditing Procedures) ^ 4 hours 



28 hoiu*s 
DESCRfPTION OF COURSES 

BA 101. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 4 

A common sm^ey course in business is designed to give a general back- 
ground to the entire field of business and secretarial science. 

BA 111. INTRODUCTION TO DATA PROCESSING 3 

This is a course for the beginning student who desires to learn the principles 
and theory of data processing. Part of the quarter will be spent in theory 
and the rest will be in actual operation of IBM imit record equipment. 
$7.50 lab fee. 



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Departments of Instruction 83 

BA 112. INTERMEDIATE DATA PROCESSING 3 

Students will learn basic wiring principles and the FORTRAN IV pro- 
^ granuning language. Lab work is centered around the IBM 1620 computer. 

$5.00 lab fee. 

BA 113. PROGRAMMING 3 

Students who have successfully completed BA 111 & BA 112 will be eligible 
to continue developing skills in computer programming using FORTRAN 
and the IBM 1620. $5.00 lab fee. 

BA 121-122-123. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 3-3-3 

This is a basic course in bookkeeping and accounting theory. Emphasis is 
placed upon the accounting cycle for non-trading and trading businesses, 
partnerships, and corporations. 

BA 201. BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 4 

Specialized training in business usage and commercial correspondence is 
offered in this course. It is planned especially for business and secretarial 
students in areas of letter and report writing with heavy emphasis on 
grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Offered even-numbered years. 

BA 281.282. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 4.4 

A study in fundamentals of economics with application to industrial 
and social life. Factors of production, industrial organization, value, price 
wealth, taxation, and politics are studied. 

BA 311. BUSINESS FINANCE 4 

A preliminary course which deals with operation of private profit-seeking 
enterprises and the financial institutions common to the economy. Topics 
covered include the promotion of enterprises, risking of capital, problems 
of short, intermediate and long-term financing. The role of consumer 
credit in the financial structure and a resume of the institutions financing 
the consumer are also studied. (Prerequisite: BA 121, 122, 123.) 

BA 321-322. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 4-4 

The construction, analysis, and interpretation of financial statements, to- 
gether with related theory and practice. Two hours of classwork each 
week and four hours of laboratory. (Prerequisite: BA 121, 122, 123.) 

BA 341-342. COST ACCOUNTING 4-4 

This course treats cost accounting as a tool of management for manufactur- 
ing concerns. Both theory and practice are studied for job order, process, 
and standard cost systems. (Prerequisite: BA 321-322.) Offered odd- 
numbered years. 

BA 381. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 4 

A course covering the basic principles of business management including 
the organization of business in manufacturing and in merchandising. 
Budgeting, setting up of standards, and efficient use of both machines and 
men. 

BA 391. INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING 4 

Discussion, analysis, and application of current federal income tax laws to 
individuals, partnerships, and corporations. Training is given in the 
preparation of tax reports. Offered even-numbered years. 

BA 411. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 4 

This course covers marketing and business raanagement in the American 
economy; market institutions and functions; relation of marketing methods 



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84 Garwood College 

to other economic processes and existing economic conditions; the place and 
importance of marketing in modern economic organization. 

BA 421. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 4 

Accounting for partnerships, special sales procedures, consolidations, and 
fiduciaries. (Prerequisites: BA 321-322.) Offered odd-numbered years. 

BA 431. PRINCIPLES OF AUDITING PROCEDURE 4 

The purpose of this course is to help the student to understand the auditing 
part of the work of the public accountant, and to help him apply the 
methods of procedures followed in conducting an audit for a small or 
mediimi-sized concern. The procedures for the effective auditing of cash, 
receivables, inventories, other assets, liabilities, and proprietorship are 
studied with an above-average degree of care. The procedures to be followed 
in carrying out detailed audit systems are also considered in the course. 
Offered odd-numbered years. 

BA 441. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING 4 

A study of the accounting principles and practices involved in budgeting, 
recording and reporting for state and local governments and eleemosynary 
institutions. (Prerequisite: BA 421.) 

BA 491. BUSINESS LAW 4 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental 
principles of the laws of business so he may act intelligently and under- 
stand his rights, duties, and liabilities in ordinary business transactions. 
Contracts, negotiable instruments, sales, agency, property, corporations, 
landlord and tenant relationships, wills and legacies are covered. 



Department of Associate Professor: 

^ Banks (Head) 

BUSINESS EDUCATION AND Assistant Professor: Price 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE (SO 

The major goal of this department is two-fold: to prepare well- 
qualified teachers of business education for the Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist school system and public secondary schools by requiring the 
satisfactory completion of a curriculum that incorporates the proper 
balance in the areas of business administration, secretarial skills and 
knowledge, and ethical education which will equip young men and 
women with the skills and knowledge necessary for them to enter 
offices as stenographers, secretaries, and general office workers. 

The Department offers two programs for the Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree with majors in Business Education and in Secretarial 
Science. An Associate in Science program with emphasis in Secre- 
tarial Science is also offered, and the Associate in Science degree is 
presented at the completion of the two-year secretarial curriculum. 
A minor in Secretarial Science is also available. 

Students completing the Business Education program meet the 
requirements of the State of Alabama and are eligible for a Class B 



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Secondary Professional Certificate. All seniors are required to take 
the aptitude and advanced sections of the Graduate Records Exam- 
ination. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Business Education) 

SC 101-102-103 (Shorthand Theory and Dictation) 4-4-4 hours 

BA 121-122-123 (Principles of Accounting) 3-3-3 hours 

SC 141 (Records Management) 3 hours 

BA 201 (Business Communications) 4 hours 

SC 201A (Advanced Dictation) 2 hours 

SC 201B (Transcription) 2 hours 

SC 231 (Machine Calculations) 3 hours 

BA 281-282 (Introduction to Economics) 4-4 hours 

SC 321-322-323 (Advanced Typewriting and Duplicating) 2-2-2 hours 

BA 491 (Business Law) „ 4 hours 

53 hours 
Required COGNATE: 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 4 hours 

An additional course, BA 101, Introduction to the Business 
Professions, is required of students having no business training in 
high school. 

Fifty-seven hours are required for the Business Education 
major, which include ten hours of upper division credits in business 
administration and secretarial science subjects. A student desiring 
to qualify for a Class B Secondary Professional Certificate must 
complete the following professional teacher education courses (re- 
ferred to as the first minor of Secondary Education) which include 
an additional 25 upper division credits. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

(First Minor) 

ED 241 (Principles of Secondary Education) 4 hours 

ED 221 (Educational Psychology) 4 hours 

ED 311 (Human Growth and Development) 4 hours 

ED 328 (Methods and Materials of Teaching Business Education 

in the Secondary School, I) 4 hours 

ED 329 (Methods and Materials of Teaching Business Education 

in the Secondary School, II) 4 hours 

ED 341 (Audio- Visual Education or Elective) 4 hours 

ED 421 (Internship in Secondary School Teaching) 9 hours 

33 hours 



86 Oakwood College 

Four additional hours in the area of science are required and 
may be chosen from the following: 

HE 131 (Nutrition) 4 hours 

BI 121 (General Biology) 4 hours 

PH 111 (General Physics) 4 hours 

An additional two-hour course in the Humanities area is 
needed for Certification: either Diction or Developmental Reading. 

ELECTIVES: 

ED 261 (Libraries and Materials) 4 hours 

ED 351 (Philosophy and Foundations of Education) 4 hours 

ED 361 (Educational Tests and Measurements) 4 hours 

ED 401 (School Organization and Administration) 4 hours 

A second minor is required which may be chosen from the 
following: English, Home Economics, History, Sociology, Psychol- 
ogy, Accounting, etc. Twenty-eight hours are required. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Secretarial Science) 

SC 141 (Records Management) 3 hours 

SC 201A-202A-203A (Advanced Dictation) 2-2-2 hours 

SC 201B-202B-203B (Transcription) 2-2-2 hours 

SC 231 (Machine Calculations) 3 hours 

SC 301-302 (Secretarial Procedures and Administration) 4-4 hours 

SC 311-312-313 (Shorthand Reporting) 4-4-4 hours 

OR 

SC 411-412-413 (Machine Shorthand) 4-4-4 hours 

SC 321-322-323 (Advanced Typewriting and Duplicating) 2-2-2 hours 

SC 401 (Office Internship) 4 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Secretarial Science courses are 48 hours 

required) 

Required COGNATES: 

BA 121-122-123 (Principles of Accounting) 3-3-3 hours 

BA 281,282 (Introduction to Economics) ..._ 4,4 hours 

BA 201 (Business Communications) 4 hours 

21 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) ..„ ^ 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
SECRETARIAL SCIENCE MINOR 

SC 141 (Records Management) 3 hours 

SC 201A-202A-203A (Advanced Dictation) 2-2-2 hours 



^ Departments of Instruction 87 

^ SC 201B-202B-203B (Transcription) 2-2-2 hours 

SC 231 (Machine Calculations) 3 hours 

^ SC 321-322-323 (Advanced Typewriting) 2-2-2 hours 

Electives (Upper Division) 4 hours 



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ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

The Associate in Science degree in Secretarial Science is de- 
signed to prepare personnel to be qualified for executive secretarial 
and administrative assistant positions in business. The program pro- 
vides a background of cultural and academic education with the 
essential business skills and knowledge necessary for secretarial 
competence and is structured to enable the student to continue a 
four-year degree program in business teacher education without 
loss of credit. Credit for the last 48 hours of course work for the 
Associate in Science degree must be earned in residence at Oak- 
wood College. 

Course Number Course Description Hours 

First Year 

RE 111 or 101-102* Life and Teachings of Jesus or Bible Survey 4 or 6 

BA 121-122-123 Principles of Accounting 9 

EN 101-102-103 Freshman Composition 12 

SC 101-102-103 Shorthand Theory 12 

SC 111-112-113 Elementary and Intermediate Tj^pewriting 6 

SC 141 Records Management 3 

PE 101-102 Physical Education 2 

48 or 50 
Second Year 

RE 201 Fundamentals of the Christian Faith 4 

BA 201 Business Communications 4 

SC 201A-202A-203A Advanced Dictation 6 

SC 201B-202B-203B Transcription 6 

BA 281 Principles of Economics 4 

SC 231 Machine Calculations 3 

SC 301-302 Secretarial Procedures and Administration ..._ 8 

SC 321-322-323 Advanced Typewriting and Duplicating 6 

RE 331 The Gift of Prophecy 4 

Electives 4 

49 
TOTAL QUARTER HOURS 97 or 99 

* Students having two or more credits in high school Bible will take RE 111 — 
Life and Teachings of Jesus and ED 101 — Principles of Christian Education. 
NOTE: No grade below "C" may apply on courses in business administration, 
English, and secretarial science. 



88 Oakwood College 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

SC 101-102-103. SHORTHAND THEORY 4-4-4 

Presentation of the complete theory of Gregg Shorthand; rapid reading of 
shorthand plates; development of accurate and rapid writing of shorthand 
from dictation; development skills in the use of handling secretarial ma- 
terials; correlated English instruction; arrangement of material from short- 
hand notes and rapid transcription of shorthand notes in mailable form. Re- 
quirement first quarter: 40 to 60 words a minute over new material. Re- 
quirement second quarter: 60 to 80 words a minute over new material. 
Requirement third quarter: 80 to 100 words a minute over new material. 

SC 111-112. ELEMENTARY TYPEWRITING 2-2 

An introductory course with emphasis on basic theory and skills for per- 
sonal and vocational use. Five class periods each week. 

SC 113. INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING 2 

A continuation of the course SC 111-112. Special attention is given to more 
complex typing problems with emphasis on speed. Five class periods each 
week, 

SC 141. RECORDS MANAGEMENT 3 

Instruction and training are given in all phases of the management of busi- 
ness records. Practical application includes the five standard methods of 
filing — alphabetic, numeric, geographic, subject and chronologic. The prac- 
tice set method of instruction is used. 

SC 201A-202A-203A. ADVANCED DICTATION 2-2-2 

SC 201B-202B-203B. TRANSCRIPTION 2-2.2 

Prerequisites: SC 101-102-103 or demonstrated proficiency of 90 wpm. 
Professional competency in the ability to write and transcribe shorthand; 
emphasis on and extensive practice in the production of mailable tran- 
scription; office-style dictation; proofreading; efficient handling of dictation 
and transcription materials. Speed requirement at the end of first quarter, 
100 wpm for secretarial majors; 120 wpm for business education majors 
(five-minute writing). The second and third quarters give insight into the 
nature and significance of secretarial positions in medicine, science and 
technology, law, and international trade. Required speed at the end of third 
quarter is 120 wpm for five minutes with at least 95 percent accuracy. 

SC 231. MACHINE CALCULATIONS 3 

This course is designed to develop acquaintance with the most frequently 
used types of office machines and provides the basic skills used in funda- 
mental calculations. It deals with the aspect of calculation needed by the 
office worker and by the individual in the daily contact with mathematics. 
Emphasis is placed on rapid and accurate problem solving by use of business 
machines. Methods of presenting various units will be thoroughly discussed. 
Considerable practice will be given to solving problems in business and to 
constructing a course of study as the avenue for teaching this problem 
solving. 

SC 301-302. SECRETARIAL PROCEDURES AND ADMINISTRATION 4-4 

A terminal course dealing with professional ethics of an executive secretary. 
Consideration is given to the areas of office relations, appearance, attitudes, 
and office techniques. The student will be required to perform a variety of 
tasks that give practical application to the duties of a professional secretary. 
This course also provides background information necessary to those students 
taking the Certified Professional Secretaries Examination. 



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SC 311-312.313. SHORTHAND REPORTING 4-4-4 

The first two quarters of this course deal with rapid dictation and tran- 
scription of congressional and other technical material. Speed requirement, 
140 words per minute (five-minute timing). The third quarter deals with 
the secretary as a specialist. A specialized program of medical, legal, busi- 
ness, and industrial training is included to give the student a variety of 
experiences. This course will also give preparation for students taking the 
National Business Entrance Test. 

SC 321-322-323. ADVANCED TYPEWRITING AND DUPLICATING 2-2-2 

Prerequisites: SC 111-112-113 (beginning typewriting) or demonstrated 
proficiency of 50 net words per minute. Further development of speed and 
accuracy in typewriting; application of skill to letter arrangement; compo- 
sition of letters at the typewriter; business forms; tabulated reports and 
manuscripts; duplicating fundamentals using spirit, mimeograph, and offset 
machines. On-the-job practice as secretary in the general, technical, ac- 
counting, legal, and medical offices. Analysis of basic skill in typewriting 
followed by individual programs of remedial practice designed to improve 
typewriting skill. Speed-up procedures are used in the development of 
maximum typewriting skill. Required minimum speed at end of third 
quarter, 70 net words per minute. 

SC 401. OFFICE INTERNSHIP 4 

This course includes instruction and laboratory practice designed to give 
the student a working knowledge of the mechanics of certain office pro- 
cedures and techniques, including filing methods, calculating machine 
operation, and the use of duplicating and voice-writing equipment through 
actual office experience. 

SC 411-412-413. (ELECTIVE) MACHINE SHORTHAND 4-4-4 

The function of the shorthand reporter is to make, via a stenotype machine, 
a written record of everything said at a trial or a meeting and to furnish 
an accurate typewritten transcript. Court reporting requires a minimum 
speed of 200 words per minute for five minutes. Prerequisite: a typing 
speed of 60 words per minute, and a good background in English funda- 
mentals. Offered during even-numbered years. Alternate to SC 311-312-313. 



Department of Professors: Cooper, Richardson (Head) 

CHEMISTRY '"^"^ '^"'^ 

CHEMISTRY (CH) 



The curriculum is structured to give our students the rigorous 
training that will qualify them to fill positions in high schools as 
chemistry instructors, and in the chemical industry as chemists; 
to satisfy the course requirements for medicine, dentistry, nursing, 
home economics, etc. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 



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90 Oakwood College 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Chemistry) 

CH 111-112-113 (General Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

CH 301-302-303 (Organic Chemistry) _ 4-4-4 hours 

CH 321 (Quantitative Analysis) 4 hours 

CH 322, 323 (Physical Chemistry) „ 4,4 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Chemistry courses are required) 45 hours 

Chemistry majors preparing for medicine may delete CH 323 
and substitute MA 211 for MA 201-202-203. 

Required COGNATES: 

MA 111 (College Algebra) 4 hours 

MA 112 (Plane Trigonometry) 4 hours 

MA 201-202-203 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus) 4-4-4 hours 

PH 111-112-113 (General Physics) 4-4-4 hours 

32 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) „ „ 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

CHEMISTRY MINOR 

CH 111-112-113 (General Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

CH 321 (Quantitative Analysis) 4 hours 

CH 301-302-303 (Organic Chemistry) _ _... 4-4-4 hours 

28 hours 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

CH 101 •102-1 03. SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY 3-3-3 

A survey of inorganic, organic and biological chemistry for non-chemistry 
majors and minors. 

CH 111-112-113. GENERAL CHEMISTRY 4-4-4 

A sm^ey of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry with special 
emphasis on the working of problems and the relationship between atomic 
structiu-e and the chemistry of the elements. 

CH 201. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 

A study of the principles and methods of chemical analysis used in separat- 
ing and identifying the constituents of inorganic unknowns. Prerequisites: 
CH 111-112. 

CH 301-302-303. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 4-4-4 

A survey of organic chemistry. It includes a general treatment of the 
mechanisms of organic reactions, resonance theory, the molecular orbital 
theory, the physio-chemical basis of synthetic reactions, and an introduction 
to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and infra-red spectroscopy as 
analytical tools. Prerequisite: CH 113. 






Departments of Instruction 91 

CH 321. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 4 

The theory and practice of inorganic analytical chemistry, utilizing gravi- 
metric, volumetric, and instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisite: 
CH 113. 

CH 322.323.324. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 4.4.4 

A study of the fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, 
and quantum mechanics. Offered when required. Prerequisites: CH 113, 
PH 113, MA 211 or equivalent. 

CH 350. CHEMICAL INSTRUMENTATION 4 

Separation of organic mixtures by chromatographic methods. The theory 
and practice of organic structure analysis, utilizing IR and UV spectro- 
photometry, and NMR and Mass spectrometry. Offered when required. 
Prerequisites: CH 301-302-303. 

CH 401.402.403. BIOCHEMISTRY 4,4,4 

The chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, intermediary- 
metabolism, and certain physiological processes. Offered when required. 
Prerequisites: CH 301-302-303. 

CH 421. RESEARCH 1-4 

An original investigation in pure or applied chemistry under the guidance 
of the staff. Open to chemistry majors in their junior and senior years. 
Offered when required. 



Department of Professors: McDonald, Quirante (Head) 

Associate Professors: Hadley, Marshall 
Assistant Professors: Bliss, Brantley 



EDUCATION 



EDUCATION (ED) AND 
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (VE) 



The Department of Education embraces the discipHnes of 
elementary education, secondary education, health and physical 
education, and vocational education. The Department provides 
a teacher training program with a major in Elementary Education 
and a minor in Secondary Education. 

Degree Offered: The Department of Education offers a degree 
program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Elementary Educa- 
tion. 

Elementary Education Major: A major in Elementary Educa- 
tion includes a maximum of sixty quarter hours of professional 
courses in education. Candidates for the B.S. in elementary educa- 
tion are required also to have one academic minor in any of the 
subjects taught in the elementary grades. 



92 Oakwood College 

Required Cognate Courses: In addition to the general education 
requirements, students majoring in elementary education must ful- 
fill the minimum requirements of the State of Alabama for a Class 
B Elementary Professional Certificate, and of the Seventh -day 
Adventist denomination for a Standard Elementary Certificate. 

Secondary Education Minor: A minor in secondary education 
includes a minimum of 32 quarter hours of professional education. 
To qualify for teaching in the secondary schools, students should 
have one academic major and one academic minor in approved 
teaching areas in high school in addition to a secondary education 
minor. 

Required Cognate Courses: Students minoring in secondary 
education must fulfill the minimum requirements of the State of 
Alabama for a Class B Secondary Professional Certificate, and of 
the Seventh-day Adventist denomination for a Standard Secondary 
Certificate in addition to the general education requirements of the 
College. 

Admission to the Teacher Education Program: Education stu- 
dents with a major in elementary education or a minor in secondary 
education are required to make a formal application to the Teacher 
Education Council for admission to the Teacher Education Program. 
In order to be admitted to the Teacher Education Program, the stu- 
dent must have a minimum average GPA of 2.00, a proficiency in 
written and spoken English, intelligence, emotional stability, health, 
and a commitment to the teaching profession. Applications must be 
submitted not later than the Fall Quarter of the sophomore year. 

In order to continue in this program, students should maintain 
an over-all GPA of 2.25 in all subjects, a minimum GPA of 2.50 in 
their major, and 2.00 in minor subjects. Membership and participa- 
tion in the Student National Education Association is a basic re- 
quirement for admission to the Teacher Education Program. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor field of 
specialization. 

Application to Student Teaching Internship: In their junior 
year, education students must apply to the Teacher Education 
Council during the Spring Quarter for admission and placement to 
do their student teaching internship for the ensuing senior year. 
The student teaching program is scheduled normally for the Fall 
and Winter Quarters of the school year. 

Teacher Certification: Detailed information on teacher certifi- 
cation, by the Denomination and by the State of Alabama, are 
available in the TEACHER EDUCATION MANUAL published by 
the Department of Education of Oakwood College. 



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Departments of Instruction 



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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Elementary Education) 

ED 111 (Orientation to Teaching) 4 hours 

ED 221 (Educational Psychology) 4 hours 

ED 231 (Principles of Elementary Education) 4 hours 

ED 300 (Methodology and Techniques of Teaching 

in the Elementary School) 4 hours 

ED 301-309 (Methods and Materials of Teaching 

in the Elementary School) 27 hours 

ED 311 (Human Growth and Development) 4 hours 

ED 361 (Educational Tests and Measurements) 4 hours 

ED 411 (Internship in Elementary School Teaching) 9 hours 

60 hours 
Recommended Electives: 

ED 220 (Introduction to Special Education) 4 hours 

ED 251 (Fundamentals of Early Childhood Education) 4 hours 

ED 261 (Libraries and Materials) 4 hours 

ED 341 (Audio-Visual Education) 4 hours 

ED 351 (Philosophy and Foundations of Education) 4 hours 

ED 371 (Education of the Disadvantaged Child) 4 hours 

ED 401 (School Organization and Administration) 4 hours 

28 hours 
MINOR (To be chosen from subject areas taught in 

elementary school) 28 hours 



MINOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

MINOR (Secondary Education) 

ED 111 (Orientation to Teaching) 4 hours 

ED 221 (Educational Psychology) 4 hours 

ED 241 (Principles of Secondary Education) 4 hours 

ED 311 (Human Growth and Development) 4 hours 

ED 320 (Methodology and Techniques of Teaching 

in the Secondary School) 4 hours 

ED 321-330 (Methods and Materials of Teaching in the 

Secondary School (in major or minor) 4 hours 

ED 421 (Internship in Secondary School Teaching) 9 hours 

33 hours 

Recommended Electives: 

ED 261 (Libraries and Materials) 4 hours 

ED 341 (Audio- Visual Education) 4 hours 

ED 351 (Philosophj^ and Foundations of Education) 4 hours 

ED 361 (Educational Tests and Measurements) 4 hours 

ED 401 (School Organization and Administration) 4 hours 



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

ED 101. PRINCIPLES OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 2 

A study of the fundamental principles, theories and aims of Christian 
education. 

ED 111. ORIENTATION TO TEACHING 4 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the 
principles and procedures of teaching; including an overview of the Ameri- 
can School system, and the preparation and qualities essential for successful 
teaching in public and private schools. Occupational and educational 
guidance will be provided. Students will perform class observations and 
other duties as teacher-aids. 

ED 220. INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION 4 

This course acquaints prospective teachers and professional workers with 
the characteristics and problems of exceptional children and youth, includ- 
ing: the mentally retarded and advanced; the emotionally maladjusted; and 
those having visual, hearing, speech or other physical handicaps. 

ED 221. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 4 

A study of the nature of teaching and learning and the fundamentals in- 
volved in the learning processes. The course aims to aid prospective 
teachers in gaining a better understanding of children and adolescents — 
through case studies. The course is designed to acquaint the students with 
the psychological principles involved in successful teaching. Prerequisite: 
PY 101. 

ED 231. PRINCIPLES OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 4 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the 
principles and procedures employed in the organization and management 
of an elementary classroom. Opportunity is provided for observing, assisting, 
and participating in laboratory classroom activities. 

ED 241. PRINCIPLES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION 4 

A course designed to give students an insight into and an understanding of 
the work of the teacher. The course includes a study of the principles 
governing the objectives, organization and operation of secondary schools, 
as well as the problems of guidance and classroom management. Students 
will be given opportunity to observe, to participate, and to assist in labora- 
tory classrooms. 

ED 251. FUNDAMENTALS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 4 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the 
principles and procedures employed in the organization, management, and 
supervision of a kindergarten or nursery school. Prerequisite: ED 231. 

ED 261. LIBRARIES AND MATERIALS 4 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the use and functions of 
a library and its resources. It will survey library organization, services, 
processes and materials. Fundamentals of classification, basic reference mate- 
rials and general print and non-print materials will be studied. 

ED 271. SURVEY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 4 

An overview study of the physical, mental, and emotional development of 
humans from birth through senescense with special relevance to the nursing 
cycle. 



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ED 300. METHODOLOGY AND TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 

A block of general methods and materials common to most areas of teaching 
in the elementary schools. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 
Program. 

ED 301-309. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING 
IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

A series of courses in methods and materials peculiar to or generally used in 
teaching particular subject matter. Elementary majors will be required 
to take the methods courses which follow. Prerequisites: ED 300 and 
Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 

ED 301. METHODS IN TEACHING BIBLE AND SOCIAL STUDIES 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2 

ED 302. FOUNDATIONS OF READING 3 

ED 303. READING DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIATION 3 

ED 304. READING IN THE CONTENT AREA 2 

ED 305. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 3 

ED 306. METHODS IN TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 2 

ED 307. METHODS IN TEACHING MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 

ED 308. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ART 4 

ED 309. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MUSIC 4 

Required of all elementary education majors. 

ED 311. HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 4 

A study of the physical, mental, emotional and social development of the 
individual from conception through adolescence with particular emphasis 
on normal adaptation to change and learning processes. Observation and 
laboratory experiences are required. 

ED 320. METHODOLOGY AND TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING 

IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 4 

A block of general methods and materials common to most areas of teaching 
in the elementary schools. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education 
Program. 

ED 321-330. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

A series of courses in methods and materials relevant to or generally used 
in teaching specific subject matter, one of which must be selected either in 
their major or minor teaching area. Prerequisite: ED 320, and admission 
to the Teacher Education Program. (The teaching of the Secondary 
Methods courses is the responsibility of the respective academic depart- 
ments.") 

ED 321. METHODS IN TEACHING BIBLE AND RELIGION 

IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 4 

ED 322. METHODS IN TEACHING ENGLISH 

IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 4 



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Oakwood College 



ED 323. METHODS rN TEACHING HISTORY 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 324. METHODS IN TEACHING MATHEMATICS 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 325. METHODS IN TEACHING BIOLOGY 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 326. METHODS IN TEACHING MUSIC 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 327. METHODS IN TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 328. METHODS IN TEACHING BUSINESS SUBJECTS. I 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 329. METHODS IN TEACHING BUSINESS SUBJECTS. II 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 330. METHODS IN TEACHING READING 
IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 

ED 341. AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION 

A study of the principles, aims, and uses of educational media; practical 
application of theory and principle. 

ED 351. PHILOSOPHY AND FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 

A study of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of 
American education. Prerequisite: ED 231 or ED 241. 

ED 361. EDUCATIONAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS 

A course designed to provide functional knowledge of the meaning, use, 
and operation of tests and measurements in education. The role of evalua- 
tion in classroom instruction, the development of standardized tests, teacher- 
made tests, and other types of tests, as well as the grading system are 
studied. Prerequisites: ED 221, MA 101 or its equivalent, and an apprecia- 
tion for figures. 

ED 371. EDUCATION OF THE DISADVANTAGED CHILD 4 

A study of the special characteristics and needs of children from poverty- 
stricken communities and ways of teaching them. 

ED 401. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 4 

A basic professional course designed to teach students about the essential 
elements in the organization and administration of the public system of 
education as well as that of church-related schools. 

ED 411. INTERNSHIP IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING 9 

A course designed to give students opportunity for the application of teach- 
ing theories in the classroom. Students will be involved in observation, 
conferences, and full participation in a teaching situation on an intern- 
ship basis under the supervision of competent cooperating teachers and col- 
lege supervisors. The course requires the following: 1 ) attendance at weekly 
seminars; 2) membership in pre-professional organization (the S.N.E.A.); 
3) a non-registration in other courses meeting before 3:00 P.M. during the 
quarter of internship. Prerequisites: ED 300, ED 301-309, and approval of 
application to do Internship Program by the Teacher Education Coimcil. 



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Departments of Instruction 103 

the basic physiological processes. The health instructions found in the writ- 
ings of Mrs. E. G. White are given special emphasis. 

PE 301. ANALYSIS OF INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 3 

Organization and administration of individual sports, such as archery, bad- 
minton, golf, tennis, track and field, etc. 

PE 305. 306. 307. OFFICIATING IN TEAM SPORTS 1,1,1 

Theory and practice in officiation at team sports, interpretation of rules, 
officiating techniques, examinations and ratings. Prerequisite: Previous 
experience in playing basketball, flag football or field hockey, softball and 
volleyball. All students in these classes will be assigned to officiate for 
intramural programs of the College. 

PE 310. FIRST AID INSTRUCTOR AND ATHLETIC INJURIES 3 

Covers the requirements for the standard and advanced First Aid Certificate. 
Includes additional material in athletic injuries and civil defense activities. 

PE 320. HEALTH EDUCATION IN SCHOOLS 3 

An introduction to school health education with study into the basic issues 
and problems of school health. 

PE 330. METHODS OF TEACHING PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS 3 

This course is to prepare elementary majors or secondary minors in the 
basic physical education concepts so as to aid them in teaching physical 
education at the elementary or secondary school level. Methods and mate- 
rials, graded activities in games of low organization, team games, self-testing 
and safety measures, observation and testing of elementary school children 
will be scheduled. This course is required of all elementary majors and 
secondary education minors who elected P. E. and Health as a second minor. 

PE 340. PRINCIPLES AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 

The relationship of the field of physical education to modern education 
theory. The study into details of the organization of physical education 
activities and classification of pupils, and emphasis on the arrangement and 
construction of equipment and planning of school programs suitable to 
denominational schools. 



Department of Associate Professors: Harvey, Ross 

_ ____^^___ _-,-_, Assistant Professors: Barham, 

HISTORY AND Bames (Head) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

HISTORY (HI). POLITICAL SCIENCE (PS) AND GEOGRAPHY (GE) 



The Department of History and Political Science comprises 
areas of study in the various fields of history, political science, and 
geography. Courses in history are geared to meet the questions of 
the past and the problems of the contemporary world in areas of 
American, Latin American, European, and African studies, as well 



104 Oakwood College 

as in studies relating to the development of the Christian church. 
Political science courses are built around the democratic concept 
of government, diplomatic relationships, and international view- 
points. Geography consists of a survey of physical and cultural 
relationships. 

Students entering this department in the major and minor 
areas are advised to note the requirements as hereinafter listed. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (History) 

HI 101 (Western Civilization I) 4 hours 

HI 102 (Western Civilization II) 4 hours 

HI 211 (U.S. History I) or HI 151 (The Americas) 4 hours 

HI 212 (U.S. History II) or HI 152 (The Americas) 4 hours 

HI 314 (Denominational History) 4 hours 

HI 401 (Research Seminar) 4 hours 

PS 211 (American Government) 4 hours 

Electives (excluding Political Science Courses) 17 hours 

(17 hours of upper division History courses are 

required. 12 hours of non-American studies are required.) 

45 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) _ _ _ - 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

HISTORY MINOR 

HI 101, HI 102 or HI 211, HI 212 or HI 151, HI 152 8 hours 

PS 211 or GE 201 or HI 165 _ _... _ „... 4 hours 

HI 314 (Denominational History) 4 hours 

Electives (Upper Division) ...„ ^ 12 hours 

28 hours 

HISTORY 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
American Studies 

HI 151«152. THE AMERICAS 4.4 

A general survey coiu-se dealing with the high points of the history of the 
United States, Canada, and Latin America from the time of discovery to the 
present. 

HI 165. THE NEGRO IN AMERICA 4 

A survey of the black experience in America from the sixteenth century 
to the present 



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Department of Assistant Professors: 
.,„.-_.- ^ ^,«, Montgomery, Roddy (Head), Stafford 

HEALTH AND 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE) 

MINOR IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Minor in Health and Physical Education 

PE 120 or 121 (Flag Football or Field Hockey) 1 hour 

PE 122 (Basketball) 1 hour 

PE 126 (Softball) 1 hour 

PE 128 (Volleyball) 1 hour 

PE 210 (Lifesaving) 2 hours 

PE 229 (Beginning Equitation) „ 1 hour 

PE 237 (Wilderness Campcraft) 1 hour 

PE 245 (Tennis) - „ 1 hour 

PE 260 (Golf) 1 hour 

PE 301, 302, 303 (Analysis of Individual Sports) 1,1,1 hour 

PE 305, 306, 307 (Officiating in Team Sports) 1,1,1 hour 

PE 310 (First Aid Instructor and Athletic Injuries) 3 hours 

PE 320 (Health Education in Schools) 3 hours 

PE 330 (Methods of Teaching Physical Education 

in Elementary and Secondary Schools) 3 hours 

PE 340 (Principles and Administration of Physical Education) 3 hours 



28 hoiirs 

ACTIVITY COURSES 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
PE 101-A. PHYSICAL CONDITIONING (MEN) 
PE 101-B. SLIMNASTICS (WOMEN) 
PE 102-A. BEGINNING SWIMMING (MEN) 
PE 102-B. BEGINNING SWIMMING (WOMEN) 
PE102-AA. ADVANCED BEGINNING SWIMMING (MEN) 
PE 102-BB. ADVANCED BEGINNING SWIMMING (WOMEN) 
PE 107-A. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING (MEN) 
PE 107-B. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING (WOMEN) 
PE 112-A. ADVANCED SWIMMING (MEN) 
PE 112.B. ADVANCED SWIMMING (WOMEN) 



102 Oakwood College 

*PE 120. FLAG FOOTBALL (MEN) I 

*PE 121. FIELD HOCKEY (WOMEN) I 

''PE 122. BASKETBALL I 

*PE 126. SOFTBALL I 

*PE 128. VOLLEYBALL I 

PE 140. ARCHERY I 

PE 150. BADMINTON I 

PE 210. LIFESAYING 2 

Prerequisite: PE 107-A/B. 

PE 215. TRACK AND FIELD I 

PE 229. BEGINNING EQUITATION I 

Knowledge and skill in handling, training and riding horses are developed 
to a level sufficient to support a recreational interest and to assure one's own 
safety and that of others. 

PE 237. WILDERNESS CAMPCRAFT I 

Introduction to basic camping skills and equipment needed to enjoy the 
outdoors away from modem conveniences. 

PE 239. ADVANCED EQUITATION I 

Knowledge and skill in handling, training and riding horses for useful work 
and pleasure showing. 

PE 245. TENNIS I 

*PE 250, 251. GYMNASTIC TEAM 1,1 

(Admission to PE 250 will be based on satisfactory performance of try-out 
requirements for team membership.) 

PE 260. GOLF I 

PE 270. WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR 2 

Prerequisite: PE 210. 

PE 275. TUMBLING AND ELEMENTARY APPARATUS I 

Basic skills emphasized on trampoline, parallel bars, rings, unevens and 
balance beam. 

PE 280. WILDERNESS TRAVEL AND SURVIVAL I 

A course designed to introduce individuals to the natural world in such ways 
that they can enjoy it fully and safely with minimum equipment. Prereq- 
uisite: PE 237. 



*Team Activities 



THEORY COURSES 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PE 211. HEALTH PRINCIPLES 2 

A practical study of the principles of healthful living, including a study of 



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Departments of Instruction 99 

short theme. The friendly letter, the business letter, and the longer com- 
position and report are emphasized. 

EN 111. DEVELOPMENTAL READING 2 

This course is intended to help the student develop and improve his reading 
ability. The course may be repeated but without credit. The class will 
meet four periods a week. 

EN 112. ADVANCED READING SKILLS 2 

This course will emphasize flexible rates of reading for various types of 
reading, stress vocabulary power through contexual, advanced structural 
procedures and semantic variations, and relate present class demands to a 
wider scope of organized literature. There are two hours in class and one 
in laboratory. Prerequisite: EN 111. 

EN 201. WORLD LITERATURE I 4 

An intensive study of selected masterpieces from the Old Testament, the 
Ancient East, Greece, Rome, Medieval Europe, and Africa. Prerequisites: 
EN 101-102-103. While not required. Western Civilization is recommended 
as a prerequisite. 

EN 202. WORLD LITERATURE II 4 

A study of world masterpieces, beginning with the Renaissance and con- 
tinuing as far as possible into the present. Attention will be given to some 
of the writings of minority groups. While desirable, it is not necessary that 
EN 201 be a prerequisite to this course. Prerequisite: EN 101-102-103. 
While not required, Western Civilization is recommended as a prerequisite. 

EN 210. DICTION 2 

The purpose of this course is to build the student's vocabulary and give 
him an understanding of the etymology of familiar words, the methods of 
word formation in English, common Latin and Greek roots, and prefixes 
and suffixes, resulting in the ability to use words precisely and effectively. 

EN 250. ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS 2 

A course designed for those seniors who did not pass the English Proficiency 
Test given in the spring quarter of their junior year. In it the basic 
mechanics of sentence and paragraph structvire will be reviewed, until the 
student can demonstrate his ability to write acceptable standard English. 

EN 271-272-273. ENGLISH AND WORLD LITERATURE - SURVEY 4-4-4 

A year-long course designed to be taken in sequence during the sophomore 
year by English majors and minors as a prerequisite to period and non- 
literary courses to be pursued during the junior and senior years. It 
combines English and world literature, both by genre and chronology. The 
influence of one author upon another is emphasized, and some attention is 
given to affective movements in world history. Students majoring in 
related areas are welcome to enroll. 

EN 301,302. AMERICAN LITERATURE - SURVEY 4,4 

301 : Colonial Period to the Civil War. (John Smith through Sidney Lanier) . 
302: Civil War through World War I. (Walt Whitman through William 
Dean Howells) . 

EN 305. BIBLICAL LITERATURE 4 

A survey is made of the prose and poetical masterpieces of the Bible; a 
study of the Bible as a masterpiece of literature. 



100 Oakwood College 

EN 320. BLACK LITERATURE 4 

A survey designed to introduce the student to literature written by black 
writers. Although other nationalities will be represented, the major em- 
phasis will be upon literature produced in the United States. 

EN 323. MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 4 

Post-World War I to the present. Emphasis on British and American 
authors, but contemporary continental authors are also included. Pre- 
requisite for English majors and minors. EN 271-272-273 or 301,302. 

EN 351. CREATIVE WRITING 4 

Designed to meet the needs of those interested in developing skills in 
creative writing, non-fiction, and poetry. 

EN 411. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 4 

A study of the development of the language, with emphasis on the sound 
system and grammar; application of historical insights into problems of 
teaching English. 

EN 413. DESCRIPTIVE ENGLISH GRAMMAR 4 

An intensive study of English grammar from both the traditional and the 
linguistic points of view. 

EN 421. MILTON 4 

A study of John Milton's better-known major poems, together with some 
attention to selected prose. 

EN 441. MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE LITERATURE 4 

English literature: Middle Ages through the Elizabethan Age. 

EN 451. ROMANTICISM 4 

Survey of the prose and poetry of the period 1785 - 1837 with special at- 
tention to the writings of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Byron, and 
Scott. 

EN 461. VICTORIANISM 4 

A survey of the period from 1837 through 1901, with special attention to 
the writings of Tennyson, Dickens, Arnold, Browning, Carlyle, Kipling, 
and others. 

EN 490. SEMINAR IN ENGLISH I 

A seminar in which senior English majors will study current problems and 
developments in the broad field of English language and literature. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

CO 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 4 

A study of the basic principles of speech with particular emphasis given to 
delivery, speech composition, and oral interpretation. 

CO 331. JOURNALISM 4 

The principles of news reporting and elementary journalism are studied. 
Firsthand experience is gained in writing newspaper articles and in news 
reporting. 



Departments of Instruction 97 

ED 421. INTERNSHIP IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING 9 

A course designed to give students opportunity to apply the theories and 
principles of teaching in an actual classroom situation. Students will en- 
gage in observation, conferences, and full participation in teaching on 
an internship basis under the supervision of competent cooperating teachers 
and college supervisors. The course requires the following: 1) attendance at 
weekly seminars; 2) membership in a pre-professional organization (the 
S.N.E.A.); 3) non-registration in other courses meeting before 3:00 P.M. 
during the quarter of internship. Prerequisites: ED 320, completion of one 
of the Secondary Methods and Materials courses in the student's major or 
minor field of specialization, and approval of application to do Internship 
Program by the Teacher Education Council. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

VE 101. BRICKMASONRY 4 

Principles of masonry and concrete work, estimating materials. Laboratory 
practice with common types of masonry. 

VE 102. MECHANICAL DRAWING 4 

Orthographic projection, pictorial drawing, sectional and auxiliary views, 
conventional representations, and dimensioning. 

VE 103. GENERAL HORTICULTURE 4 

A basic course for the general student who is interested in country living. 
A study of the principles of vegetable and fruit culture and landscape de- 
sign. Lectures and field work will be coordinated. 



Department of Associate Professors: F. Davis, Winslow 

BiB.B.«»aa«»aa A>.a^ Assistant Professors: 0. Davis, Dykes. 

ENGLISH AND Mulrame (Head) 

LITERATURE instructors: Brantley, Clark, Gooding 

ENGLISH (EN) AND COMMUNICATIONS (CO) 



The purpose of the Enghsh department is to train the student 
to express himself correctly and effectively, to understand and 
appreciate the best literature, and to impart such skill and appre- 
ciation to others. Incoming Freshmen are classified either by their 
ACT scores in English or by a test administered on campus. Those 
whose scores indicate weakness in English will be required to enroll 
in EN 100, a course which gives two hours credit and meets four 
days a week. Upon completion of this course, the student will enroll 
in the EN 101-102-103 sequence, and continue until all three are 
completed. 



98 Oakwood College 

Unless a student has to take EN 100, he is expected to complete 
EN 101-102-103 by the end of the freshman year. 

If a student has to repeat EN 101-102-103, he is to remove the 
deficiency by the end of his sophomore year. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (English) 

EN 301,302 (Survey of American Literature) .— 4,4 hours 

EN 323 (Modern and Contemporary Literature) 4 hours 

EN 271,272,273 (Survey of English and World Literature) 4,4,4 hours 

EN 411 (Descriptive English Grammar) 4 hours 

EN 413 (History of the English Language) 4 hours 

EN 490 1 hour 

Three of the seven (EN 351, EN 320, EN 441, EN 451, 

EN 461, EN 305, EN 421) 12 hours 

45 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

HI 321 or 322 (History of England I or II) 4 hours 

CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 4 hours 

CO 331 (Journalism) 4 hours 

12 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

ENGLISH MINOR 

EN 271-272-273 (Survey of English and World Literature) 4,4,4 hours 

EN 301,302 (Survey of American Literature) 4,4 hours 

EN 331 (Journalism) 4 hours 

EN 411 (Descriptive English Grammar) 4 hours 

28 hours 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

EN 100. BASIC ENGLISH 2 

This course is required of all students who fail in the English Placement 
Test. 

EN 101-102-103. FRESHMAN COMPOSITION 4-4.4 

The course deals with the fundamentals of writing, reading, speaking, and 
listening, with special emphasis on the sentence, the paragraph, and the 



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Departments of Instruction 111 

HE 431. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF FOOD SYSTEMS 4 

A study of organization, management, personnel relationships, equipment 
selection, maintenance, and layout in institutional food service. Two class 
hours each week. Laboratory experience in college and hospital food 
service by arrangement. 

HE 441. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HOME ECONOMICS 1-4 

Individual research. Limited to majors. Prior approval by Department 
Chairman, 



Department of 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (IN) 



MINOR IN BLACK STUDIES 

Black Studies Minor 

HI 165 (The Negro in America) 4 hours 

RE 211 (The Black Liturgy — An Historical Analysis) 4 hours 

EN 320 (Black Literature) .— 4 hours 

PY 341 (Black Psychology) 4 hours 

IN 400 (Independent Research) 4 hours 

Electives (from SO 241, MU 301, SW 355, HI 364, 

ED 371 and SO 431) 8 hours 



28 hours 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

IN 201. HUMANITIES (For music majors only) 5 

A five hour course combining experience and activities with materials, con- 
cepts and cultural essences in the visual arts, literature and music. Because 
of the nature of the music curriculum this course is geared to the needs of 
music majors only. 

IN 400. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH 4 

The student will engage in a scholarly pursuit of knowledge related to black 
people involving his major field. The course should be taught by a teacher 
whom the student chooses as his advisor. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



112 Oakwood College 

Departmen+ of Assistant Professors: Blake (Head), Dobbins 

MATHEMATICS '"^"" "^ ^^^'°^^ 

AND PHYSICS 

MATHEMATICS (MA) AND PHYSICS (PH) 



The specific objectives of this department are in agreement 
with the general objectives of the college. 

Mathematics may be classified according to two general 
categories, pure mathematics and applied mathematics. Pure 
mathematics is very abstract, and proof (in the sense of a deductive 
system) is its most important concern. On the other hand, applied 
mathematics has arisen out of attempts to solve problems in the 
natural sciences and, in particular, the physical sciences. This 
department proposes to present these two points of view as a com- 
bined and unified whole. 

The department further proposes to develop an appreciation 
by the student of the fact that the One who created and upholds the 
universe also made the integers and gave man the mental power 
and the will to develop the rest of what is called mathematics. 

Those who plan to teach in secondary schools must also minor 
in Education, and meet the requirements for teacher certification. 

Mathematics majors are encouraged to minor in at least one of 
the following subjects: chemistry, physics, or business administra- 
tion. 

French or German must be selected to fulfill the foreign 
language requirement. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Mathematics) 

MA 201-202-203 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus) _ 4-4-4 hours 

MA 301 (Linear Algebra) . _ _ 4 hours 

MA 310-311 (Analysis) 4-4 hours 

MA 401-402 (Advanced Calculus) _ 4-4 hours 

MA 411-412 (Introduction to Modem Algebra) - 4-4 hours 

MA 419 (Real Analysis) 4 hours 

Electives „... 1 hour 

(24 hours of upper division Mathematics courses are required) 45 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) „... 28-32 hours 



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Departments of Instruction 109 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) or 

SO 101 (Principles of Sociology) 4 hours 

PY 351 (Industrial Psychology) 4 hours 



63 hours 



Additional courses should be chosen to meet the current requirements of the 
American Dietetic Association according to area of specialization. (Consult 
Advisor) . 

MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 

Three routes are available to students wishing to prepare for a 
career in professional dietetics, 1 ) a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Home Economics — Concentration in Food 
and Nutrition followed by an internship by the American Dietetic 
Association, 2) an integrated four-year undergraduate program in 
which the internship is provided in the last two years, or 3) follow- 
ing the bachelor's degree a pre-planned two-year work-study pro- 
gram approved by the American Dietetic Association. It is essential 
that the student consult with an advisor in the department of home 
economics at the beginning of his freshman year, and preferably 
while in the secondary school. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

HE 111. FOOD PREPARATION 4 

The selection, care, composition, and preparation of foods. 

HE 121. MEAL PLANNING 4 

Menu planning, marketing, meal preparation and service. Three class 
hours and one laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: HE 111, or by 
approval. 

HE 131. NUTRITION 4 

Basic principles of human nutrition, including nutrients and allowances for 
various ages and normal stress conditions. Carries credit toward the general 
education requirement in science. 

HE 141. TEXTILES 2 

A detailed study of the fabrics used in clothing and home decoration, with 
particular emphasis on modern synthetics and the popular wash-and-wear 
fabrics. A study of the structure, decoration, fiber content, and appropriate 
and artistic use of cmrent fabrics. 

HE 151-152. CLOTHING SELECTION AND CONSTRUCTION 4-4 

Artistic and economic factors are studied and applied to clothing for the 
family. Emphasis is placed on planning, buying, alteration, cost, care and 
renovation of clothing. This course offers students opportunities in con- 
struction of garments for the family, using patterns to develop speed and 
confidence. Prerequisite HE 141, or by approval. 

HE 201. ART IN LIFE 4 

Designed to develop an aesthetic appreciation and understanding of art 
principles as used in the home and clothing. Personal and home problems 
considered. 



110 Oakwood College 

HE 211. SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS 2 

A course designed to develop an understanding of the current social code 
for both men and women and to provide experience in its application to 
college life, home and community living. Acceptable modes of interacting 
in social and professional situations are presented. 

HE 221. HOME MANAGEMENT 4 

A study of management of time and energy, finance, food, and clothing, 
health and recreation, in homemaking and family life. 

HE 231. EQUIPMENT AND HOME CARE 4 

A study of kitchen planning and of the buying, operation, and care of 
electric and gas appliances and other articles of equipment used in home 
management. 

HE 301. EXPERIMENTAL FOODS 4 

Research methods applied to individual and class problems in food prepara- 
tion. Prerequisites: HE 111, 121, and CH 101-103. 

HE 321. ADVANCED NUTRITION 4 

A study of the principles of normal nutrition in the world field as applied 
to individuals of all ages. There are three hours in class and one in labora- 
tory. Prerequisites: HE 111, 121, and 141, and Chemistry 101-102, or by 
approval. 

HE 331. DIET THERAPY 4 

The principles of nutrition applied to physiological conditions altered by 
disease and abnormalities. Three class periods and one laboratory each 
week. Prerequisite: HE 321, 

HE 341. HOME MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 4 

Cooperative living in homemaking groups in the home management house. 
Experience is given in management, accounting, food preparation and serv- 
ice, aesthetic arrangements and entertaining. Charges are based on prevail- 
ing food costs. Registration required in the department office one quarter in 
advance. Prerequisites: HE 111, 121, 131, 201 and 221. 

HE 351. TAILORING 4 

Principles involved in making suits and coats for women. Open only to 
those who show skill in the construction of garments. Prerequisites: HE 
141, 151, or by approval. Offered even-numbered years. 

HE 401. DRESS DESIGN 4 

A course involving principles of draping and flat pattern design and their 
practical applications in sewing. Stress on current construction techniques 
and individualized fitting. 

HE 411. INTERIOR DESIGN 4 

A study of the art of creating beautiful and functional arrangements of 
furnishings and decorations inside the modern home. The designing of 
interiors which are distinctive, yet economical. A detailed study of the 
buying and artistic use of such items as china, glassware, silver, and furni- 
ture. Prerequisite: HE 201, or by approval. Offered odd-niunbered years. 

HE 421. QUANTITY FOOD MANAGEMENT 4 

A study of the quantity food purchasing, production, and service. Two 
classes per week and six laboratory hours in college and hospital food 
service by arrangement. 



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Departments of Instruction 107 

GEOGRAPHY 

DESCRIPTION Of COURSES 

GE 201. PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY 4 

Physical, cultural, and economic geography surveyed. Cognate for education 
majors. 



Department of Assistant Professor: Davis (Head) 

Mt^m.M^ w^^m.M^m.Mw^^ Instructor: Taylor 

HOME ECONOMICS 

HOME ECONOMICS (HE) 



The objectives of the Home Economics Department are to 
develop a realization of the scope of Home Economics Education, 
to teach standards of healthful living, to increase the competence of 
prospective teachers, dietitians, and home economists and to prepare 
students for opportunities in various areas of Home Economics. 

No grade below "C" may apply on a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Home Economics) 

HE 111 (Food Preparation) 4 hours 

HE 121 (Meal Planning) „ „ 4 hours 

HE 131 (Nutrition) „ 4 hours 

HE 141 (Textiles) 2 hours 

HE 151-152 (Clothing Selection and Construction) 4-4 hours 

HE 201 (Art in Relation to Home and Clothing) 4 hours 

HE 221 (Home Management) „ 4 hours 

ED 311 (Human Growth and Development) 4 hours 

HE 341 (Home Management in Residence) 4 hours 

HE 421 (Quantity Food Management) 4 hours 

Ellectives 6 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Home Economics courses are 
required) 

48 hours 

Those planning to teach must meet state certification require- 
ments (consult advisor). 



108 Oakwood College 

Required COGNATES: 

BA 281 (Introduction to Economics) 4 hours 

SO 361 (Marriage and the Family) 4 hours 

CH 101-102-103 (Survey of Chemistry) 3-3-3 hours 

17 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) „ 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN HOME ECONOMICS 

HOME ECONOMICS MINOR 

HE 111 (Food Preparation) „ 4 hours 

HE 121 (Meal Planning) 4 hours 

HE 151-152 (Clothing Selection and Construction) 4-4 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

(12 hours of upper division Home Economics courses are 
reqiiired) 

28 hours 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FOOD AND NUTRITION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Dietetics) 

HE 111 (Food Preparation) „ 4 hours 

HE 121 (Meal Planning) _..„ 4 hours 

HE 131 (Nutrition) 4 hours 

HE 301 (Experimental Foods) _ 4 hours 

HE 321 (Advanced Nutrition) 4 hours 

HE 421 (Quantity Food Management) 4 hours 

HE 431 (Institutional Management) 4 hours 

Electives „..., 20 hours 

(24 hours of upper division Home Economics courses 
are required.) 



48 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

BA 281 (Introduction to Economics) 4 hours 

BI 111-112 (Human Anatomy and Physiology) 5-5 hours 

BI 221 (Microbiology) — 5 hours 

CH 111-112-113 (General Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

CH 301-302-303 (Organic Chemistry) 4-4-4 hours 

ED 221 (Educational Psychology) 4 hours 

EN 351 (Creative Writing) ...„ 4 hours 

MA 111 (College Algebra) „ 4 hours 



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Departments of Instruction 105 

HI 211. U.S. HISTORY I 4 

A survey of the American scene from approximately 1620 to 1860. 

HI 212. U.S. HISTORY II 4 

A survey of the American scene from 1860 to the present with emphasis 
on the contemporary period. 

HI 314. DENOMINATIONAL HISTORY 4 

A survey course of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church. 

HI 364. AFRO-AMERICAN BACKGROUNDS 4 

The impact of Africa as well as America on the contemporary black in the 
Americas. Prerequisite: Either HI 101 and HI 102 or HI 211 and HI 212. 

HI 401. RESEARCH SEMINAR 4 

The student will be assigned to do a major research paper in either Ameri- 
can, non-American, Black studies or political science areas, and will be 
assigned to that teacher who specializes in that field. 

HI 457. THE AMERICAN FRONTIER 4 

The study of advance across the North American Continent during the era 
1607-1890. Prerequisites: HI 211 and HI 212. 

HI 461. CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 4 

Particular emphasis on the period described in the title. Prerequisite: 
HI 211. 

Non-American Studies 

HI 101. WESTERN CIVILIZATION I 4 

A svirvey course that investigates the great movements of history from the 
downfall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 A.D. up to and including 
the era around 1650. 

HI 102. WESTERN CIVILIZATION II 4 

A survey coiirse that investigates the great movements of history from the 
era of 1650 up until the present time. 

HI 301. ANCIENT HISTORY I 4 

A survey course examining the early empires of antiquity up to and in- 
cluding the Medo-Persian Empire. A required course for religion majors. 

HI 302. ANCIENT HISTORY II 4 

A survey course examining the empires of Greece and Rome, the develop- 
ment of the Papacy and the overthrow of Western Rome. Required of all 
religion majors. 

HI 321. HISTORY OF ENGLAND I 4 

A study of the development of England and the British Empire up to and 
including the period of the Tudors. A cognate for English majors and 
minors. Prerequisite: HI 101, HI 102. 

HI 322. HISTORY OF ENGLAND II 4 

A study of the development of England and the British Empire from the 
Civil War up to and including the twentieth century. A cognate for English 
majors and minors. Prerequisite: HI 101, HI 102. 



106 Oakwood College 

HI 441. HISTORY OF THE CHURCH 4 

A study of the formation and development of the Christian church until the 
thirteenth century with particular emphasis on the first four centuries. 
Prerequisite: HI 101, HI 102. 

HI 442. THE AGE OF REFORMATION 4 

A study of the main events in European History from 1450-1650, with 
emphasis on the religious controversy. Prerequisite: HI 101, HI 102. A re- 
quired subject for all religion majors. 

HI 468. THE AGE OF REVOLUTION 4 

The era and times of revolution in America and Europe from 1770-1870. 
Prerequisites: HI 101 and HI 102. 

MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MINOR 

PS 201 (Comparative Governments) 4 hours 

PS 211 (American Government) 4 hours 

PS 221 (Introduction to Political Science) 4 hours 

PS 441 (International Relations) 4 hours 

PS 450 (American Diplomacy) 4 hours 

PS 451 (Inter- American Relations) 4 hours 

One of the Two (BA 491, SO 301) 4 hours 



28 hours 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PS 201. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTS 4 

An examination of several of the predominant ideologies and governments 
in the world. A contemporary study. 

PS 211. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 4 

A course of study concerning the organization of the United States govern- 
ment in regard to the various branches both on the Federal and state levels. 

PS 221. INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 4 

An examination of the standard essentials of political science in which are 
considered certain contemporary political doctrines, systems of government, 
political organization and behavior, and a look at various world-wide gov- 
ernmental policies. 

PS 441. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 4 

A study of international government and diplomacy. 

PS 450. AMERICAN DIPLOMACY 4 

Past and current American foreign policies with emphasis on historical 
development and processes of formulation. Prerequisites: PS 211, SS 211, 
SS 212. 

PS 451. INTER-AMERICAN RELATIONS 4 

A study of the relations diplomatically and culturally between the United 
States and Latin American covmtries. 



Departments of Instruction 113 

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS 

MATHEMATICS MINOR 

MA 201-202-203 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus) _ 4-4-4 hours 

MA 301 (Linear Algebra) „ 4 hours 

MA 310-311 (Analysis) 4-4 hours 

Electives (Upper Division) 4 hours 



28 hours 
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

MA 100. BASIC MATHEMATICS 2 

A course designed for students whose mathematics scores on the ACT exam 
indicates definite weakness in arithmetical skills. Topics included are 
arithmetical operations, the decimal system and its uses in calculation, 
definition and elementary properties of rational numbers, exponents, first 
degree equations, etc. 

MA 101. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS 4 

Topics include number systems and their bases, sets, relations and their 
properties, further extensions of the number systems, polynomials, relations, 
functions, and their graphs, ratio, proportions, and variation. Other topics 
include basic trigonometry, logarithms, and some topics in statistics. Does 
not apply on major or minor. 

MA 111. COLLEGE ALGEBRA 4 

Exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, permu- 
tations and combinations, complex numbers, etc. Does not apply on major 
or minor. Prerequisite: One year high school algebra. 

MA 112. PLANE TRIGONOMETRY 4 

Trigonometric functions, logarithms, identities, equations, solutions, of 
triangles, inverse trigonometric functions, etc. Does not apply on major or 
minor. Prerequisite: One year high school algebra. 

MA 201-202-203. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS 44-4 

Limits, continuity, differentiation of algebraic functions, definite and in- 
definite integrals, partial and double integration, multiple integration, in- 
finite series and vectors. Prerequisites: MA 111 and MA 112 or equivalent. 

MA 211. SURVEY OF CALCULUS 4 

An introductory study of differential and integral calculus, the theory of 
vector spaces, and linear algebras as applied to chemistry. Does not apply 
on a major or minor. Prerequisites: MA 111 and MA 112 or equivalent. 

MA 251. COLLEGE GEOMETRY 4 

An informal summary of elementary Euclidean geometry, a formal modem 
development of the basic concepts of elementary geometry, non-Euclidean 
geometry, and a selection of topics in advanced Euclidean geometry. 



MA 301. LINEAR ALGEBRA 

Algebra 
linear e( 
MA 203. 



301. LINEAR ALGEBRA 4 

Algebra and geometry of vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices, 
linear equations, quadratic forms, and symmetric matrices. Prerequisite: 
MA 203. 



114 Oakwood College 

MA 307. STATISTICAL METHODS I 4 

An introductory study of statistical procedures. Topics include classification 
of data, measures of central tendency; measures of dispersion, frequency 
distributions, elementary probability, simple regression and correlation, 
design and analysis of experiment. 

MA 308. STATISTICAL METHODS II 4 

A continuation of MA 307 with special attention given to the use of prob- 
ability statistics and other nonparametric statistical tests. Prerequisite: MA 
307. 

MA 310-311. ANALYSIS 4-4 

Extension of MA 203, partial derivates, multiple integrals, differential 
equations with applications. 

MA 321. PROBABILITY & STATISTICS 4 

Descriptive statistics; elementary probability; sampling distributions; infer- 
ence, testing hypotheses, estimation; regression and correlation; applications. 
Prerequisite: MA 203. 

MA 401-402. ADVANCED CALCULUS 4-4 

Limits, continuity, differentiation and integration of fimctions of several 
variables. Convergence and uniform convergence of infinite series and im- 
proper integrals. Differentials and Jacobians, transformations, line and 
surface integrals, vector analysis. Prerequisite: MA 311. 

MA 411-412. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA 4-4 

Algebra of sets, equivalence relations, mappings, order relations; discussion 
of natural, rational, real, and complex number systems; study of the ab- 
stract systems: groups, fields, rings, integral domain. 

MA 419. INTRODUCTION TO REAL ANALYSIS 4 

Elementary set theory, the real number system, sequences, limits of func- 
tions, continuity, differentiation, the Riemann-Stieltjes integral, infinite 
series. Prerequisite: MA 203. 

MA 421. INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3 

An independent study by the student under the guidance of the staff of such 
topics as Green's Theorem, Laplace Transform, Bessel Functions, etc. 



MINOR IN PHYSICS 

PHYSICS MINOR 

PH 111-112-113 (General Physics) _... 4-4-4 hours 

PH 301 (Theoretical Mechanics) 4 hours 

PH 305, 306 (Applied Mathematics in Physics) 4,4 hours 

PH 311 (Electricity and Magnetism) _ 4 hours 



• 



28 hours 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

PH 101.102. THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 4,4 

A survey of astronomy, meteorology, geology, chemistry, and physics for 
the general student. Prerequisite: MA 101. 



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Departments of Instruction 115 

PH 111-112-113. GENERAL PHYSICS 4-4-4 

A siirvey of the field of physics with numerous problems. Prerequisites: 
MA 111, 112. 

PH 301. THEORETICAL MECHANICS 4 

An intermediate course covering the basic principles of vector mechanics 
and the statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Offered when 
required. Prerequisites: One year of college physics and one year of cal- 
culus. 

PH 305, 306. APPLIED MATHEMATICS IN PHYSICS 4,4 

This course is designed to expose the mathematics major to the type of 
things a mathematician employed in industry does, and to give him an 
opportunity to apply his knowledge of mathematics to solve problems in the 
Physical, Biological and Social Sciences. Prerequisite: One year of calculus. 

PH 311. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 4 

In this course the theory of electric and magnetic phenomena is studied. 
The following are some of the topics that will be included. Electrostatic and 
magnetic fields, introduction and use of vector analysis, circuit elements, 
electromagnetic effects of currents, radiation and Maxwell's equations. 
Offered when required. Prerequisites: One year of college physics and one 
year of calculus. 



Department of 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

MODERN LANGUAGES (ML) 



French 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE 

ML 101-102-103. BEGINNING FRENCH 4-4-4 

Study of the fundamentals of grammar with elementary conversation and 
reading of simple material on French culture. Stress on accurate pronun- 
ciation. Laboratory recommended. 

Spanish 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSE 

ML 121-122-123. BEGINNING SPANISH 4-4-4 

A study of the fundamentals of grammar with elementary conversation and 
reading of simple material on Spanish and Hispanic American culture. 
Accurate pronunciation is stressed. Laboratory recommended. 



116 Oakwood College 



Department of Associate Professors: Anthony, Booth (Head) 

%.M»»m*M^^ Assistant Professors: Blackmon, Lacy 

MUSIW Instructor: Ware 

MUSIC (MU) 

The courses in the department of music are designed not only 
to develop an intelligent and appreciative attitude toward music 
but also to guide students who need training to become teachers, 
performers, and musical leaders in Christian service. 

Pre-college musical experience and a natural gift for music 
are prerequisites. All students must audition for the music faculty 
before enrolling as a major or minor. For students who do not meet 
the general requirements of the department, there is a probationary 
period of one year to demonstrate sincerity of purpose, application 
and attitude. After this period, if the student passes a special exam- 
ination, he will be given full status as a music major. 

All sophomore music majors will appear before the music 
faculty at the conclusion of the Spring Quarter for evaluation. All 
music majors and minors will appear before the music faculty at 
the conclusion of each Spring Quarter for a jury examination. 

Participation in a musical organization is required for each 
quarter in residence. Voice majors must be in the college choir. 
They will elect piano unless they are able to pass the Piano Pro- 
ficiency Examination. Organ majors will elect piano, and piano 
majors will elect organ. 

Attendance is required of all majors and minors at all junior 
and senior recitals and lyceum programs. 

All music majors and minors are required to participate in a 
number of public performances. The level and extent of their per- 
formances in recitals and ensembles will be determined by the 
music faculty and the student. 

All majors must present a half hour recital in their junior 
year and an hour recital during their senior year. All minors must 
present a half hour recital. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MUSIC 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Music) (Including minor) 

MU 111-112-113 (Theory I) _ „ -. 9 hours 

MU 114-115-116 (Sight Singing and Ear Training I) 3 hours 

MU 124-125-126 (Italian, German, French Diction 

and Repertoire) 12 hours 

MU 191-192-193 (Applied Music) „ 6 hours 

MU 211-212-213 (Theory II) ^ „ 9 hours 



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MU 214-215-216 (Sight Singing and Ear Training II) 3 hours 

MU 261-262 (Conducting) 6 hours 

MU 291-292-293 (Applied Music) 6 hours 

MU 311-312 (Counterpoint) - 4 hours 

MU 315-316 (Form and Analysis) _-. - 4 hours 

MU 321-322-323 (Music History) 10 hours 

MU 391-392-393 (Applied Music) 6 hours 

MU 457-A (Pedagogy — Piano majors only) 2 hours 

MU 457-B (Pedagogy — Voice majors only) 2 hours 

MU 457-C (Pedagogy — Organ majors only) 2 hours 

MU 491-492-493 (Applied Music) 6 hours 

86 hours 

ALABAMA TEACHER'S CERTIFICATION 

The Music Department recommends that each music major 
and minor fulfill Alabama certification requirements. Otherwise, 
the student should fulfill the certification requirements according 
to the state where he will be teaching. 

MINOR IN MUSIC 

MINOR (Music) (Non-music majors only) 

Immediate performance proficiency is required of all music 
minors. These requirements may be met by examination or nine 
quarter hours of applied music. Other course requirements include: 

MU 111-112-113 (Theory I) 9 hours 

MU 114-115-116 (Sight Singing and Ear Training I) 3 hours 

MU 124 or 125 or 126 (Italian or German or French 

Diction and Repertoire) 4 hours 

MU 261-262 (Conducting) 6 hours 

MU 321-322 (Music History) 8 hours 

Elective (Applied Music) 4 hours 



34 hours 

PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TOWARD THE ALABAMA CLASS B 
ELEMENTARY- SECONDARY PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE 

Professional Education (31^/4 hours) 

ED 101 (Principles of Christian Education) 2 hours 

ED 221 (Educational Psychology) 4 hours 

ED 231 (Principles of Elementary Education) .„ 4 hours 

OR 

ED 241 (Principles of Secondary Education) 4 hours 

ED 311 (Human Development) 4 hours 

MU 343 (Methods and Materials of Teaching Music in 

the Elementary School) 4 hours 



118 



Oakwood College 



ED 411 (Internship in Elementary Schcx)l Teaching) . 
OR 

ED 421 (Internship in Secondary School Teaching) 

MU 443 (Methods and Materials of Teaching Music in 

the Secondary School) .- , 

MU 457 (Pedagogy) 



Himianities 

Required: EN 101-103, CO 201, IN 201. 
Mathematics „ 

Required: MA 101 
Psychology 

Required: PY 101 
Science .» 

Required: BI 101, 102, PH 101, 102, HE 131 
Social Science 

Required: HI 101-102, SO 101, MU 321-323. 



REMAINDER OF CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 



9 hours 


9 hours 


4 hours 


2 hours 


33 hours 


21 hours 


4 hours 


4 hours 


20 hours 


22 hours 



104 hours 



Health ._ _ 2 hours 

Required: PE 211 
Physical Education ._ 3 hours 

PE 101, 102, Elective 1 hour. 
Religion 16-22 hours 

Required: RE 111, RE 201 or 202, RE 311 or 312, RE 331 

(Bible Survey — 6 hours required of students submitting 
less than 2 units of High School Bible.) 



21-27 hours 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

MUSIC APPRECIATION 

MU 201. MUSIC APPRECIATION 4 

Fimdamentals of music expression, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, form 
and meter are included in this course. The student is introduced to musical 
works which portray essential factors basic to musical understanding. Repre- 
sentative music literature is presented from several periods and composers. 
Classroom activities are coordinated with out-of-class assignments, such as 
television programs, lyceum attractions and community concerts. 

MUSICAL STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION 



MU 91. FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC 2 

A basic course intended to lay a foundation in the following: notation, 
rhythm, scales, key signatures, chords, terms and forms. This course is 



Departments of Instruction 119 

designed to strengthen the weakness of prospective music majors or minors 
who have had limited musical exjK^rience other than their performance 
medium. No credit toward a music major or minor. Prerequisite: Recom- 
mendation by music department faculty. 

MU 92. KEYBOARD HARMONY 2 

Designed to provide intensive training in the fundamental skills of musi- 
cianship at the keyboard, with emphasis on the rhythmic, melwlic, and 
harmonic concepts. No credit toward a music major or minor. Prerequisite: 
MU 91 or recommendation by the music faculty. 

MU 111-112-113. THEORY 1 3-33 

The measurements and organization of intervals, chords, scales, modes and 
modulation and their application in the structure of outstanding music 
literature. Keyboard harmony and creative writing are correlated activities. 
Prerequisite: MU 91 and MU 92 or equivalent. 

MU 114-115-116. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING I ll-l 

Sight singing of basic diatonic music, non-modulating, programmed instruc- 
tion in rhythmic, intervallic, melodic and harmonic dictation, 

MU 211-212-213. THEORY II 3-3-3 

A continuation of MU 111-112-113 with emphasis on the measurements and 
the organization of chromatic chords and their application in the structure 
of outstanding music literature, keyboard harmony and creative writing are 
correlated activities. Prerequisite: MU 111-112-113 or equivalent. 

MU 214-215-216. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING II l-l-t 

Sight Singing in diatonic and chromatic music including modulation, further 
practice in rhythmic, intervallic, melodic and harmonic dictation. Pre- 
requisite: MU 114-115-116 or equivalent. 

MU 311. COUNTERPOINT (16TH CENTURY) 2 

16th century counterpoint introduces the student to the whole concept of 
basic contrapuntal practices and principles. The emphasis is on simple 
counterpoint and the five species in two and three voices. Prerequisite: 
MU 211-212-213. 

MU 312. COUNTERPOINT (18TH CENTURY) 2 

This course introduces 18th century contrapuntal practices. Canons, inven- 
tions, and the fugue are studied and the techniques and devices used in such 
writing are analyzed aurally and visually. Labs will accompany this course. 
Prerequisite: MU 211-212-213. 

MU 315-316. FORM AND ANALYSIS 2-2 

A study of structure of music from the small forms to the larger song forms, 
rondo forms, and sonata-allegro forms. Prerequisite: MU 211-212-213. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

MU 124-125-126. ITALIAN, GERMAN, FRENCH DICTION 

AND REPERTOIRE 4 4-4 

The study of correct pronunciation of Italian, German and French, enabling 
singers to perform the extensive literature available in these languages. 
The introduction to song literature with intensive study of styles of Italian, 
German and French languages. 



120 Oakwood College 

MU 343. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING MUSIC 

IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 4 

The organization and presentation of the following phases of music will be 
studied: rote singing, note singing, part singing, song repertoire, child voice, 
rhythm band, notation, music history and appreciation, 

MU 364. PASTORAL MUSICIANSHIP 4 

A survey of general musicianship and the study of problems related to the 
organization and cooperative implementation of musical activities in the 
church. Open to prospective pastors and other interested students. Not 
credited toward a music major or minor. 

MU 443. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING MUSIC 

IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 4 

The place of music as a legitimate subject in junior and senior high schools 
is given careful attention in this course. Stress is placed on the structure and 
operation of good general music classes, the organization, and functioning 
of choral and instrumental groups, and the conducting of special interest 
classes at the senior high level. 

MU 457. PEDAGOGY 2 

A study of the teaching strategies and techniques currently used by master 
teachers of performance. Vocal and instrumental teachers will design the 
musical experiences in their specific areas. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

MU 101-A-102-A-103-A. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN PIANO M-l 

A coiurse in piano playing for the beginning student using group (small 
groups, from two to five) and individual techniques. Credit does not apply 
on music major or minor. 

MU 101-B-102>B-103-B. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN VOICE LM 

An elementary course in singing employing group and individual tech- 
niques. Credit does not apply on music major or minor. 

MU 104-A-105-A-106-A. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN PIANO I or 2 

Private piano instruction. Credit does not apply on music major or minor. 

MU 104-8- 105-B-106-B. CLASS INSTRUCTION IN VOICE I or 2 

Private vocal instruction. Credit does not apply on music major or minor. 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION 

All Juniors and Seniors in piano or organ will be required to 
do a certain number of hours accompanying for the various en- 
sembles. A grade for this work will be averaged with work done in 
private study. 

MU 191-A-192-A-193-A. PIANO (Freshman standing by exams) I or 2 

MU 191-B-192-B-193-B. VOICE (Freshman standing by exams) I or 2 

MU 191-C-192-C-193-C. ORGAN (Freshman standing by exams) 1 or 2 

MU 291-A-292-A-293.A. PIANO I or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 191-A - 192-A - 193-A. 



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Departments of Instruction 121 

MU 291-B-292-B.293-B. VOICE I or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 191-B - 192-B - 193-B. 

MU 291-C-292.C-293.C. ORGAN I or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 191-C - 192-C - 193-C. 

MU 261. CONDUCTING 3 

A study of the basic conducting patterns, expressive and interpretative 
vocabulary, duple, triple and irregular beat patterns expressive terminology 
and general problems related to congregational and choral directing. 

MU 262. CONDUCTING 3 

This course deals with the finer details of outstanding choral literature, 
including major choral works such as oratorios and masses. Prerequisite: 
MU 261. 

MU 391.A-392.A-393-A. PIANO I or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 291-A - 292-A - 293-A. 

MU 391-B -392.8 -393-8. VOICE I or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 291 -B - 292-B - 293-B. 

MU 391-C-392-C-393-C. ORGAN ! or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 291-C- 292-C - 293-C. 

MU 491-A-492-A-493-A. PIANO I or 2 

Prerequisite: Mu 391-A - 392-A - 393-A. 

MU 491-8-492-8-493-8. VOICE I or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 391-B - 392-B - 393-B. 

MU 491 -0.492-0-493-0. ORGAN I or 2 

Prerequisite: MU 391-C - 392-C - 393-C. 



MUSIC HISTORY 

MU 301. THE HISTORY OF AFRO^AMERICAN MUSIC AND ART 4 

A study of the historical and stylistic development of black music from 
ancient Africa to the present. An assessment of black musicians who have 
shaped the musical climate of America. Also to study the art of black people 
in the Americas as well as in Africa. This course will serve as a medium 
towards the comprehension of the mixture of the African and American 
elements and a better understanding of the role of black people in world 
cultural development. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of Afro- 
American art and architecture in the Western Hemisphere. Prerequisite: 
MU 201. 

MU 321-322. MUSIC HISTORY 4-4 

A study of music literature from antiquity to the present, cultural back- 
ground, development of musical forms and styles and analysis of representa- 
tive masterworks from each major period of music history. Listening periods 
are required in addition to the class period. 

MU 323. CONTEMPORARY MUSIC 2 

A study of representative schools and composers of contemporary music, and 
application through original compositions, of their techniques. 



122 Oakwood College 

VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLES 

Although there is no charge for participation in music or- 
ganizations (other than tuition when taken for credit), students 
must register for entrance into the organization. All students 
pursuing a music major must participate in a music organization 
each year of residence. 

Non-music majors may accumulate not more than three hours 
credit in music organization unless this credit is balanced by an 
equal number of hours in music theory or history. Admission to 
any musical organization is by audition. Regular attendance is 
required at all rehearsals even though the student may not be 
participating for credit. 

Ensembles on campus are organized and sponsored by mem- 
bers of the staff. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

MU 271 ■272-273. COLLEGE CHOIR \-\-\ 

Designed for those whose major interest is in voice, membership is by in- 
vitation only with selection based upon character, talent, and musicianship 
with preference shown those studying in the vocal department. Repertoire 
includes all types and periods of music both sacred and secular. Concert 
appearances, church services appointments, and field tours are regularly 
scheduled. 

MU 274-275-276. AEOLIANS Ml 

The Aeolians is a highly selective ensemble, balanced for four- and eight- 
part singing. Representative works of the great masters of choral composition 
are studied, memorized and performed. In addition to public programs, the 
choir goes on tour giving programs in larger churches and schools. Member- 
ship in this ensemble depends upon strict compliance with the rules and 
standards of the organization. 



Department of Assistant Professor: Roache (Head) 

Instructors: Dormer, Gibb, Johnson 

NURSING 

NURSING (NU) 



An associate in science degree nursing curriculum is offered 
to selected men and women students. 

The curriculum, approved by the Alabama Board of Nursing, 
is composed of general education courses and nursing courses. The 
program may be completed in two years. Upon completion of the 
program, the student will be awarded an Associate in Science de- 



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Departments of Instruction 123 

gree and will be eligible to write the state board test pool examina- 
tions for licensure as a registered nurse. Graduates will be prepared 
to serve in staff nurse positions and provide care that is common, 
recurring and immediate in a variety of settings. 

One class is admitted to the nursing program each year in the 
Fall quarter. Students wishing to take part of their general educa- 
tion courses before taking their nursing courses may do so. The 
general education courses are the regularly constituted courses of 
the college, and are taken with other college students. 

In addition to regular college entrance requirements, prospec- 
tive nursing students must: 

1 . Have credit for all the prerequisite secondary courses listed 
on page 68. 

2. Have an overall GPA above 2.5. 

3. Send to admission office standard scores for ACT or SAT 
tests. 

4. Have a physical examination at the beginning of each 
school year and offer evidence of good physical and mental 
health. 

Students will be notified of acceptance into the Nursing Pro- 
gram. 

Students seeking admission by transfer will be considered ac- 
cording to Oakwood College's policy on the admission of transfer 
students. All students must be in residence for two quarters of the 
program. 

Nursing students must maintain the following standards if 
they are to remain in the program: 

1. Maintain an overall GPA of 2.00. 

2. Attain a grade of "C" in each science and nursing course 
taken. 

The nursing course grade is determined by theoretical and 
clinical laboratory performance. Students must demonstrate safe 
clinical laboratory performance as defined by written criteria 
available in Nursing Department office. 

Failure in either theoretical or clinical performance will re- 
sult in failure for the course and will require repetition of the 
course. 

WTienever a student does not maintain an overall GPA of 2.00 
in the program, he will be dropped from the nursing courses until 
he has demonstrated the ability to maintain a 2.00 average in his 
general education courses. The nursing faculty may then approve 
re-entry into the program. 

Through a planned system of advisement, a program is 






124 



Oakwood College 



planned to meet individual needs of students. Faculty advisors will 
counsel students on transferable credits and requirements for aca- 
demic mobility. 

The student who plans to progress to a baccalaureate degree 
program in nursing should consult the bulletin of the school of his 
choice. 

A year of college chemistry is usually required. 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN NURSING 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

NU 101-102-103 (Nursing I, II, III) 4-4-4 hours 

NU 201-202-203 (Nursing IV, V, VI) 12-12-12 hours 

NU 221 (Seminar in Nursing) 2 hours 

50 hours 

BI 111-112 (Anatomy & Physiology) 5-5 hours 

BI 221 (Microbiology) 5 hours 

ED 101 (Principles of Christian Education) 2 hours 

ED 271 (Survey of Human Development) 4 hours 

EN 101-102 (English Composition) 4-4 hours 

PY 101 (Principles of Psychology) 4 hours 

HE 131 (Nutrition) 4 hours 

Religion elective ^ 4 hours 

Behavioral Science electives 8 hours 

Physical Education ^ 1 hour 

50 hours 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

NU 101-102-103. NURSING I, II, III 4-4-4 

The introductory and succeeding courses are based on principles from nat- 
ural and behavioral science theory and related clinical application. The 
content of each quarter moves from the simple to the complex. The skills 
required for the prevention and cure of disease and rehabilitation of patient 
are taught, utilizing both college and clinical laboratory facilities. Co-req- 
uisites: BI 111, 112, 221; HE 131; ED 271. 

NU 201 -202-203. NURSING IV. Y. Yl 1 2- 1 2- 1 2 

The content of each quarter builds on that of the previous quarter by pro- 
viding learning experiences which foster knowledge of the more complex 
nursing problems. The physiological and psychological nursing components 
of mother and child, medical, surgical and psychiatric conditions emphasize 
the preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative asi)ects of the evolving role 
of the nurse in society. Prerequisites: NU 101, 102, 103. 

NU 221. SEMINAR IN NURSING 2 

Focuses on the transition from student to registered nurse. Studies the con- 
cepts of nursing and the social, political and scientific movements that in- 
fluence nursing practices. Explores the social, ethical and professional issues 
and the resi)onsibility of the re^stered nurse as an individual practitioner, 
a member of the nursing profession and a member of the conunimity. 



Departments of Instruction 125 



Department of Professors: Richards, Rogers, Warren (Head) 

REII^I^N^I A ^11% Assistant Professor: Taylor 

KCLI^IUN AND instructors: Butler, Lavender 

THEOLOGY 

RELIGION (RE) AND BIBLICAL LANGUAGES (BL) 



The sub-areas of this division are three, namely: (1) RELI- 
GION, (2) THEOLOGY, and (3) BIBLICAL LANGUAGES. 

The RELIGION major follows a tailored course of study to 
prepare for Bible Instructing, Classroom Teaching (Elementary, 
Secondary, and Higher Education levels). Literature Ministry, 
Medical Ministry, Foreign Missions, and Laymen Leadership. 
Specific subjects other than those listed below are dictated by em- 
phasis mentioned above. THEOLOGY is for the major who looks 
to the Pastoral, Evangelistic, Conference Leadership ministries, and 
further ministerial training at the S.D.A. Theological Seminary of 
Andrews University. BIBLICAL LANGUAGES offers a minor 
including Greek and Hebrew. 

Because of the large supply of students preparing for the 
pastoral/evangelistic ministry and the variety of new areas within 
the church for religious service, IT IS STRONGLY RECOM- 
MENDED THAT EVERY STUDENT IN THEOLOGY HAVE 
A DOUBLE MAJOR without a minor. For details, counsel with 
your advisor in Theology. 

The entire mosaic of courses in this division is designed to 
develop within the student a deep appreciation for the importance 
of the Bible in determining the true philosophy of life, to encourage 
the application of the teachings of Jesus Christ to the problems of 
our day, and to provide training for students who desire to serve the 
church and humanity. 

A Two -Year Bible Instructor course for which the student 
receives a certificate is described in the present Bulletin on page 127. 

Beyond the major's 45 hours in his chosen field and another 
49 hours in required cognates and electives (totaling 97 quarter 
hours), he has a remaining 95 hours with which to complete his 
(1) Basic Requirements, and (2) minor, thus bringing him to 
the minimum 192 quarter hours for graduation with a Bachelor of 
Arts degree. 

No grade below "C" may apply toward a major or minor. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGION 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Religion) 

RE 111 (Life and Teachings of Jesus) — 4 hours 






126 



Oakwood College 



RE 301-302 (Old Testament Prophets) 3-3 hours 

RE 311 (Prophetic Interpretation - Daniel) 4 hours 

RE 312 (Prophetic Interpretation - Revelation) 4 hours 

RE 321 (Homiletics) 3 hours 

RE 323 (The Work of the Bible Instructor) 4 hours 

RE 331 (The Gift of Prophecy) 4 hours 

RE 425 (Christian Literature Salesmanship) 2 hoiu*s 

RE 441 (Bible Manuscripts) 2 hours 

RE 451 (Contemporary Theology) 4 hours 

Electives (Any two of the three: RE 201, RE 202, RE 412) 8 hours 

45 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

Modem Languages „ 12 hours 

SP 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 4 hours 

ED 301 (Methods in Teaching Bible in the Elementary School) 2 hours 
HI 314 (SDA Denominational History) 4 hours 

22 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 



! 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN THEOLOGY 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

MAJOR (Theology) 

RE HI (Life and Teachings of Jesus) 4 hours 

RE 301-302 (Old Testament Prophets) 3-3 hours 

RE 311 (Prophetic Interpretation - Daniel) 4 hours 

RE 312 (Prophetic Interpretation - Revelation) 4 hours 

RE 321-322 (Homiletics and Preaching) 3-3 hours 

RE 331 (The Gift of Prophecy) 4 hours 

RE 423 (Pastoral Ministry) 2 hours 

RE 424 (Public Evangelism) 2 hours 

RE 426 (Pastoral Stewardship) 2 hours 

RE 441 (Bible Manuscripts) 2 hours 

RE 451 (Contemporary Theology) ._ 4 hours 

Electives (Any one of the three: RE 201, RE 202, RE 412) 4 hours 

44 hours 
Required COGNATES: 

BL 201-202-203 (Beginning New Testament Greek) 4-4-4 hours 

BL 301-302 (Intermediate New Testament Greek) 4-4 hours 

HI 301 or 302 (Ancient History) _ 4 hours 

HI 314 (SDA Denominational History) _ 4 hours 

HI 441 (History of the Christian Church) - „ 4 hours 



Departments of Instruction 



127 



MU 364 (Pastoral Musicianship) . 
CO 201 (Fundamentals of Speech) 



4 hours 
4 hours 



40 hours 
MINOR (Field to be chosen) 28-32 hours 

MINOR IN BIBLICAL LANGUAGES 

GREEK AND HEBREW 

BL 201 thru 302 (Greek) 20 hours 

BL 411,412 (Hebrew) 8 hours 



MINOR IN RELIGION/THEOLOGY 

RELIGION/THEOLOGY MINOR 

RE 111 (Life and Teachings of Jesus) 

(Prophetic Interpretation - Daniel) _ 

(Prophetic Interpretation - Revelation) ...„ 

(The Work of the Bible Instructor) 

(The Gift of Prophecy) 

(Contemporary Theology) 



RE 311 
RE 312 
RE 323 
RE 331 
RE 451 
Electives (Either one of the two: RE 201, RE 202) 



28 hours 


4 hours 


4 hours 


4 hours 


4 hours 


4 hours 


4 hours 


4 hours 



28 hours 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS IN BIBLE INSTRUCTORSHIP 

For the student who is not available for the "Four- Year" Bible 
Instructor course and who desires minimal preparation in Bible 
Instructorship, without attaining the B.A. degree in Religion and 
Theology, a two-year curriculum is available for introducing such 
a person to practical instruction in the fundamental beliefs of 
Seventh-day Adventists and in public and personal soul-winning 
endeavor. A certificate is granted only to high school graduates 
upon the completion of this two-year course. 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS 



Course No. Hours 

SC 111-112 (Elem. Typing) 4 

RE 111 (Lf. & Teh. of Jesus) .... 4 

PY 101 (Prin. of Psych.) 4 

EN 101-102-103 (Eng. Comp.) .. 12 

RE 201 (Christian Fund.) 4 

HI 101, 102 (Western Civil.) .. 8 

(Race Relations) 4 

(Fund, of Speech) 4 

(Health Prin.) 2 

(Theory of Homiletics) 4 



Course No. 



Hours 



SO 241 
CO 201 
PE 211 
RE 321 



RE 323 (The Work of the 

Rible Instructor) 4 

RE 311, 312 (Dan. & Rev.) 8 

RE 331 (Gift of Prophecy) 4 

RE 423 (Pastoral Ministry) .... 2 

RE 424 (Public Evangelism) .. 2 

RE 426 (Pastoral Stewardship) 2 

RL 201-202-203 (Greek) 12 

SO 101 (Intro, to Sociology) .... 4 

SC 231 (Office Machines) 3 

ED 101 (Prin. of Christian Ed.) 2 

Electives 3 

TOTAL QUARTER HOURS 96 



128 Oakwood College 

BIBLE 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

RE 101. SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH BIBLE 3 

This course is designed for freshmen whose secondary training included 
little or no study of the Bible. Its purpose is to acquaint the student with 
the unfolding of the great plan of God for mankind as revealed in the 
history of Israel, and of first century Christianity. Necessarily the course 
develops into a rapid survey of both Testaments, preparing the student for 
a more intensive study of the Scriptures. Messianic promises and ancestry 
are emphasized. 

RE 102. SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH BIBLE 3 

A continuation of RE 101, which is a prerequisite for this course. 

RE 111. LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS 4 

A review of the life of the Master Teacher and a study of the principles 
and parabolic representations of Christian life and faith as revealed in the 
Gospels. Prerequisite: Two units of High School Bible or RE 101-102. 

RE 201. FUNDAMENTALS OF THE CHRISTIAN FAITH 4 

An intensive study of the fundamentals of Christian doctrines as believed 
and taught by Seventh-day Adventists. Prerequisite: RE 101-102 or high 
school Bible Doctrines. 

RE 202. FUNDAMENTALS OF THE CHRISTIAN FAITH 4 

A continuation of RE 201, which is a prerequisite for this course. 

RE 211. BLACK LITURGY — AN HISTORICAL ANALYSIS 4 

An examination of the specific role of the Black Seventh-day Adventist 
Church in the community, also entailing a psychological analysis and 
description of black worship. An understanding of the various types of 
worship, both personal and corporate in the black community. 

RE 301-302. OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS 3-3 

A study of the major and minor prophets in their chronological sequence, 
tracing the hand of God in the history of Israel and Judah and the promises 
of redemption to all nations through the Messiah. Attention is given to the 
historicity of these books along with their literary and spiritual values. 

RE 311. (PROPHETIC INTERPRETATION) DANIEL 4 

A study of the Book of Daniel in which historical backgroimd and its 
pertinence to the times are stressed. 

RE 312. (PROPHETIC INTERPRETATION) REVELATION 4 

A study of this book of prophecy with special attention given to the por- 
trayal of the controversy between the true and the apostate church forces. 

RE 331. THE GIFT OF PROPHECY 4 

A course of study tracing prophetic ministry from creation to the re-crea- 
tion. Primary aims for this study are to establish in the student's mind 
the place and purpose of the gift in the remnant church, and to reveal its 
influence upon tie work and progress of that church. 

RE 412. ACTS AND EPISTLES 4 

A historical and exegetical study and survey of the book of Acts and the 
Epistles of Paul, tracing the origin of the Christian church, the spread of 



I 



[ 



Departments of Instruction 129 

the Gospel from Jerusalem to Rome, the historical setting and purpose for 
the Pauline letters, and their relationships to the doctrinal developments 
and usages in the Christian Qiurch. 

RE 441. BIBLE MANUSCRIPTS 2 

A study of the history of the English Bible, the methods of its transmission 
to men and its preservation through the years, problems of translations, 
versions, manuscripts, textual criticism, etc. 

RE 451. CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY 4 

This course is introductory to the fields noted in its title and focuses both 
on the practical aspects of Christian faith, its ethical grounds and goals and 
also on such theological elements as Liberalism, Conservatism, Dialectical 
Theology, and Neo-Orthodoxy. 

RE 452. RESEARCH 3 

This course, limited to upperclassmen, consists of a research project in an 
area of theological interest approved by the Chairman of the Department. 



APPLIED THEOLOGY 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

RE 321-322. HOMILETICS AND PREACHING 3-3 

A study of the preparation and delivery of sermons and gospel addresses. 
The course stresses the mechanics of sermon construction and analysis, and 
provides adequate exercises to ensure some proficiency in both the con- 
struction and delivery of gospel messages. Meets four (4) days weekly 
each quarter for three (3) hours credit. Prerequisites: RE 111, 201 or 202, 
311 or 312. 

RE 323. THE WORK OF THE BIBLE INSTRUCTOR 4 

A course designed to explore the principles and techniques of Bible teaching 
and personal evangelism. 

RE 423. PASTORAL MINISTRY 2 

This course surveys the work of the pastor and his soul-winning activities, 
counseling, church services, administrative responsibilities, community 
interests and preaching. 

RE 424. PUBLIC EVANGELISM 2 

A study of the duties of the evangelist and his associates in the conducting 
of evangelistic campaigns. (If the student makes proper arrangements in 
advance with the Chairman of the Religion and Theology Division, he may 
fulfill requirements of this course through FIELD WORK.) 

RE 425. CHRISTIAN LITERATURE SALESMANSHIP 2 

An introduction to the theory and practice of literature ministry, its goals, 
its processes, its mission, its rewards. Elective only. 

RE 426. PASTORAL STEWARDSHIP 2 

This course is designed to survey the principles of Christian stewardship 
and the application of these principles in church organization and adminis- 
tration. 



130 



Oakwood College 



BIBLICAL LANGUAGES 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BL 201-202-203. BEGINNING NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 4-4-4 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamentals of 
Greek grammar and sentence structure as found in the Greek New Testa- 
ment. Vocabulary drills, simple translation, and reading exercises are 
provided in each lesson. 

BL 301-302. INTERMEDIATE NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 4-4 

This course is a comprehensive review of Greek grammar, with translation 
of selected readings in the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: BL 201-202. 

BL 411.412. BEGINNING CLASSICAL HEBREW 4-4 

A survey of the most prevalent language found in the Old Testament with 
emphasis on syntax, sentence structure, vocabulary, reading and translation. 
The objective is not only to better equip the student for graduate work in 
Biblical study but also to provide him with a useful tool toward an accurate 
interpretation and understanding of the Bible during his college career and 
during his personal study. Because Hebrew is not required in the theologi- 
cal curriculum, it is offered only upon special request to the Religion 
Department. 



Financial Information 131 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Oakwood College is incorporated under the laws of the state 
of Alabama as a nonprofit institution. 

The General Conference has provided substantial investment 
in buildings, equipment, auxiliaries and operational appropriations 
to meet the needs of quality education. 

Therefore, the amount which the student pays for his basic 
educational expenses is modest when compared to that of other 
private liberal arts colleges. 

Economic conditions may make it necessary for the College 
Board of Trustees, or duly authorized administrative officers, or 
Finance Committee, to make changes in the published bulletin. 

AppHcation Procedures: See Admissions section of the 
Bulletin. 

BOARD ACTIONS 

Actions voted by the College Board, Faculty, or Finance 
Committee at any time shall have equal force or, if necessary, 
supersede statements published in this Bulletin. 

CHARGES PER QUARTER* 

13-16 hours 9-12 hours 
Tuition $630 $530 

Room z.:... ...::::... 160-- 16O ^ 

Food Service ;......... 175^-^^^^*^ 175 

General Fee -.::.-:rr-"^. 29 29 

Total Charges Per Quarter ,'. $994} \^^) 

*See schedule or rates for room and board for meir~Siia women, page 133. 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

The College offers three plans for payment of Registration 



Fees. 



Plan I Pay in Full tuition, room, board, and general fee on 
day of registration. 

Plan II Two Payment Plan — Pay a deposit of $770 (for 
13-16 hours) or $670 (for 9-12 hours) and the Col- 
lege will send bill to student and guardian for the 
balance due by the tenth of the following month. 
—Th€r5~wiiW?e™0-'twO'-'pei!»e«nt' surface charge for aii 
•overdue^seeounts . 

Plan III Monthly Payment Plan — For details concerning 
this plan, please make direct contact with Tuition 
Plan, Inc. (See page 138). Send copy of contract to 
Student Finance Officer before Registration. 



132 Oakwood College 

, Community Students pay t,uition and general fee on day of 
registration. . 

1. Students should arrange financing for the entire school 
year, from September through May, and fulfill the finan- 
cial requirements on schedule. 

Registration Dates 
Fall Quarter <' ^ September .7-9, 1975 

Winter Quarter January. 4-5, 1976 
Spring Quarter . March 15-16, 1976 
Summer Quarter June 7, 1976 

2. Permission to register for classes will be given when ac- 
count is paid in full and the necessary funds have been 
deposited for current quarter. 

3. Seniors are requifed to have accounts paid in full one week 
before graduation. 

4. Degrees and transcripts will be issued when accounts are 
paid in full and any loan account is currently paid. 

OVERSEAS STUDENTS 

Applicants from overseas are required to deposit the follovdng 
U.S. Funds with the college business office prior to the issuance of 
the 1-20 Form for use in securing the U.S. student visa: 

Single Students $1,000 

Married Couples $1,200 

Students on resident visas, student visas, or visitor visas, will 
be required to present budget to verify financial support for pay- 
ment of account, before official acceptance is issued by the Admis- 
sions office. This budget should show, total cost of academic as well 
as living expenses, and how these expenses will be paid. Also this 
statement should be notarized as being a true and accurate state- 
ment by the student and his sponsor. (Refer to Admissions booklet) . 

CASH WITHDRAWALS 

Request for cash withdrawals from account will be granted on 
the following conditions: 

1 . Students may withdraw cash from account if the cash credit 
balance is in excess of charges for the quarter and receive 
approval of Student Finance office. 

2. Students withdrawing from classes and who are recipients 
of Federally Insured Loans or National Direct Loans or 
State Insured Loans; the lending agency must be notified 
before a cash refund will be made. 



Financial Information 133 

3. When payment is made by personal check, allow four to 
six weeks before a cash withdrawal can be made. 

4. No cash withdrawals will be given on college sponsored 
discounts or student labor credit. 

STUDENT BANK 

The Business Office offers a deposit banking service for the 
convenience of students. Financial sponsors should provide the 
students with a regular monthly allowance so that personal items 
may be purchased by the student. 

REMIHANCE 

PAYMENT OF REGISTRATION FEES SHOULD BE 
MADE IN THE FORM OF: BANK DRAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, 
CASHIER'S CHECKS, CERTIFIED PERSONAL CHECKS OR 
CASH. MAKE ALL CHECKS PAYABLE TO OAKWOOD COL- 
LEGE. 

Send payments directly to Business Office and indicate the 
name of students to receive credit. A check handling fee of $5.00 
will be charged for checks returned by Bank for insufficient funds, 
and the guardian will be notified to send a Cashier's Check, Money 
Order, or Bank Draft for payment of registration fees, within seven 
days after notice. 

TUITION RATES PER QUARTER 

13-16 hours $630.00 

9-12 hours 530.00 - 

1- 8 hours 50.00 (per hour) 

For each hour above 16 add 37.00 

HOUSING 

Residence Halls — Single students not living with parents or 
relatives are required to live in one of the College Residence Halls. 
The room charge is based on two students per room. A student 
may, upon application to the residence dean, be granted the priv- 
ilege of rooming alone when sufficient rooms are available; forty- 
five dollars per quarter will be added to regular charge for one 
student per room. When two students occupy a room the rates are 
as follows: ,. 

ROOM RATES PER QUARTER ^ 

Carter Hall (Women) $160 -^^^"pJ^ 

Cunningham Hall (Men) 150 " ) I ^ 

Peterson Hall (Women) 150 -— y / ^ 

Edwards Halls (Men) 160 . ^Jt> 



The above rates include unfinished laundry. 



I 



134 Oakwood College 

MARRIED STUDENTS HOUSING 

The College has a limited number of one and two bedroom 
apartments for married students. A stove and refrigerator are pro- 
vided but the student is expected to provide his furnishings and 
pay the monthly utility bills. The charges per month are: 

One-Bedroom Apartment $50.00 

Two-Bedroom Apartment 60.00 

Write the Business Manager for reservations on campus or 
information for community housing. 

HOUSING DEPOSITS 

Before registration, all students living in the College residence 
halls are required to pay a room deposit of $30.00. Married students 
residing in College apartment units are required to pay a deposit 
of $50.00. 

If this is not paid before the day of registration, the deposit 
will be added to the entrance fee. This deposit is held in trust until 
the student vacates his room or apartment, leaves it in good condi- 
tion and turns the keys in. Upon receipt of a satisfactory inspection 
report, the Business Office will issue a check for the deposit to the 
student within three weeks after the close of school. Should the 
room or apartment be left untidy or damaged, the deposit will be 
forfeited. 

In addition, the housing deposit will be regarded as security 
against damage to institutional property throughout the course of 
the school year. The cost of any arrangements necessary to correct 
the misuse or abuse of College property and equipment on the part 
of a student will be charged to that student and the amount will be 
deducted from the housing deposit. Excessive abuse, the correction 
of which requires the use of the entire deposit before the end of the 
school year will necessitate a new cash deposit before the student 
will be permitted to register the following quarter. In cases where 
the abuse is judged to be a chronic characteristic of the student, he 
may be asked to give up his quarters and withdraw from the 
residence hall. This of course will jeopardize the student's continued 
matriculation at the College. 

"^ -^^^^ / FOOD SERVICE 

All residence^Tliall students are expected to take their meals 
in the Food Service Center, since no provision is made for food 
preparation in individual rooms. The cafeteria plan of board- 
ing is used which allows a student to select his food. A mini- 
mum board of $175 for men and $140 for women per quarter is 
charged for this service. Should a student eat more than the 
minimum, the excess is charged on the statement. Non-resident 
students who use the cafeteria service are required to pay cash for 
their meals. 



Financial Information 135 

MUSIC CHARGES 

Students who register for music lessons are expected to con- 
tinue taking lessons throughout the quarter. No refund is made 
if lessons are dropped after the second lesson of any quarter for 
reasons other than prolonged illness or withdrawal from school. 
Students who drop within the first week will be charged the 
single lesson rate of $6.00 per lesson. Students are entitled to 
take, but may not receive a grade for less than a minimum of nine 
lessons. Lessons lost because of the student's irregularity in at- 
tendance may not be made up. 

Students who major or minor in music will be charged the 
regular tuition rates. Students taking music without credit should 
pay the following: 

9 - half hour lessons $50.00 per quarter. 
Band fee per quarter — $10.00 

GENERAL FEE— $29.00 PER QUARTER (NO REFUND) 

l-3«?«5^™The General Fee charged per quarter is allocated as follows: 

United Student Movement - $10.00 

Lyceum rr"!^:. ...,...: 2.00 

College Center ■■^^- --- ^-^^ 

M.VN4.ctivities ..--., ^^^r!^ .50 

Health Service ..^^f:^.. |. 5.00 

Sick and Accidents-^ ..^/f^.. 4.00 

JLDrCards r^"::^J^<^ .50 

Swimming .^^... r!!t^*,,_^ >, 3.50 

General ge^for wives of enrolled studelits,.— $10.00: 

Lyceimv.^ $2.00 Sick&Accident Insurance $4.00 

JJeaia Service 3.50 I.D. Cards .50 

INCIDENTAL FEES (NO REFUND) 

Application Fee (Send Money Order) $ 5.00 

Application Fee After July 31 10.00 

Auto Registration 5.00 

Band 10.00 

Change of Program 5.00 

Diploma 5.00 

Entrance Exams 5.00 

Examination for Waiver 25.00 

Examination for Credit ($10.00 per hour) 



136 Oakwood College 
Graduation ^^^ - -10.00 ^ " 



Graduation in Absentia 20.00 

Laboratory (Breakage, up to) 10.00 

Late Registration 10.00 

Nursing Laboratory 25.00 

Nursing Uniform (Women) 60.00 

Nursing Uniform (Men) 45.00 

Nursing Transportation 75.00 

Physical Education 5:60 -^ 

Removal of Incompletes (each) 2.00 

Room Deposits - Residence Halls 30.00 

Room Deposits - Apartments 50.00 

Health Service Transportation (per trip) 3.00 

Return Check Handling Fee (per check) 2.00 

Student Teacher Transportation 50.00 

Transcript of Credits 1.00 

FAMILY DISCOUNTS 

A discount of 10% of tuition only will be allowed to families 
supporting more than one member of the family enrolled at this 
College. This discount does not apply to workers deceiving the 
educational allowances or to students working more than 50 per- 
cent of the tuition. 

REFUNDS ' %^'^;:>;xt/r"''' 

Refunds of tuition will be made only to those who receive drop 
vouchers. The effective date of refund will be the date on which 
the completed vouchers are returned to the Registrar's Office. Re- 
funds will be computed as follows: 

If Registered 1-2 weeks 90% 

If Registered 3 weeks 60% 

If Registered more than 3 weeks No Refimd 

TITHE 

Students are encouraged to pay tithe on labor credit. Ar- 
rangements may be made with the Accounting Office to have 
charged to their accounts 10 percent of their earnings for tithe. 
These funds will be transferred to the local conference treasurer. 

PROPERTY INSURANCE 

Oakwood College is not responsible for the loss of private 
property by fire, or other causes. It is recommended that all stu- 
dents arrange for proper insurance coverage for their personal 
property. 



Financial Information 137 

SICK AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

All students registered at Oakwood College are covered by 
Student Health Insurance. The details of this coverage are con- 
tained in the folder obtainable from the College Health Service. 

STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Parents have an obligation to pay for the education of their 
children. They are expected to continue to provide, as well as they 
are able, the basic essentials of life whether the student lives at 
home or on a college campus. 

A student should provide a reasonable part of the total amount 
required to meet college expenses by accepting employment. Be- 
lieving in the inspired words that "systematic labor should consti- 
tute a part of the education of youth" (E. G. White) the college 
provides many on-campus jobs for students. 

The Primary purpose of the Financial Aid Program is to 
provide assistance to students who, without such aid, would be 
unable to attend college. In selecting students to receive financial 
assistance, the college will also place emphasis upon academic 
achievement and character. 

Students accepted for enrollment at Oakwood College may 
apply for Financial Aid through the following programs: 

WORK SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College makes provision for self-assistance for students 
by offering work scholarships. 

Students' work records are filed by the employer showing the 
employer's evaluation of the student's work habits covering his 
attendance, dependabihty, cooperation, skill and speed. 

Work may be assigned in the service departments, the ad- 
ministrative offices, and in the industries of the College. The in- 
dustries are operated by the College to provide work for the stu- 
dents. These industries do business with customers that require 
daily schedules. They must have a uniform working force. Stu- 
dents assigned to these industries must continue their work sched- 
ules to the end of the term. Any student who drops his work 
schedule without making proper arrangements may be dropped 
from class attendance until such arrangements are made, and his 
account becomes immediately payable in cash. 

To the best of its ability, the College makes an effort to provide 
students with jobs; however, it cannot guarantee work to a student 
even though his application may have been accepted on a plan 
calling for an approximate number of hours of work per week. 
Some students choose class schedules with classes so scattered that 
a reasonable work program is impossible. Some are physically or 
emotionally unable to work. Others, for various reasons, fail to 






138 Oakwood College 

meet work assignments. It is the responsibility of the student to 
render acceptable service to his employer in order to retain a job. 

Work assignments are retained on the basis of scholarship, 
dependability, and conduct. 

Work scholarships are not payable in cash and students are 
advised not to work more than the assigned hours without prior 
approval from the Finance Officer. Should a work scholarship 
credit remain on the account, the money may be transferred to an 
immediate relative's account, within two years; after that time, 
the scholarship will revert to the college's Student Labor Account. 

VETERANS 

Oakwood College is approved by the Veterans' Administration 
as an accredited training institution. Those who qualify for edu- 
cational benefits should contact the nearest Veterans Administra- 
tion Office. A certificate of eligibility will be issued by the Veterans 
Administration. 

LITERATURE EVANGELIST SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College participates in the Seventh-day Adventist Student 
Colporteur Scholarship Program. Information concerning this pro- 
gram may be obtained from the Local Conference Publishing De- 
partment, your minister, or the Coordinator of Literature Industry. 
Students having colporteur scholarships must make regular pay- 
ments on or before the date of registration or have their publishing 
houses send us a list of confirmation on the scholarships. This should 
be done before the day of registration. 

DEFERRED PAYMENT OF EDUCATIONAL COST 

For those parents and students who prefer to pay their educa- 
tional expenses in convenient monthly installments at low interest 
rates, the following plans are offered: Write for application to one 
of the following: 

The Tuition Plan, Inc. 

Concord, New Hampshire 03301 

Pickett and Hatcher Education Fund 
P.O. Box 2128 
Columbus, Georgia 31902 

Write to the Director of Student Finance for further information. 

STATE GUARANTEED LOANS 

The Guaranteed Loan Program has one purpose: to provide 
the means for the student to borrow money for college at low inter- 
est cost, with the Federal Government paying part of the interest 
for qualified students. 



Financial Information 139 

Any student who is enrolled or accepted for enrollment in an 
accredited public or private nonprofit college or university is 
eligible to apply for a loan for his educational expenses. 

HIGH SCHOOL VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN 

This college grants $500 scholarships to High School Vale- 
dictorians and $350 to Salutatorians. To receive this award the 
applicant must send to the College Registrar's Office a letter from 
the high school principal certifying the appointment. 

FEDERAL AID PROGRAMS 

All applicants applying for assistance under Federal Programs 
should make applications by July 31. Economic Opportunity 
Grants, Basic Opportunity Grants, National Direct Student Loans, 
Nursing Loans, and College Work-Study can be awarded only as 
long as the funds are available. 

A primary requirement for participation in these programs 
will be need. The college has selected the College Scholarship Service 
method of establishing need. The method requires a filing of the 
Parents' Confidential Statement with College Scholarship Service. 

Copies of this form may be obtained from the following places: 
1. College Scholarship Service, P. 0. Box 176, Princeton, New Jersey 
08540 2. A high school counselor in your area 3. The Director of 
Student Finance, Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama 35806. 

College Scholarship Service will submit to Oakwood College a 
Financial Need Analysis Sheet which will help to determine the 
need of the applicant. 

CONFERENCE MATCHING SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College in cooperation with the Regional Conferences, 
offers seventy-two scholarships of $300.00 each. These are granted 
on the basis of $100.00 from the local Conference, $100.00 from the 
College, and $100.00 from the Church where the student holds 
membership and will be applied during the Winter quarter. 

The church and conference may, if they choose, make as many 
two-way grants as they desire, but the College will match only one 
scholarship for each student, up to an established quota for each 
conference. No three-way scholarship will be matched unless it 
comes through the regional conference involved. 

BASIC OPPORTUNITY GRANTS 

Congress has voted the new Basic Opportunity Grants to new 
full-time post secondary students. Under the BOG Program, stu- 
dents are entitled to grants up to $1400, minus their family's ex- 
pected contribution to the cost of their education. One may obtain 
applications from his high school, post office, library or post- 
secondary institution. 



140 Oakwood College 

ALUMNI MATCHING SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College Alumni Chapter offers four $100 scholarships. 
The Alumni gives $50 and the College matches with $50. 

LOAN FUNDS 

The College is prepared to make available financial aid in 
small amounts to a few worthy students from the following funds: 

Frank and Novella Hale Loan Fund, $1,000. 

The George T. Harding Loan Fund of $750, established in 
1967. 

The Lieutenant Calvin Elston Peterson Loan Fund of $1,000, 
established in 1958 by his parents in his memory. 

The Cunningham-Reynolds Loan Fund of $1,000, established 
in 1955. 

F. L. Peterson Scientific Scholarship Fund, $2,000. 

The Ophelia Elizabeth Turner Memorial Student Loan Fund 
of $500, established by Dr. Herbert A. Turner in 1958. 

The Dr. Howard Welty Loan Fund, established in 1966. 

Lester W. WilUamson Loan Fund, $1,000. 

Alyne Dumas Lee Loan Fund, established in 1970 by the 
Huntsville Civic Opera Society. 

Esther Lowe Fund estabhshed in 1970, $375.00. 

Espie Carter Fund estabhshed in 1972, $10,000. 

E. W. Ward Loan Fund, estabhshed in 1968. 

The Catherine Hughes Waddell Loan Fimd, established in 
1971. 

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 

N. E. Burrell Scholarship Fund, $300. 
Presidential Scholarship, $6,000. 



Degrees Conferred 



141 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

June 2, 1974 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Biology and Chemistry 
Harrell Edward Robinson 

Business Administration 
AND Mathematics 
Cephas Ward 

Elementary Education 
AND History 

Nanci Elizabeth Edmond 

Elementary Education 
AND Music 

Kerri Geneen Laurence 

English and History 
Sylvia Jannice Jackson 

History and Religion 
John Levon Williams 

History and Theology 
Lewis W. Edwards 
Robert L. James 

Psychology and Theology 
Claude Shaw, Jr. 

Behavioral Science 
Ruby Jeanette Burgis 
Clement Augustus Murray 

Biology 

Ebenezer Iheanacho Agoha 
Yvonne Dilane Leonard 
James Clarence Mosley, Jr. 
David Louis Ruff 

Business Administration 
Ronald Louis Campbell 
Albert LeRoy Dudley 

Business Education 
Rhoda Dawn Lambe 



Chemistry 

Michael Leon Lester 
Nathan L. Lewis 
Onyema Aaron Nwaomah 
Reginald Sampson 

Elementary Education 
Joetta Peters 
Denise La Rue Willis 

English 

Linda L. Ammons 
Paula Cassandra Barnes 
Marlene Demetrise Carter 
Verna Renae Forbes 
Beaulah H. (Sheri) Forrest 

French 

Damaris Lynn Davison 
Lionel Heriveaux 

History 

Charles Daniel Battles 
L'Tanya Arvillia Brown 
Sandra Lamata Calvert 
Waldo George McMillan 
Dale Allen Patterson 
Kathy Jane Wimberly 

Home Economics 

Cheryl Denise Hackney 

McKenzie 
Lorna Jean Smith 

Mathematics 

Charles Edward Dudley, II 
Gerald Fairbanks Ford 
Ronald Lang 
Anita Elizabeth Thornton 

Music 

Doris Alford 



142 



Oakwood College 



BACHELOR OF 

Psychology 

Monica Beverly Holness 
Sharon Elizabeth Outlaw 
Jocelyn Denise Perkins 
Brenda Faye Rowe 
Marcia Louise Smith 
Samuel Tramel 

Theology 

Larry J. Bailey 
Raymond Richard Baker 



ARTS (Continued) 
Theology (Continued) 

James Wallace Cox, Jr. 

Francis Kezeli Gyorkey 

Kenneth Moore 

Mark Antonio McCleary 

Augustus F. Ogiste 

Bozidar Popov 

Melvin Preston 

Booker Talaphoro Rice, II 

Raymond Saunders, Jr. 



: 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Behavioral Science 
Willie James Irvin 

Business Administration 
Jacquelyn Annette Dobbins 
Parker R. Fluence, Jr. 
Lawrence Gadson 
Carolyn Anne Johnson 
Eugene Monroe Mason 
Patricia Mitchell 
Eugene Jerald Moore 
Cassandra Denise Robinson 
Emanuel Rodgers 
Susan Yvonn Trusty 

Business Education 
Sharon Rose Hudson 
Carolyn Elizabeth McMillan 

Dietetics 

Lily Silvera Wilson 

Elementary Education 
Deborah Byrd 
Cheryl Annette Coy 
Albertha M. Edwards 
Lillian L. C. Forbes 
Evelyn Furlow 
Norian Patricia Hoard 
Edwin James Humphrey, Jr. 



Elementary Education (Continued) 
Gail Marie Jones 
Halcyone Audrelyn Martin 
La Vern Scott 
Berenice Summerville 
Esther Vasciannie 
Pansy Maria Vaz 
Janet J. Watkins 

Home Economics 

Jocelyn Henriett Herring 
Noretta Coral Jenkins 
Joy Sylvia Jennings 
Carolyn Louise Riles 
Karen Marie Elizabeth 

Jackson Simpson 
Paulette Tramel 

Psychology 

James Arthur Barley 
Gloria Jean LaGrone 
Charles Silas LeMon 
Frederick George Murphy 

Secretarial Science 
Alona Eileen Boggess 
Andrea Oneeda Harris 
Cynthia Ellen Nutt 

Sociology 

Alice Miranda Anderson 



[J 



Degrees Conferred 



143 



BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

Concentrations: Psychology, Religion and Sociology 
Bobbie Laura McGhee Walker 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 

Secretarial Science 
Sandra Marie Cox Joan Ellory McLean 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

July 20, 1974 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Religion and Sociology 
Wendell Scott Johnson 



Biology 
Robert E. 



Pearman 



History 

Yearma Lockdock Falls 
Stanley Lamar Mims 

Mathematics 
Sheridan Brown 



Psychology 

Emmett L. Florence 
Sonia Maria Sealey 

Religion 

Albert Lee Teele 

Theology 
James R. Bell 
David Coleman 
Cornel Miller 
Melvin C. Stanley 
Ronald J. Wright, Sr. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Business Administration 
Anthony Anderson 
Glynis Marie Kilby 
Gwendolyn Rochelle Turner 
Major Aurelius White, Jr. 

Business Education 
Beatrice Banks 

Elementary Education 
Nina D. Kinnon 
Charlene Dossman Pembleton 

Home Economics 

Verna Jacquelyn Bowen 



Psychology 

Michael Charles Bennett 
Marvin Carmichael 
David L. Johnson 
Michele A. Powell 

Secretarial Science 
Rosemary D. Graham 

Sociology 

Queenie Patricia Bryant 
Deborah Elaine Duff 



144 



Oakwood College 



BACHELOR OF GENERAL STUDIES 

Concentrations: Elementary Education, 

History and Religion 

Shirley Ann Brown 

Concentrations: Behavioral Science, Biology and Music 
Prince Calvin Ward 



Geographical Distribution 



145 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 






1974-75 






UNITED STATES 






State 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Alabama 


102 


96 


198 


Arizona 


— 


2 


2 


Arkansas 


1 





1 


California 


68 


48 


116 


Colorado 


4 


7 


11 


Connecticut 


2 


6 


8 


Delaware 


— 


1 


1 


District of Columbia 


6 


5' 


11 


Florida 


21 


38 


59 


Georgia 


12 


33 


45 


Illinois 


33 


35 


68 


Indiana 


7 


17 


24 


Iowa 


1 


1 


2 


Kansas 


1 


3 


4 


Kentucky- 


3 


3 


6 


Louisiana 


4 


12 


16 


Maryland 


4 


14 


18 


Massachusetts 


2 


5 


7 


Michigan 


33 


26 


59 


Mississippi 


7 


11 


18 


Missouri 


6 


13 


19 


Montana 


— 


1 


1 


Nebraska 


— 


1 


1 


Nevada 


1 


— 


1 


New Jersey 


23 


18 


41 


New Mexico 


— 


1 


1 


New York 


70 


71 


141 


North Carolina 


12 


17 


29 


North Dakota 


— 


1 


1 


Ohio 


16 


31 


47 


Oklahoma 


2 


— 


2 


Oregon 


1 


2 


3 


Pennsylvania 


19 


30 


49 


South Carolina 


6 


7 


13 


Tennessee 


8 


18 


26 


Texas 


4 


8 


12 


Virginia 


7 


8 


15 


Washington 


— 


2 


2 


West Virginia 


1 


— 


1 


Wisconsin 


2 


3 


5 


Total U.S. Enrollment 


489 


595 


1,084 



146 



Oakwood College 





FOREIGN COUNTRIES 




Country 




Male 


Female 


Africa: 








Cameroun 




1 


— 


Ethiopia 




2 


— 


Ghana 




1 





Kenya 




1 


— 


Liberia 




5 


— ■ 


Nigeria 




26 


1 


Zambia 




2 


— 


Bahamas 




7 


2 


Bermuda 




13 


7 


Burma 




1 





Canada 




2 


2 


Costa Rica 







1 


England 




1 


— 


Holland 




1 


— 


Panama 







3 


Suriname 




2 


1 


Virgin Islands 




2 


4 


West Indies: 








Antigua 




1 


2 


Barbados 




— 


2 


Grenada 




1 


— 


Jamaica 




5 


6 


Montserrat 







1 


St. Vincent 




1 


1 


Trinidad 




4 


1 


Total Foreign Enrollment 


79 


34 


Grand Total 




568 


629 


(U.S. & Foreign) 







TotoZ 



1 
2 
1 
1 
5 

27 
2 
9 

20 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
6 

3 
2 
1 

11 
1 
2 
5 

113 

1,197 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 1974-75 



ENROLLMENT BY QUARTERS: 





Male 


Female 


Total 


Fall Quarter 


481 


554 


1,035 


Winter Quarter 


459 


551 


1,010 


Spring Quarter 


439 


529 


968 


Cumulative 


568 


629 


1,197 


^T BY CLASSES 


(Cumulative) : 








Male 


Female 


Total 


Freshmen 


264 


323 


587 


Sophomores 


127 


131 


258 


Juniors 


102 


72 


174 


Seniors 


48 


53 


101 


Specials 


27 


50 


77 



Total 



568 



629 



1,197 



, 



Index 



147 



INDEX 



A 

Absences 55, 56 

Academic Calendar 5 

Academic Policies 46 

Academic Probation 52 

Academy 34 

Accounts, Students' 132-133 

Accreditation 30 

Activities, Social 35 

Administrative Council and 

Officers 7, 8 

Admissions 40-45 

Admission Standards 40 

Advance Deposit 131-132 

Alumni Association 34 

Apartments 39 

Application Fee 41 

Application Procedure 40 

Applied Music 120 

Applied Theology 129 

Architecture 69 

Art 72 

Assembly Absences 56 

Attendance Regulations 55 

Auditing Courses 54 

Automobiles 39 

B 

Baccalaureate Degrees, 

Requirements for 58-62 

Bachelor of General Studies 

Degree 63 

Basic Requirements for 

Graduation * 58 

Bequests and Gifts .. Inside back cover 

Bible 128 

Biblical Languages 127, 130 

Bible Instructor Curriculum 127 

Biology 78-81 

Board of Trustees 6 

Buildings and Grounds 32 

Business Education 84 

Business Administration 81-84 

C 

Calendar for 1975-1976 5 

Campus of Oakwood College 29 

Candidacy for Degree 60 

Citizenship, Student 38 

Change of Program 48 

Chemistry 89-91 

Class Absences 55 

Classification of Students 47-48 

Club 36 

Committees of the Faculty 18 



Communications 100 

Cooperative Programs 69 

Convocations 35, 51 

Corrections 56 

Correspondence and Extension 

Work 54 

Counseling Service 37 

Course Numbers and Symbols .... 46 

Course Schedules 46 

Credit Hours 46, 47 

Curricula, Pre-Professional 65 

Curriculum Requirements 62 

D 

Dean's List 51 

Degrees and Diplomas 58 

Degrees, Candidacy for 60 

Degrees, Conferred 141-144 

Degrees, Requirements for 58 

Departments of Instruction 72 

Discount, Family 136 

Dismissal 37,38 

Division Chairmen 9 

Dormitory Fee 133 

E 

Education, Elementary 93 

Education, Secondary 85, 93 

Education, Vocational 97 

Employment, Student 35 

Engineering 69 

English and Literature 97 

Enrollment Summary 146 

Entrance Fee 131 

Errors and Corrections 56 

Examinations 49 

Examinations, Graduate Record .. 57 

Examinations, Proficiency 57 

Executive Committee 6 

Exemption, Courses 50 

Expenses 127 

Extension Work 54 

Extra-Curricular Activities 

Participation 35 

F 

Faculty ^ 10-17 

Federal Aid Programs 139 

Fee, Application 40, 131 

Fee, Entrance ^ 131 

Fee, Incidental 135 

Fee, Music 135 

Financial Information 131 

Food Services 131 

Foreign Student Training 32 



148 



Oakwood College 



French 115 

Freshmen and New Students 42 

Freshman Classification 41,48 

Funds, Loan 140 

G 

General Information 30 

Geographical Distribution .... 145, 146 

Geography 107 

Gifts and Bequests .. Inside back cover 

Governing Standards 37 

Grade-point Average (GPA) 51 

Grades and Reports 50 

Grading System 50 

Graduate Record Examination .... 57 

Graduation with Distinction 52 

Guidance Services 37 

H 

Handbook, Student 37 

Health and Physical Education .... 101 

Health Record 44 

Health Service 35 

History 103-107 

History of Oakwood College 30 

Home Economics 107 

Honor Roll 51 

Housing 133, 134 

I 

Incidental Fees 135 

Incomplete Work 52 

Instructional Staff 10-17 

Insurance 135 

Interdisciplinary Studies Ill 

International Student Admissions 45 
Intramural Sports 35 

J 

Junior Classification 48 

L 

Late Registration 48 

Leaves of Absence 38 

Liberal Arts Curriculum 62 

Library 34 

Literature and English 97 

Literature Evangelist Scholarships 138 

Loan Funds 140 

Loans, State and Government 137 

Location 31 

Lyceum 35 

M 

Major and Minor 59 

Married Students' Housing 134 

Mathematics and Physics 112 



Medical Technology 70 

Modern Languages 115 

Music 116,135 

Musical Structure and 

Organization 118 

Music Education 119 

Music History 121 

N 
Nursing 68, 122-124 



Oakwood Academy 34 

Objectives 30 

Organizations 34-37 

Orientation 34 

Overseas Students 132 

P 

Pass-or-Fail Courses 51 

Payment of Accounts 131 

Physics 114 

Political Science 106 

Pre-Dental 65, 67 

Pre-Examination Week 49 

Pre-Law 65 

Pre-Medical 65, 66 

Pre-Occupational Therapy 67 

Pre-Physical Therapy 67 

Pre-Professional Curricula 65 

Pre-Medical Record 

Administration 66 

Pre-Veterinary Medicine 70 

Pre-X-Ray 68 

Proficiency Examinations 57 

Property Insurance 136 

Psychology 73 

Publications 33 

R 

Refunds 136 

Registration, Late ..., 48 

Registration, Procedure 48 

Religion and Theology 125 

Religious Life 35 

Religious Services 

Attendance at 38, 56 

Remittances 133 

Repeated Courses 53 

Requirements for Graduation, 

Basic 62 

Requirements for Degrees 58 

Residence Halls 39 

Rules and Regulations 37, 38 

S 

Scholarships 137-140 

Second Bachelor's Degree 61 



Index 



149 



Secondary Teacher Education 92 

Secretarial Science 86 

Senior Classification 48 

Social Activities 35 

Sociology 75 

Sophomore Classification 48 

Spanish 115 

Special Students 48 

Speech 100 

Standards 37 

Standards for Graduation 58 

Student Citizenship 38 

Student Classification 47 

Student Employment 35, 137 

Student Handbook 37 

Student Life 34-39 

Student Organizations 36, 37 

Student Personal Guidance 37 

Study Load „.. 47 

Suggested Program of Studies 63 

Summer Program, H. S. Students 44 

Summer School 34 

Superintendents of Services 19 

Supervisors in Secondary and 

Elementary Education 17 



T 

Teacher Certification 92 

Terminal Curricula 65-71 

Tithe 136 

Transcripts 55 

Transfer Students 43 

Transient Admission 43 

Tuition Rates 131 

Two- Year Curricula 65-67, 87, 114, 124 

U 

United Student Movement 36 

Upper Division, Admission to 47 

V 

Vehicles, Use of 39 

Veterans, Information for .. 32, 44, 138 
Veterinary, Two-Four 

Cooperative 70 

Visiting Student Program 55 

Vocal and Instrumental 

Ensembles 122 

W 

Welcome to Oakwood 20 

Withdrawal 45, 49 

Work Scholarships ~ 137 



1 



: 



1 



J 
J 
] 

2 



] 
] 
] 
] 
] 



r II 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 

for 
OAKWOOD COLLEGE 

The philosophy of Oakwood College centers around 
five great objectives — spiritual, intellectual, physical, 
social, and vocational. In order to meet these objectives 
as it renders its many services, the College has been 
blessed with gifts from a few philanthropic friends. 
These funds have augmented the General Conference 
subsidy and student tuition. As its circle of educational 
and vocational activities is widened, however, the spirit 
of liberality needs to be exercised by many more friends 
of the College. 

Some of the immediate needs include the following: 

(1) Buildings and furnishings 

(2) Equipment — science laboratory, vocational, mu- 
sical instruments, and visual aids. 

(3) Library books, periodicals, and furnishings. 
Gifts to Oakwood College may be in cash or by will 

and may consist of personal property or real estate. 
Such gifts may be included in the deductible items which 
are allowed by the Internal Revenue Department in cal- 
culation of income tax in an amount up to 30 per cent of 
the donor's adjusted income. 

For further information please correspond with The 
President, Oakwood College, Huntsville, Alabama 35806. 



ir 




Enter to learn; 
depart to serve.